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FEBRUARY 1982 


DR LIVINGSTONE 

GAMES AND PROGRAMS 
FOR'THE SINCLAIR, 

PET, APPLE,TANDY AND 
MANY MORE 

DARK TOWER 

THE LATEST FANTASY 
CONCEPT IN 
ELECTRONIC GAMES 

WRITE YOUR OWN 
ADVENTURE , 

WE TELL YOU HOW 


4 $ 

f|Vm 

IS 

! |ij] f 










Commodore VIC-20 

A fully-fledged, fully expandible, computer with large typewriter- 
style keyboard, programmable function keys, PET compatible. 
Gives 24 colours and sound, (to the degree that it can be used to 
compose music). High resolution graphics module available as 
extra. Speaks BASIC. Easy-to-use, even for beginners. New 
VIC-20 material is available and more is on the way. Supplied 
with easy-to-read, easy-to-use manual, suitable for beginners 
and children. Programs can be stored on optional VIC tape 
recorder. Commodore approved supplier. 

Texas Instruments TI-99/4 

(PAL colour TV compatible) 

Usable literally within minutes of unpacking. Anyone can use it 
without previous computer experience or programming 
knowledge. Powerful 16K. BASIC language. Special features: 
high resolution graphics let you create animated displays, 
charts, graphs; built-in music synthesizer allows you to build 
notes and chords; equation calculator for maths solutions. 
Designed for home management, educational and 
entertainment use. Large amount of educational software 
available on modules for youngsters. Programs can also be 
stored using good quality tape recorder. Texas Instruments 
approved supplier. 




Trust the unique Compter 
Supermarket to be first with 
tiie unique new personal 

computers. 


Four new-technology computers bring you colour, sound, high 
resolution graphics. All with plug-in program modules. All at 
unique Computer Supermarket prices. 



To Computer Supermarket Ltd. Douglas House, , enc|ose my cheque for £ _ 
Queens Square, Corby, Northants. 


Please send me 

□. Commodore VIC-20 at £192.50 

□ Texas Instruments TI-99/4 at £302.50 

□ Atari 400 at £348.50 

□ Atari 800 at £648.50 
D Hardware/Software list 

□ Atari tape recorder at £45 inc. VAT, p&p 

□ VIC tape recorder at £40 inc. VAT, p&p 


Or debit my Access/Barclaycard/Diners Card No. 


Signature- 
Name_ 


Address _ 


- (BLOCK CAPITALS PLEASE) c VQ 


Atari 400 

Brings the family music, art, education, entertainment. A general 
purpose personal computer that’s easy to operate and offers 16 
colours, each with 8 intensities; high resolution graphics; 4 
sound synthesizers; 57 key alphanumeric keyboard with upper/ 
lower case, inverse video, full screen editing, four-way cursor 
control, 29 graphics keys. Programming languages: BASIC, 
ASSEMBLER, PILOT. Programs can be stored on optional Atari 
tape recorder. Atari approved supplier. 


Atari 800 

Top-of-the-line personal computer. Advanced peripheral 
components, comprehensive software library. Modular design 
precludes obsolescence. 16 colours (8 intensities), 4 sound 
synthesizers; 57 keys with upper/lower case, inverse video, full 
screen editing, four-way cursor control, 29 graphics keys. 
Programming languages: BASIC, EXTENDED BASIC, 
ASSEMBLER, PILOT, PASCAL. Programs can be stored on 
optional Atari tape recorder. Atari approved supplier. 


THESE EXCITING NEW PERSONAL 
COMPUTERS CONNECT TO VIRTUALLY 
ANY COLOUR OR MONO TV. Full range of 
peripherals will be available for each computer. 
All units are complete and ready to use. 13 amp 
plug fitted. Thorn colour TV’s can be supplied 
for use with these computers. Details on 
application. 

Prices include VAT. p&p & insurance £3.50 

Your remittance should be made payable to Computer Supermarket 
Ltd', and shall remain your money until the goods have been 
despatched to you at the address specified. All goods offered are 
subject to Computer Supermarket conditions of sale, copies available 
on request. Registered in England No. 2646589. 

PRESTEL SERVICE Prestel subscribers can obtain further details 
on these computers - and place orders for them - through the Prestel 
service PRESTEL No. 400400 





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COMPUTER SUPERMARKET LTD, DOUGLAS HOUSE, QUEENS SQUARE, CORBY, NORTHANTS. TELEPHONE 05366 61587/8 AND 62571 














































MAILBAG ...... .page 0 

Your views aired and your problems answered 

GAMES NEWS ----------... .page 8 

Fulfil Napoleon's dream or land a jumbo jet. A rundown 
of the latest games for your computer 

COMPETITIONS.page 13 

Me and my Template. Or 10 ways to ill-treat a piece of plastic 

CHESS.... >....... .page 16 

How do computers recognise good chess positions? 

Max Bramer explains 

VIDEO SCREENS ...........page 18 

Atari's Asteroids fills the Best Sellers spot and all 
the new cartridges for T.V. games centres 

REVERSI. ..page 20 

Othello by any other name. Tom Napier offers some 
guidelines for a simple program 

COMPUTER DOODLING.page 22 

Author David Langford starts an irregular column on how 
science fiction can serve computer gamers 

THE BUGS ...............page 24 

Snag Jnr. shows his expertise at Adventure 

ARCADE ACTION ..... ..page 26 

Puckman revisited. Two improved versions of the popular 
maze-chase game 

DOGFIGHT. page 28 

Grab a joystick and do battle on the Apple airways 

NIMBOT .... ►.. .page 3C 

A challenge to shoot the last Nascom robot 

ALIEN HUNT .. .page 38 

Track down and trap an alien on your Acorn Atom 

GRAND PRIX... .page 44 

Thrills and spills on the Tandy racetrack 

DR LIVINGSTONE.. ...........page 46 

The famous explorer is lost in the depths of your Sharp 

COSMOS LANDING ...page 54 

Ten ships to land on a constantly moving ZX81 platform 

BAD KING JOHN .. page 58 

Rule over a Pet kingdom. But. be warned, the peasants are 
in a revolting mood. 

ADVENTURE.page 62 

Two pyramids to explore. Keith Campbell offers some more tips 

KIT KORNER.. .page 64 

Peripherals in kit form. Keith Mott gives his views 

SOUNDS .. page 68 

David Annal POKEs some sounds out of the quieter micros 

GRAPHICS... page 71 

How to handle the high resolution graphics facility. 

Garry Marshall has the details 

PRACTICAL PROGRAMMING ............page 72 

Converting games from one machine to another. 

Ted Ball has some practical advice 

WHAT'S IN STORE ... ... .page 74 

We unravel the mysteries of Dark Tower — the 
electronic/board game set to fill next Christmas' stockings 

REVIEWS . page 76 

Enter the Halls of Death — but watch out for Mummy! 

DOWN TO BASICS ..:. page 8C 

Moira Norrie shows how Lady Luck can influence computers 

BRAINWARE ... page 88 

Two bottles of champagne and lots of kudos to be won 
in our regular competitions 

SOFTWARE GLOSSARY ... . .. .page 84 

HARDCORE. .page 86 

AD INDEX.........page 8f 


L EISURE is a much bigger pastime in the U.S. and 
the games which are successful over there tend 
to cross the Atlantic six-12 months later. In our next 
issue we report back on the latest toys and games to 
find their way onto the American scene. 


H ARDCORE changes its format next issue when 
we take an in-depth look at the Acorn Atom. 
With an exhaustive list of the companies which 
supply games software and peripherals for it. All 
you ever wanted to know about the Atom but didn't 
know who to ask, next month. 


B OLDLY go where no man has gone before in our 
Startrek game next month. Startrek 111.4 offers a 
few extra features, on top of the usual Klingons, 
starbases and stars. Octadraw, Entomb and Yaht- 
zee also feature in our games listing section. 


Editor Terry Pratt 


Assistant editor Elspeth Joiner 


Editorial assistant Susan Cameron 


Design Linda Freeman 


Advertisement manager Simon Teager 


Advertisement executives Rita Lewis, Neil Wood 


Advertisement assistant Louise Flockhart 


Publisher Tom Moloney 


Editorial and advertisement offices: Durrant House, 8 Herbal Hill, London 
EC1R 5JB; Telephone Editorial 01-278 6556, Advertising 01-278 6552 


COMPUTER AND VIDEO GAMES POSTAL SUBSCRIPTION SERVICE 

By using the special Postal Subscription Service, copies of COMPUTER 
AND VIDEO GAMES can be mailed direct from our offices each month to 
any address throughout the world. All subscription applications should be 
sent for processing to COMPUTER AND VIDEO GAMES (Subscription 
Department), Competition House, Farmdon Road, Market Harborough, 
Leicestershire. All orders should include the appropriate remittance made 
payable to COMPUTER AND VIDEO GAMES. 

Annual subscription rates (12 issues): 

UK and Eire £10.00 

Overseas surface mail £12.00 

Airmail Europe £20.00 

Additional service information including individual overseas airmail 
rates available upon request. 

Published and distributed by EMAP National Publications Ltd. 

Printed by Eden Fisher (Southend) Limited. 

© Computer & Video Games Limited 
ISSN 0261 3697. 


Other Illustrations by: Elphin Lloyd-Jones, Jon Davis, Dorian 
Cross and Terry Rogers. 


Cover: Illustration by Steve Weston 


No. 4 FEBRUARY 1982 


ISSUE ON SALE FEBRUARY 16th 






























































Isn't it about time you 
took out a subscription 
to Computer and 
Video Games? 



Address- 


* 


Computer 
& Video Games. 

The magazine that 
| makes computers fun. | 


Computer & Video Games is 
the monthly magazine designed 
to make sure you get the most 
out of your computer. 

It brings the best 
entertainment out of all types 
of computer, from personal 
Sinclairs, Ataris, Tandys, VICs, 
Apples and PETs to viewdata 
and arcade machines. 

Every issue’s packed with 


pages of games programs for 
you to key-in to your machine. 
And you don’t have to be a 
computer expert. Each month 
there’s reviews of new 
computer and video games, 
regular pages on chess, 
adventure and kit-building. 

Learn to program or improve 
your programming skills with 
our regular features on the art 
and find out how to add 
graphics and sounds to the 
games you invent yourself. 
There’s also regular 
brain-teasers, prizes plus hints 
on how to beat arcade video 
machines. 

Computer and Video Games 
is packed with new ways for 
people to get fun out of 
computers. Make the most of 
your leisure time. Make sure of 
a copy of Computer & Video 
Games. 


Available at all 
leading newsagents 


1 would like to take out an annual 
subscription. 1 enclose a cheque/P.O. 
for £10 (£20 overseas), for twelve 
I issues. Computer & Video Games, 

I Competition House, Farmdon Road, 
| Market Harborough, Leicestershire. 


N ame 


Whether your idea of a 
worthwhile challenge is saving 
Europe in a war game, 
sharpening your chess strategy, 
or landing a 747 on a dark 
night, computers can make it 
possible. 

Computer games are 
reaching new levels of 
exhilaration, realism and 
imagination. They can already 
test your intellect and dexterity 
to its limits, in the 
not-too-distant future there will 
be no limits to the excitement 
they can simulate. 


4 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 


















BBC 

GAMES 

Dear Sir, 

I am about to buy a BBC 
Microcomputer (ANB 01) 
and I would be pleased if 
you could let me have 
sources of directly (or 
readily adaptable) 
available games software 
suitable for 32K RAM. 

Colin Lindsay 

Chorley 

Lancs 

Editor's reply: At the 
moment the only firm 
known to be producing 
games software for the 
BBC Microcomputer is 
Acorn, the firm making the 
hardware. 

The latest word is that 
Acorn is in the process of 
converting some of the 
games currently on its 
books to run on the BBC 
machine, but these are not 
expected to be readily 
available until March at 
the very earliest. I'm afraid 
you will just have to sit 
tight, or get to grips with 
programming and work on 
some of your own games 
Colin. Good luck. 

PREMIER'S 
NO. 1 FAN 

Dear Sir, 

I was surprised to read 
your comments on the 
Premier Publications 
software, Ship of The Line, 
page 83, issue 2 of your (or 
is it my) magazine. 

I cannot speak 
personally of this game or 
any other ZX81 software as 
I own a U.K. 101, but I can 
tell you of the service 
offered by Premier. 

To date I have brought 
five games, up-rated to the 
excellent monitor, 
"Cegman", added the new 
Basic ROM, "Basic 5", and 
have joined the "OS1/U.K. 
User Group", all thanks to 
Premier. I also receive a 
free newsletter which, 
apart from describing the 
latest additions to the 
range of games, ROMs and 
hardware, also offers hints 
and tips on how to expand 
and how to get the best 
from my machine. I am 
also comforted to know 


NOVEMBER 
CAME EARLY 



Do you have any views or comments on Computer & Video 


Games? If so we would love to hear from you. We will also do 
our best to find answers to any queries you may have or solve 
problems you might be experiencing with your computer. Please 
drop us a line at: Computer & Video Games, EMAP, Durrant 
House, 8 Herbal Hill, London EC1R 5JB. If you have already sent 
in a letter which has not yet been published, please bear with 
us as we have been overwhelmed by mail after our early issues. 
We will get around to your query as soon as possible. 


that if my computer 
decided to "Shuffle off this 
mortal coil", then Premier 
offers a computer repair 
system. If I ever become 
lost within the ROMs, 
RAMs, address buses, 
clock pulses or software 
listings, then a quick 
phone call, during office 
hours, or the use of the 
customer phone-in service 
will put me on the right 
track quickly and 
efficiently. 

So, if on the very rare 
occasion that one of 
Premier's products fails to 
work correctly, then simply 
contact Premier. You will 
find them the most helpful 
and friendly people and 
easily Britain's, if not the 
World's, best software 
company, without another 
company nearing the 
standard of their produce 
or service. 

Stephen Wood 
Sth. Croydon , 

Surrey 

Editor's reply: We had 
suspected that this may 
have been an isolated 
case, Stephen, but felt 
there was no excuse for 
sending out a tape which 
has people actually talking 
on it. The author of Ship of 
the Line has since sent us 
another copy of the game 
and we look forward to 
giving it another try in the 
near future. 


DODGEMS 

DODGE 

Dear Sir, 

Modifications to allow your 
November Acorn Atom 
Dodgems program to run 
without floating point 
ROM: 

A) 11125: remove 
"COLOUR 2;" 

11250: remove 
"COLOUR 1;" 

B) 20, 40, 60, 80: in each 
alter 

"S = S + SGN (T-S);" 
to GOSj; S=S+K; and 
add 

30000j K=T-S; IFK=0 

10 R 

30010 IFK>0 K=1;R 
30020K= — 1;R 

C) During debugging, 
remove end of line 
10000 from "?16= ..." 
(Inclusive) 

Tom Boyd 
Holmbury St. Mary , 

Dorking , Surrey. 

P.S. D) 11125 should be 
CLEAR Z, not 3 — 
Congratulations on an 
otherwise high standard of 
bug-free code! 

Dodgems author 
John Dyson replies: 
Thankyou for your 
modifications for running 
Dodgems on a machine 
without the floating point 
ROM. 


Dear Sir, 

My main question is if I 
could somehow get a copy 
of what I think must be 
your November issue. 

That's the one I first saw, a 
friend had it. 

I got down to the local 
newsagents as fast as 
possible, but they already 
had the December issue, 
and thus had already sent 
back the others. After 
searching all over I found 
the situation was the same 
all over. So I tried 
convincing my friend to 
sell me his copy, but no 
dice. 

So as a last resort I'm 
contacting you. Since I 
don't know how much it 
would cost for you to mail 
me a copy, I couldn't send 
the money along. But if you 
can save me one and write 
and say so and how much, 

I would happily send the 
money. 

I love your magazine and 
think it will do very well. I 
only have one suggestion. 
Although you can't take the 
suggestion of B. A. Moore 
(December Mailbag), 
maybe you could put 
comments beside the 
not-so-obvious parts of the 
programs to explain 
exactly what they do. Then 
people could translate the 
games into whatever 
language they are working 
in. That way only one set 
of comments would be 
needed, and in only one 
language, English! I hope 
you can get me that copy. 
Colin Garrett 
Northcourt Avenue , 

Reading. 

Editor's reply: We have 
had several enquiries 
about back issues. These 
can be obtained from 
EMAP National 
Publications Limited, 
Computer & Video Games 
Circulation Department, 
Reader Service, Bretton 
Court, Bretton, 
Peterborough. PE3 8DZ. 

On your other point, 
Colin, we are picking out a 
couple of programs each 
issue and giving a 
rundown on the variables 
and which parts of the 
program do what. 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 5 







SARGON FOR 
THE SHARP? 

Dear Sir, 

I have a Sharp MZ-80K 48K 
computer and am 
interested in obtaining a 
chess program for it ideally 
Sargon II. I have been 
unable to find this program 
for the Sharp and 
wondered if you know of 
anyone producing it for my 
machine. 

Alternatively could you 
let me know how the chess 
program that Newbear Ltd, 
Newbury, Berks, have 
compares with Sargon II. 

I enjoyed your first 
magazine, although I 
haven't managed to get 
"Hangman" working yet 
and look forward to your 
next. 

J Hunter, 

Hove Edge, 

Brighouse, 

W. Yorks. 

Editor's reply: I'm sorry to 
have to report that chess 
games for the Sharp 
MZ-80K are few and far 
between. There is no 
Sargon II available for the 
machine although 
Sharpsoft has written a 
version but the copyright is 
owned by Hayden Books 
who are unwilling for 
Sharpsoft to market it. 

Sharpsoft does market its 
own chess game but it is 
only for beginners. 
Experienced players would 
soon find the game 
unchallenging. 

Newbear's chess game is 
not as demanding as 
Sargon II either, and 
although it is not directly 
aimed at beginners the 
bulk of sales is made up of 
inexperienced players and 
children. 

ATARI'S 

FAME 

Dear Sir, 

Congratulations on your 
first issue of Computer & 
Video Gomes which 
certainly fits more into my 
own microcomputer 
aspirations than any of the 
other more business 
oriented publications 
around. 



Many of you may have tried to contact advertisers through our 
reader enquiry service. Unfortunately, due to the massive reader 
response we have not been able to process all of these. If you 
filled in a card and still have not heard from our advertisers, we 
would suggest you contact the company concerned directly. We 
are sorry for any inconvenience but nobody could have predicted 
the phenomenal response we received on our first two issues. 


I am a keen computer 
games player, and writer, 
although I only presently 
own a Sinclair ZX80. I am 
looking around to buy 
myself a new computer 
and have heard that the 
Atari duo have by far the 
best graphics facilities — 
although I have never seen 
either of these machines in 
action. 

Could you please tell me 
if the Atari 400 and 800 
graphics are more 
impressive than other 
machines in a similar price 
range — and if so why 
aren't other manufacturers 
using a similar system? 
Joseph Sandridge, 

Chells, 

Stevenage, 

Herts. 

Editor's reply: The Atari 
computers certainly have 
good graphics characters, 
and the games ROM-packs 
that plug into the system 
use these to their best 
advantage. However, the 
highest resolution of the 
Atari system is 320 x 192 
points — or picture 
elements (pixels). This is 
quite acceptable for most 
users. The Atari computers 
cost around £345 and £645 
respectively. 

Other manufacturers do 
use high resolution 
graphics — in up to 16 
colours. Notable among 
Atari's competitors are DAI 
with the PC.l' costing £595. 
This has more memory 
than the Atari 800 — 48K 
compared to 16K — and 
has even more pixels — 

335 x 255. Unfortunately it 
has only a small amount of 
very good software. Texas 
Instruments have recently 
reduced the price of the T1 
99/4a to around £300. This 
has a similar specification 
to the Atari 800 — and has 
the capability of superior 
graphics because of the 
use of a 16 bit processor, 
compared to most other 
systems' 8 bit. 

As you can see I have 
only scratched the surface 
and more systems are 


coming onto the market all 
the time. The VIC-20 and 
BBC Microcomputer will 
also give the Atari 400 a 
run for its money — and 
both are cheaper. You can 
see that it's more difficult 
than you first thought. 

Get friendly with your 
local dealer, and find out 
what support he'll give 
you. Compare dealers, if 
you have a choice, and 
then look at software 
availability and cost. Only 
you can evaluate all these 
factors yourself. 

MASTERING 
THE MACHINE 

Dear Sir, 

Thank you for an 
interesting new magazine, 
it seems to fit the gap 
between the 

semi-professional format of 
the home computer user 
and the "toy" market. 

I have an Acetronic MPU 
1000 Video Games Centre 
with a variety of 
preprogrammed cartridges. 

The one cartridge that is 
programmable is the 
Hobby Module but, apart 
from the few programs they 
supply in their instruction 
manual, I cannot seem to 
master the machine code 
that is needed to operate 
it, can anyone help? 

The maker of the chip, a 
2650 by Mullard, had 
produced a book by S. J. 

Op Het Veld entitled 
Microprocessor Controlled 
Video Games but is now 
out of print and no hope of 
it being reprinted so now 
you know why I need help. 

I have solved your 
octagon puzzle the "old 
fashioned" way in about 15 
minutes. If I had a proper 
computer I would, 
somehow, work out a 
program in order to enter 
your competition for the 
Vic-20 you are offering, I 
think it's great. 

If any of your readers 
can help me find any 
programs for the 2650 chip, 


or has a copy of the book 
above, I would be more 
than grateful. 

J. F. Baldock 
Ashford, 

Kent. 

Our expert replies: 
concerning you problem 
with the Acetronic MPU 
1000 Video Games Centre. 
You rightly state that the 
chip is a 2650 from 
Signetics, made by 
Mullard. This is a general 
purpose microprocessor 
with a 75 code instruction 
set. 

I am afraid I can find no 
information on the book 
Microprocessor Controlled 
Video Games by S. J. Op 
Het Veld and can only 
suggest you try the public 
library. If the book was on 
sale in this country then 
the Central Library will 
have a copy. 

On the other hand, 
Mullard produce a data 
sheet and Signetics a 
complete family booklet, 
both available from 
Mullard at Torrington Place 
in London. Both include the 
complete instruction set 
but you may have to 
consult a separate book to 
understand how to use the 
different addressing 
modes. 

MOLE GOES 
DOWN 

Dear Sir, 

I have entered your Mole 
program and it is a very 
enjoyable game but I 
cannot get a score and feel 
there is a mistake in line 
25 which I cannot enter 
successfully. 

Can you help? 

I have entered the 
other two Sinclair games in 
your January issue and 
found them most enjoyable. 

Congratulations on an 
extremely impressive 
magazine. 

D. Johnson, 

Croydon, Surrey 

Editor's reply: A bug 
slipped into this program 
which had to be typeset. 
Line 25 should read: 

25 LET R = PEEK (PEEK 
16398+256* PEEK 16399) 

We apologise for the 
mistake and hope you 
enjoy the game. 


6 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 







pi (HIP 




GONE ON THE 
GREEN THINGS 

Dear Sir, 

Many thanks for a 
wonderfully different 
magazine. I was 
particularly impressed with 
the way you have tried to 
present the games listings 
in an interesting and 
imaginative way. The Bugs 
are a marvellous invention 
and almost worth a 
magazine on their own. 

Among the other artwork, 
I thought the most 
impressive were the 
strange creatures which 
were used to illustrate the 
Acorn Atom's Green Things 
game. I look forward to 
seeing more work by your 
artistic team in the future. 
David Green, 

Wolvercote, 

Oxford. 

BOGGED 
DOWN 
IN ACTION 

Dear Sir, 

For just over a year now 
my friends and I have been 
making up a variety of 
arcade-style computer 
games on the school 
computer (an Apple II 48K 
Europlus). 

The main problem with 
these games is that the 
more action, aliens and 
obstacles the more bogged 
down and slower the 
program gets. This causes 
all moving shapes to 
flicker something terrible. 

Obviously what is 
needed is machine 
language routines, such as 
those used in Bill Budge's 
Penny Arcade where the 
ball does not flicker and 
will bounce off anything 
that is not black. The 
information to make up 
similar routines is sadly 
absent from the available 
Apple manuals and so I 
must seek your help. 


At the moment the 
shapes for our games are 
stored on disc, separate 
from the programs and are 
loaded and addressed by 
an exec, program which is 
fine for me, but not for less 
knowledgeable people who 
just run the program and 
expect it to work. 

We do have programs 
which will load the shapes 
when asked but the 
addressing causes 
interference with any 
inputs immediately 
afterwards. 

Naturally the direct 
POKE-ing of the shape 
table into the Apple 
memory in the first issue's 
Nim program interested me 
and I would be grateful if 
you could tell me how the 
author achieved this and 
how shape tables can be 
made without all the 
messing around with 
binary numbers, plotting 
diagrams, vectors and 
hexadecimal numbers. 

I think your magazine is 
just what the computer 
industry needs and I hope 
to contribute some of my 
program listings in the 
near future. 

Neil Forsyth 
Naim 
Nairnshire 
Scotland 

Garry Marshall: The high 
resolution shape tables, 
available in Applesoft, are 
precisely what you need. 
As far as "messing about 
with the binary numbers" 
is concerned, you have to 
do it that way, because 
that is the way it works. 
Actually, it isn't at all 
difficult to do, once you 
have got the hang of it. I 
don't think that you would 
expect to get rapid moving 
graphics effects without 
expending a little effort. 

The graphics effects can 
be really spectacular: once 


the shape is entered. 
Applesoft permits it to be 
drawn, erased, scaled and 
rotated with a minimum of 
programming effort. Watch 
the Graphics page for 
further details. 

A SOFTWARE 
SENSATION 

Dear Sir, 

To my mind, people are 
attracted to arcade games 
subconsciously, for they 
often get out far more than 
they put into these 
computers. 

Take Atari's Battlezone. 

It caught my eye in a 
fish'n'chip shop because of 
the XY monitor with vector 
scans, and the prodigious 
amount of maths the 
computer gets through in 
real time. In case you 
haven't met it, it's a 
fighting tank simulator in 
which you drive around a 
valley dodging missiles 
and rocks. Everything is 
portrayed in full 
perspective, right down to 
the missiles flying longer 
to distant targets. 

A kind man let me mend 
one. There's a 6502 riding a 
12K program, plus four 
custom bit-slice chips 
doing 16-bit trigonometry, 
among the 150 other 
support devices. She 
certainly puts out more 
than you put in. At a guess 
the software came out of 
the backdoor from NASA, 
Boeing and Lockhead. 

Thought your readers 
might be interested. 
Jonathan Pope 
Chesterton Road, 

Cambridge. 

TAINTED BY 
TINTS 

Dear Sir, 

I have just copied a 
program for solving Rubik's 
Cube from your magazine, 
and I think you may be 


interested in the following 
remarks on the 
presentation of this kind of 
material. 

I presume you wish your 
readers to get the 
programs in your magazine 
up and running with as 
little trouble as possible. A 
clear and accurate printing 
is therefore required. I 
know that many 
microcomputers are 
provided with poor 
printers, and that accuracy 
demands that you print by 
some photographic process 
from such output. 

I am not convinced, 
however, that you are not 
adding further difficulties 
for your readers by the way 
the programs are printed. 
The dark grey on light grey 
technique of page 62 is 
particularly troublesome, 
the pictures on many of the 
pages are also distracting. 
Fortunately I did not have 
to contend with printing on 
the slant, or with a program 
printed over pictures, both 
of which occur elsewhere. 

A lively pictorial 
presentation is of course 
an admirable aim, but if 
you want your readers to 
enjoy the programs you 
publish and buy further 
copies of your magazine I 
feel you must make 
copying the program more 
easy. 

D. Bond 
Kesgrove, 

Ipswich. 

Editor's reply: Thank you 
for your comments Mr 
Bond. We do appreciate 
the difficulties of keying-in 
programs, especially the 
long and complicated ones. 
We do take great care to 
ensure that when coloured 
tints and pictures are 
placed over printout, that 
the symbols can still be 
seen clearly. 

If you find them a 
distraction I suggest you 
use a ruler (or, dare I 
suggest, a template) to 
keep your place in the 
listing. Our aim is to keep 
the listings both readable 
and presentable. 


i 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 7 






















EAT AWAY 
A HIGH 
SCORE 


LUNAR RESCUE 
MISSION 


MUNUHIt MAN 


The Munchie Man's appetite is of 
a kind common among readers of 
slimming magazines. 

He digests without discomfort 
and travels around your Acorn 
Atom screen consuming dots as 
fast as he can. But he has 
enemies, four ghosts, whose aim 
is to put a stop to the ravenous 
creature by eating him up. 

In this version of the arcade 
game Puckman or Mazeman, you 
play the part of the Munchie Man 
and score points for every morsel 
you eat. 

Bonus points are accumulated 
by eating the evil meanies when 
the tables are reversed. This is 
achieved by gulping down one of 
the flashing spots in the corners 
of the screen, which gives you 
the energy to chase and eat the 
meanies for a few brief seconds. 

Program Power are the sup¬ 
pliers of the game which runs on 
a full memory Acorn Atom and 
will cost £4.95 for a cassette. 
Perhaps it could be good aver¬ 
sion therapy for a slimmer. 

TAKE A 
BALLOON TO 
THE TOP 


I ■ 


SAVE BARTH'S 
EMPIRE 


EMPIRE STRIKES BACK 


Join the forces of the tyrannical 
Darth Vader, waging war against 
the rebels who dare to oppose 
the Empire. 

In Empire Strikes Back you are 
given command of a squadron of 
Walker Tanks, which look like 
camels but are made of metal and 
are equipped with lethal laser 
guns. 

You answer to the menacing 
leader Darth Vader if you lose 


THE GREAT BALLOON RACE 


A £50 prize adds to the incentive 
of mastering the Great Balloon 
Race and notching a top score. 

Manchester-based Mr Micro 
have put up the money for the 
person who can best guide a 
balloon around a course on the 
Pet or VIC-20 computers. Among 
the lethal hazards on the course 
are: flowers, trees, and a fence. 

You score points for the dis¬ 
tance you manage to guide your 
balloon. 

The maker has come up with 
an ingenious idea to verify each 
entrant's score. Special charac¬ 
ters flash up on the screen to 
represent a particular score. The 
race finishes on 14 October 1982 
and the cassette costs £16. 


a tank and the Empire goes down 
on numbers. 

Your five Walker Tanks are in 
pursuit of the rebels and you 
must shoot down their aircraft, 
their troops and finally the rebel 
base itself. If you lose a tank in 
combat, the one taking over car¬ 
ries on where the other left off, 
so you don't have to go back to 
the beginning of the game and 
start again. 

The Walker Tanks are precari¬ 
ous in their movement and you 
must be careful not to stop them 
when they are in an unstable 
position. If you do the Walker will 
keel over and collapse into a 
useless heap. 

Throughout the game you can 
check how far away the Walker 
Tanks are from the rebel base 
and you can also spot enemy 
positions on your radar scanner. 

Incorporated on the screen is 
a work cycle meter which, when 
completed, either generates 
more energy for the Walker, or 
carries out any repairs the tank 
needs. 

Supplier of this game is Tandy 
software specialist Molimerx of 
Sussex. It can be yours for £10.06 
(including VAT) and runs on a 16K 
Tandy TRS-80 Level II. 


A stranded tribe of lunar crea¬ 
tures in fear of their lives look to 
you for an escape route. 

As commander of the mother- 
ship hovering over the surface of 
the moon, your brief in Space 
Rescue is to save the moonies, 
or pods, as they are usually 
known. A special landing craft 
carried by the mothership is 
under your control and struggling 
against the relentless onslaught 
of a meteorite storm. 

You have to land the craft on 
the moon's surface and pick up 
five pods, at the same time blast¬ 
ing the rocks to smithereens. 
After each pod is rescued you 
must take him back to the 
mothership. 

Points are scored for pod pick¬ 
ing and meteorites destroyed. 

Altogether you get four lives 
to play with and there are nine 
skill levels to try out — and 
sound effects too. Available now 
from Pet software specialists 
Supersoft, it runs on an 8K 
machine and costs £8 plus V.A.T. 

A DASH OF 
OUTER SPACE 
DIPLOMACY 


STARSMP COMMAND 


Combine Startrek with the war- 
game concept, add a dash of 
Diplomacy and you'll end up with 
Starship Command. 

The game is set in a spacecraft 
which patrols the galaxy, seeking 
out enemy spacecraft and keep¬ 
ing your allies on the right side. 

In front of you is a three 
dimensional view of the galaxy 
divided up into quadrants. You 
must shoot down enemy ships 
while avoiding their fire. 

But you are also in contact 
with other planets, some of 
which are hostile and others 
friendly. Your job is to boost the 
morale of your supporters to 
stop them changing sides and 
going over to the enemy. 

It runs on the Nascom and 
costs £9.95 available from Pro¬ 
gram Power of Leeds. 


SPACE RESCUE 















































INVADERS NEW ONSLAUGHT 


BURIED AND 
DEAD 


ALIEN 


Old fashioned pick and shovel 
work is the only way to rid your 
planet of a strange new breed of 
alien creatures. 

In Alien, the action takes place 
in a maze, infiltrated by leggy 
beings, whose aim is to hunt you 
down and eat you. 

Your only escape is to dig 
holes in the labyrinths of the 
maze blocking the hungry crea¬ 
tures' way. When they fall into 
the holes you have dug, you must 
hover nearby and fill the hole in 
over their heads. 

The aliens are surprisingly 
agile and in a flash they can hop 
out of their potential coffin and 
eat your man up in one fell 
swoop. You get points for the 
number of evil meanies you suc¬ 
cessfully bury, and if you wipe 
one frame clean of them you get 
the chance to have another go at 
a new frame. 

Alien will run on a VIC-20, and 
makes use of the machine's high 
resolution graphics. It can be 
yours for £19.95 from Commodore 
dealers. 

RACE AGAINST 
THE CLOCK 


SUPER RACETRACK 


Driving round a race course at 
top speed is a test of concentra¬ 
tion and skill to stay on the track 
and take the chequered flag in 
Super Racetrack. 

This game is a race against the 
clock with the object being to 
break lap and race records. There 
is plenty of variety in the course 
selection so if you start to antici¬ 
pate the hairpin bends on one 
track, try another. 

Steer the car around the 
course keeping clear of other 
cars and the barriers bordering 
both sides of the course. 

At the start, the car appears 
on the bottom of the screen but 
when the race is underway, the 
track unrolls before you on the 
screen. 

This Acorn Atom cartridge is 
reasonably priced at £4.95 from 
Program Power of Leeds. 



A JUMBO 
SIZED JOB 


747 FLIGHT 


INVADERS 


Blast away at a fleet of attacking up of three rows of seven crea- 
. creaturesv in defence of your • tures each. Extra points are 
: home base while niftily avoiding gained by hitting the flying 
the onslaught of laser beams. saucer at the top of the screen. 

With four protective shields to Invaders costs £4 from Bug 
protect your ship from the raging Byte of Liverpool, which has also 
torrent of enemy fire you man- just brought out a new chess 
oeuvre the base to the left and game for the Acorn Atom, 
right of the screen. Keep up a Bug Byte says the game's 
constant stream of shots to des- strengths lie in its graphical rep- 
troy each fleet, but don't expect resentation. 'It is clearer than 
to end up on the winning side, most chess games. In some 
This 16K ZX81 version of space there is confusion over the black 
invaders has been written in and white pieces'. It runs on a 
machine code to achieve high 12K Atom and comes in cassette 
speed screen action with a fleet form with instructions, costing 
of invaders numbering 21 made £9.00. 

WE HAVE TOUCHDOWN 


SUPERUNKR 


Passengers and crew of a 747 
Jumbo Jet are in your hands on a 
flight to land at England's busiest 
airport Heathrow. 

The huge aircraft is solely in 
your command as you fly in the 
pilot's hot seat through the sub¬ 
urbs of London. When you have 
located the position of two 
Heathrow runways you must 
start the descent and safely land 
the aircraft. Just how good a 
pilot you are will be revealed 
once you have completed the 
landing — as you receive points 
for airmanship. 

Bug Byte's 747 Flight runs on 
an Acorn Atom and was actually 
written by a Jumbo Jet pilot for 
the Liverpool software supplier, 
so it earns top marks for its 
realism. 

On the screen you are con¬ 
fronted with various figures rep¬ 
resenting altitude, the state of 
the undercarriage, a compass, 
the rate of climb in feet per 
second, the speed of the aircraft 
in knots and the angle of the 
flaps in degrees, to name but a 
few. 

To help you on your flight, a 
map of Heathrow's environs has 
been included with the game. On 
it are marked the 10 stations (six 
of which are close to the two 
runways) and possible flight 
paths. 

All 12K memory is needed to 
run this simulation game and it 
costs £8. 



Landing a spacecraft on the 
craggy hazardous surface of a 
strange planet is no easy task 
and you need a steady hand at 
the controls. 

In the first batch of games 
brought out by Commodore Busi¬ 
ness Machines for the VIC-20 
your task is to successfully land 
your spaceship. There are three 
safe landing sites to steer the 
ship towards. A safe landing 
needs careful judgement and a 
steady slow approach. 

You use the joysticks to con¬ 
trol the movement of the space¬ 


craft, guiding it upwards, down¬ 
wards, to the right and to the 
left. An extra feature is its power 
thrust facility. If you want to 
build up speed the engines will 
be boosted by pushing the con¬ 
trol joystick down. 

Points are awarded depending 
on the difficulty of the site you 
choose to land on. Superlander is 
available now from Commodore 
dealers for £19.95. 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 9 




































INGENIOUS 
Genie I 

All the features of the EG3003 system | 
plus: * Machine Language Monitor 

* Fitted Sound * Renumber Command \ 

* Full Lower Case * Screen Print 


16K 



£295 


4 VAT 


Acorn Atom 

Special features include 
*FULL SIZED KEYBOARD 
* ASSEMBLER AND BASIC 
*HIGH RESOLUTION COLOUR 
GRAPHICS 



s 




J \ 


from: 



£120 


4 VAT 


TANTEL 

PRESTEL' 

adaptor 

Converts any black 
and white or 
colour T.V. 
for PRESTEL' 
reception. 

£170 


VAT 


Printers 

EPSON MX80 
EPSON MX100 
ANADEX 
PAPER TIGER 
T.E.C. 
SCRIPTA 
MICROLINE 80 


The most compact 80 column 
impact graphic-dot 
printer available 

at a very compact price 

seikosha 


GP80 

printer 

£195 


4 VAT 



EG3023 

Special adaptor to 
allow connection of 
TRS80 to GENIE 
periferals 

EG3014 

GENIE low cost 16K 
expander 


Genie II 


The MacroComputer 
Offering all the advantages of the 
Genie I system, with the benefit 
of advanced design for the 
professional user. 

* 4 Defineabie Function Keys 
' Full Upper & Lower Case 
Terminal Routines 
r Facility to upload & Download 
Screen Print 

’ Includes T. V. Modulator 


£310 


VAT 


The Second Generation 
Personal Computer 

Highest performance 
* 48 K lowest price 

* 16 Colours r 

* Multiple Resolution Graphics 

* Split screen modes 


mi 


£595 

+ VAT 


FOR 


PAPER 


DISK¬ 

ETTES, 


|| BITS 


RIBBONS 
for most 
printers 

LABELS M 


LATEST 
SECOND 

- HAND 
PRICES 
Ring: 0225- 
334659 


BOOKS 


SOFT¬ 
WARE, 


MONITORS 


ITlicroSfijffe 

29 Belvedere, Lansdown Road, Bath. 

Telephone: (0225) 334659. 


all this and 
much much 
more . 


k VISA M 


10 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 












































NEW PRODUCTS NEW PRODUCTS NEW PRODUCT 


FULFIL L'EMPEROR'S EURO-DREAM 


NAPOLEON 



A ravaged continent awaits the 
tread of your armies' boots when 
you try to recreate the con¬ 
quests of France's 19th Century 
Emperor, Napoleon. 

The computer organises the 
defence as the armies of Austria, 
Britain, Spain, Portugal, Russia 
and Prussia prepare to thwart 
your ambitions. 

The power-hungry Emperor 
Napoleon, has since been hailed 
as "the first European." 

His aim was to conquer the 


main European countries and be 
lord and master from his beloved 
mother country, France. 

To carry out your task there 
are six French armies at your 
disposal. 

The computer's armies start 
off from their respective coun¬ 
tries except the British one 
which begins its manoeuvres 
from Iberia or Prussia, for ease of 
troop movement. 


You begin the wars in June 
1798, and have a time limit of 17 
years imposed on you in which to 
complete Napoleon's ambition. 

Troops take a long time to 
move being without fast means 
of transport. Weather conditions 
have to be taken into account 
when moving troops either into 
battle or to a new camp location. 
Historically Napoleon's big blun¬ 
der was to make ah army march 
on Russia in winter, when the 
troops were ill-equipped to cope 
with the conditions. 

Napoleon is the appropriate 
name of the game. It runs on a 
Tandy TRS-80 in 16K and is avail¬ 
able from Molimerx. It is only out 
in tape form for the price of 
£11.97. 


FLIPPER 
FLICKING 
FOR THE 
FAMILY 

PINBALL 

Invent your own pinball machine 
design to make the most of your 
flipper-flicking skills. 

Pinball wizards are given their 
chance to improve on arcade 
designs in the latest cassette for 
the new Tandy TRS-80 Colour 
Computer. 

A feature of the game is that 
you can decide how many flip¬ 
pers you want, where they 
should be positioned and how 
difficult or easy the finished 
game is and then try it out on the 


rest of the family. 

Pinball incorporates all the 
features of the classic arcade 
game, you have to judge the best 
angle to hit the ball in order to 
make the best improvement to 
your score. 

The game is for up to four 
players and you can try it out for 
yourself at the Which Computer? 
Show in a competition which 
offers the Colour Computer as a 
prize. 

All the entry money collected 
will be donated to the Muscular 
Dystrophy Group and will be 
spent on more electronic aids for 
medical research. Hopes are high 
for piles of cash as the show 
organiser Clapp & Poliak is to 
match the sum raised on 
competition entry fees. 

If you fancy a go the show is 
on from 19-22 January at 
Birmingham's National Exhibition 
Centre. The Pinball cassette 
costs £22.95 from your Tandy 
dealer. 


HAZARDS 
ON THE 
FAIRWAY 

GOLF 

Holler "Four" if you hit a way¬ 
ward shot in the most recent golf 
game on the computer scene. 

And then cross your fingers 
and hope none of the crowd have 
wandered into the path of your 
ball. 

This is one of the hazards in 
Program Power's Golf cassette, 
which strives towards new fron¬ 
tiers of fairway realism. The 
player is invited to take part in a 
championship golf tournament, 
he has an imposing selection of 
clubs to choose from and a 
variety of wind and ground condi¬ 
tions to overcome. 


Vies HELP 
YOU TUNE 
MORE 
EASILY 

TUNESMITH 

Gary Numan has brought elec¬ 
tronic music back into vogue and 
now the Commodore VIC-20 is 
bringing similar sounds into your 
front room. 

All you need is the latest 
music pack called the VIC 
Tunesmith and you are ready to 
rock. This piece of software will 
impress the musicians in the fam¬ 
ily and make better use of the 
VIC-20's sounds facility. 

Study the manual that comes 
with the machine — there is a 
section listing musical notes 
complete with true notes, flat 
notes and sharps. Each has a 
number assigned to it which the 
computer understands and by 
typing that in via the keyboard 
you can write your own piece of 
music. 

Tunesmith has a capacity for 
99 note melodies and you can 
add in a suitable drum beat and 
set the speed of the tune you 
create. If, when you play it back, 
there are a few notes that make 
you wince don't worry — there's 
a special editing facility which 
allows you to replace the out-of¬ 
tune notes or delete them 
altogether. 

From the VIC Centre, Tune¬ 
smith is a recent addition to the 
VIC software range and costs 
£5.95. 


The wind speed changes to 
make the game more challenging 
as you have to judge the power 
behind your shot accordingly. It 
also effects the direction. 

Watch out for obstacles on the 
course. There are awkward bun¬ 
kers and clumps of trees border 
the fairway. 

You even have rent-a-crowd 
on hand to bolster your confi¬ 
dence when you hit a good putt 
but be careful not to knock them 
out. 

Golf is available for Nascom 
machines and has a price tag of 
£7.95. 



















ELECTRONIC GAMES 


CHESS COMPUTERS 





ATARI 

T.V. 

GAME 


SPACE INVADERS 


The most popular T7V. Game on 
the market with a range of over 
40 cartridges including SPACE £ Q(T 
INVADERS with over 
lames on one cartridge. me vat 


ft A A ft ft ft 

f£l iffi (St iSl 

'x' v v v v y 

n n n n 

' » 5» 

A 

A fc A 


| Hand-held Invaders Games available £19.95 | 
+ Invaders Cartridges available to fit 
ATARI RADOFIN/ACETRONIC/PHILIPS G7000 
+ Cartridges also available for 
MA TTEL/TELENG/ROWTRON/ 

DA TABASE/INTERTON 


We carry a range of over 15 
different Chess computers: 
Electronic Chess £29.95 

Chess Traveller £39.95 

iChess Challenger 7 £79.00 

Sensory 8 £119.00 

Sensory Voice £259.00 

SPECIAL OFFERS: 

VOICE CHESS CHALLENGER 
Normal Price £245 NOW £1 35.00 
SARGON 2.5/BORIS 2.5 
Normal Price £273.70 NOW £199.95 
AH prices include V.A.T. 


ADDING MACHINE 

OLYMPIA HHP 1010 

Normal Price £57.21 

NOW REDUCED TO: 


TELETEXT 



ADD-ON 

ADAPTOR 


£199 

inc. VAt 


THE RADOFIN TELETEXT ADD-ON 
ADAPTOR 

Plug the adaptor into the aerial socket of your 
colour T V. and receive the CEEFAX and 
ORACLE television information services 
THIS NEW MODEL INCORPORATES: 

* Double height character facility 
" True PAL Colour 

* Meets latest BBC & IBA broadcast specifications 

* Push button channel change 

* Unnecessary to remove the unit to watch normal 
TV programmes 

* Gold-plated circuit board for reliability 

* New SUPERIMPOSE News Flash facility 


.50 VAT 

Teach your child to 
spell properly with 
this unique learning 
aid. Fully automatic 
features and scoring. 
Additional word 
modules available to 
extend the range of 
words. 



£34 


nc. 


VAT 

Uses ordinary paper! 

No need to buy expensive 
thermal paper! 

Fast add listing PRINTER/ 
CALCULATOR. 2 lines per 
second, 10 digit capacity. 
Uses normal adding 
machine rolls. Battery or 
mains operated. 

Size 9'/4"x4 6 /8"x2 3 /8" 
(Mains adaptor extraI ^ 


24 TUNE 

ELECTRONIC DOOR 
BELL 

Normal Price £1 9.70 

NOW REDUCED TO: 


MATTEL T.V. GAME^ 


( 




£12 


HAND HELD GAMES 

EARTH INVADERS 


,70 me. VAT 
Plays 24 different tunes 
with separate speed 
control and volume 
control. Select the most 
appropriate tune for your 
visitor, with appropriate 
tunes for different times of 
the year! 


The most advanced T V game in the world 20 
cartridges available Add 

on KEYBOARD coming^ | MM _mc - 
soon to convert the A# M, *#.95 VAT| 
MATTEL to a home computer with 16K RAM, fully 
expandable and programmable in Microsoft Basic 
^Other accessories will be available later in the year 4 


These invaders are a breed of creature hitherto 
unknown to man. They cannot be killed by 
traditional methods — they must be buried. The 
battle is conducted in a maze where squads of 
aliens chase home troops. The only way of 
eliminating them is by f— 

digging holes and* M ^ MH » 
^burying them A+Smm VA 


HAND HELD GAMES 


IGALAXY 
1000 



The 2nd generation Galaxy Invader. The invaders 
have re grouped and have a seemingly endless 
supply of spacecraft whilst the player's arsenal is 
limited to just 250 missiles to be launched from 3 
missile stations. You have to prevent the invaders 
landing or from a 

destroying your home Ai I %■ 

^defences JU1 VlVVy/|7J 


THE OLYMPIA — POST OFFICE APPROVED 

TELEPHONE ANSWERING MACHINE 

WITH REMOTE CALL-IN BLEEPER 

This telephone answering machine is manufactured by Olympia Business Machines, one of the 
largest Office Equipment manufacturers in the U K It is fully POST OFFICE APPROVED and will 
answer and record messages for 24 hours a day. With your remote call-in bleeper you can receive 
these messages by telephone.wherever you are in the world. The remote call-in bleeper activates the 
Answer/Record Unit, which will at your command repeat messages, keep or erase them, and is 
activated from anywhere in the world, or on your return to your home or office. The machine can also 
be used for message referral, if you have an urgent appointment, but are expecting an important call, 
simply record the 'phone number' and location where you can be reached. With optional extra 

bleepers (£13 each) this facility can be 
extended to colleagues and members of 
the family. Using a C90 standard cassette 
you can record as many as 45 messages. 
The announcement can be up to 16 
seconds long and the incoming message 
up to 30 seconds long 
The machine is easy to install and comes 
with full instructions. It is easily wired to 
your junction box with the spade connec¬ 
tors provided or alternatively a jack plug 
can be provided to plug into a jack socket 
Most important, of course, is the fact that 
it is fully POST OFFICE APPROVED. 

The price of £1 35 (inc. VAT) includes the 
machine, an extra-light remote call-in 
Bleeper, the microphone message tape, 
A/C mains adaptor. The unit is 
9 3 /4''x6"x2V2" and is fully guaranteed for 
1 2 months. The telephone can be placed 
directly on the unit — no additional desk 
space is required, 


PRESTEL 

VIEWDATA 



£135 


The ACE TELCOM VDX1000 Prestel View¬ 
data adaptor simply plugs into the aerial 
socket of your television and enables you to 
receive the Prestel/Viewdata service in 
colour or black & white. 

Features 

- Simplified controls for quick, easy operation 
Special graphics feature for high resolution 

— State-of-the-art microprocessor controller 
Standard remote telephone keypad with Prestel 
keys * # 

Auto dialler incorporated for easy Prestel 
acquisition 

— True PAL colour encoder using reliable 1C — 
chroma filter and dela line incorporated for 
minimum picture interference/maximum 
fidelity 

— Includes convenient TV — Prestel switchbox 
Easily connected to standard home or office 
telephone lines 

— Fully Post Office approved 

SPECIAL 
L PRICE 


% E ,Srt 228.85 


FOR FREE BROCHURES -TEL: 01-3011111 



12 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 
















































































COMPETITION 


7D 

5 



TEN WAYS TO USE 
A TEMPLATE 

"A comb for Telly Savalas," said G. D. 

Ray of Merley, Wimborne in Dorset 
and on a judge's whim he was 
awarded a prize. To give Mr. Ray his 
due, this use of a template was more 
sensible than most of the ideas we 
received. 

In a similar vein was Joe Hanley s 
suggestion that we paint a buckle on 
one end and use it as a fashion belt 
for Twiggy. But this was not topical 
enough for our judge, so instead she 
chose his second idea, that the tem¬ 
plate would make a great beer clarity 
tester. Puzzled? Well so were we, but 
Mr. Hanley elucidated with instruc¬ 
tions: (1) place template in pint glass. 

(2) Read words in red letters. (3) 
Check against following chart: 
clearly visible, light ale; very vague, 
brown ale; impossible to see, Guin¬ 
ness. 

Yes it really works, impressed we 
despatched a T-shirt to Nelson in 
Lancs. 

The byte-ing cynicism prize went to 
Keith Parker of Crook, Co. Durham, 
whose entry read: “(1) Take template. 

Fold twice down length to produce a 
strip 1" x 2". (2) Wedge this under 
Sinclair 16K RAM pack... presto! 

The dreaded RAM pack wobble is 
cured — words fail me (sorry Uncle 
Clive, we all love you really.)" 

Where does the cynicism come in? 
Well somewhere. The prize: one of 
our T-shirts. 

Anthony Hood of Kilburn, Derby¬ 
shire gave us a rhyme: "This piece of 
plastic, 8" x 1"; A computer shall be 
stuck thereon; So when I puzzle, 
curse and list; I think of C.&V.G., the 

■BRAINWARE 

The answer to our January Mind 
Routines is that the triangular 
pyramid has 4, 6 and 8 layers, 
which gives you 20, 56 and 120 
balls. 

The square pyramid has 1, 5 
and 7 layers which gives you 1, 

55 and 140 balls. 

The Nevera Crossword solu¬ 
tion is printed right and we will 
publish the names of the win¬ 
ners next month. 

This month's Brainware prob¬ 
lems can be found on page 83. 


When we gave away a free 
template with our second 
issue, we little realised what 
strange perverted uses the 
poor defenceless pieces of 
plastic would be put to. 

Trained only in the art of 
helping readers to key-in our 
games program listings, the 
templates may be hard- 
pressed to fulfil some of the 
tasks you planned for them. 

Innocently we asked, 
"What other uses could you 
find for a free template?" And 



greatest; And about the T-shirt I won; 
With those lovable Bugs displayed 
upon; Otherwise Til probably use it to 
set the gap on my spark plugs." 

And you thought Keats was good! 

Anthony wins our Great McGon- 
agall Poetry prize — a T-shirt. We 
are currently investigating claims that 
Anthony is a part-time Vogan space¬ 
ship captain. 

No such doubt exists in the case of 
Kevin Etheridge — who freely admits 
his alien origins. Apparently the tern- 


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in implicit detail you told us! 
After we had thrown those out 
we were still left with a few 
bizarre suggestions and from 
these we picked our 10 lucky 
winners of Bugs T-shirts. 

The winning entries are 
presented below and should 
not be read by anyone who is 
feeling in a delicate state. 
Our judge has given up trying 
to explain her choice of 
T-shirt winners and is un¬ 
available to anyone trying to 
contest the decision. 


plate was the answer to his dreams — 
mainly to get off this "dungball of a 
world" and back to his native planet. 
Kevin linked the template into his 
Bambletrundite Generator (mk. 4) via 
the automatic quark-influx module to 
reverse the polarity on the poly¬ 
chronic infundibulator and enabled 
him to disappear into hyperspace. 
Before he goes, Kevin will be hanging 
on for his T-shirt at Dalgety Bay, 
Dunfermline — he is a "large-size” 
alien. 

D. R. Cowap of Letchworth, Herts 
came up with the artistic suggestion 
of using the template as a De-Bugging 
device (left). 

Robin Hill came up with several 
suggestions, the most sensible of 
which, was: "Memorise this contour 
so you'll recognise a straight line 
when you see one." 

He claims his address as: The 
Stress Office, British Aerospace, 
Brough, N. Humberside. 

Removing the skin off old rice pud¬ 
ding, was the simple and practical 
idea put forward by Simon Hodgson of 
Gateshead, Tyne-and-Wear. 

Just to prove there is nothing sexist 
about this magazine (although all the 
Bugs are male) our penultimate win¬ 
ner was Linda Evans of Burgess Hill, 
West Sussex. 

Linda reckons the template is ideal 
for removing her pet parrot's little 
offerings from the carpet — leaving no 
trace! Linda assures us that the tem¬ 
plate is thoroughly wiped before 
being returned to keying-in duty. 

And finally, Simon Young of Clap¬ 
ton, London E5, reckons Adam Ant 
uses a template to draw the make-up 
lines across his face. 

And if you think these 10 were bad 
— at least they were printable. We 
hope we haven't given you too many 
ideas. 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 13 















































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HOM€ & BUSIN€SS €NTHUSIRST 


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ALL ONLY £4.95 


PACK 16/2 includes all of: 

ADVENTURE ATLANTIC: You may become very rich or 
you may be marooned forever; BREAKOUT: SQUASH 
PRACTICE: TRANSLATOR: translates any European 
language to any other, vocab on cassette; 
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ALL ONLY £4.95 


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TAPEBOOK 50 version 3 


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39 Gloucester Rd, Gee Cross, Hyde, Cheshire SK14 5JG 
061-368 7558 


C^tech — Big ideas for small computer — all software 
by return of post!! 




























































PET 

SOFTWARE 

9IATMM ATTACK 

The Diatrons are a mean bunch of aliens. They have no use 
for what they are stealing from you (your diamonds), but 
nevertheless, their guiding principle is to 'steal first' and ask 
questions later. 

This offends your moral standards so much that you have no 
hesitation in using your terrible spikes. 

See them beam down and squawk. Sharpen up your reflexes 
and beat back the waves of descending Diatrons. 

16K (New Rom) 

£8.95 

0ub <£omman&e* 

This is not an Arcade type game but it is a real time graphics 
simulation of the commander of a World War II sub. Your 
mission as commander is to seek out and destroy enemy 
shipping, both warship and merchantmen. 

The merchantmen are not always sitting ducks as Q ships are 
also encountered but radar, periscopes, hydrophone, etc., 
with a good visual display enable you to hunt effectively. 
Don't forget to contact your supply ship as running out of 
fuel or ammunition is rather embarrassing to a commander 
in line for the IRON CROSS. 

GOOD HUNTING 

32K and 16K versions (New Rom) 

Please specify £13.95 

CONQUEROR 

A tyrant is sweeping through Europe unopposed. 

GORVAN THE TERRIBLE is well named. You have been put in 
command of the armies which control the few remaining 
countries of the alliance. 

Mere survival will be difficult but your task is to eradicate 
GORVAN from the face of Europe. 

The prize? — fame and glory 

To fail? — Gorvan is indeed terrible 

A game of tactics and strategy played with excellent graphi¬ 
cal representation of Europe. 

16K (New Rom) 

£12.95 


AVALON HILL GAMES 

Nuke Ware 

Nuclear War between two countries, missiles, fighters, bom¬ 
bers, ABMs, etc. 

Planet Miners (1-4 Players) 

Compete to claim mining rights for Solar System. 

North Atlantic Convoy Raider 

Sink the Bismark or (if you prefer) the British Convoy. 

All above TRS80 16k level II cassette at £10.95. 


ASTEROIDS 


Fast action Pet version of popular arcade type game 
'Asteroids'. All the facilites, Rotate, Fire, Hyperspace, Jump. 

(Old and New Rom) 
on one cassette 

8k £9.95 


TRS-80, APPLE 

SOFTWARE 

Are you fed up with games where you just shoot a few 
invaders or depend on your reactions, then try a whole new 
world of computer fantasy, a world in which Sorcery and 
Monsters holds sway, try: 

SORCERER 
OF SIVA 

A real-time GRAPHIC adventure 

Sorcerer of Siva is a game where you enter a different world 
where Amulets, rings, necklaces, sceptres — and — oh, yes, 
a pair of old boots await you — in the magical mines of Siva. 

Enter the dark stillness of the mine, armed with just a 
dagger and relying on your magical abilities. But beware of 
the wandering soulless creatures that dwell in the magical 
mine, guarding every treasure and trap door. 

Use your magical powers to slay the bloodthirsty banshee, 
put an end to the deadly demon, or the goblin waiting to 
waylay you. 

Walk through wails and sealed entrances, cast a spell to 
heal your wounds, regain your strength or hurl bolts of 
lightning. 

A wizard you are, yes, but watch out for the evil Sorcerer 
who is waiting to cast his favourite spell — forgetfulness — 
to deprive you of your most valuable magic. 

But all is not lost — you may regain a spell or two, or 
perhaps even one new to you — if you can discover the 
wondrous touchstones, stone saturated with powers to 
restore your magical abilities. Be warned too, that not all 
treasures you might find are true. In experience lies wisdom. 

£15.95 TRS-80 & V.G. (level II, 16k) cassette 
£17.95 TRS-80 (32k TRSDOS), Apple (48k with Applesoft in 
ROM) 

The Upper Reaches of Apshai . . . 

... is the first in a series of expansion modules for "The 
Temple". Horrible monsters lurk in the innkeeper's backyard. 
Discover the secrets of Benedic's Monastery and the cottage 
of Merlis the Mage. Who knows what secrets the cellar of 
Olias holds. 

Over 150 new rooms for you to explore. 

The Keys of Acheron 

For those of you who have succeeded in rescuing Brynhild as 
the Hellfire Warrior, now have an even more difficult task; 
Four magical jewels, the keys, each in a different dimension, 
must be recovered from Kronus the Demon. 

Both The Upper Reaches of Apshai and The Keys of 
Acheron are expansion modules for the Temple and Hellfire, 
you must have these games to play them. 

£11.95 TRS-80 & V.G. (level II, 16k) cassette 

Temple of Apshai £16.95 
Hellfire Warrior £16.95 

SPECIAL OFFER: If you don't have Temple or 

Hellfire, then purchase both Temple and The Upper Reaches 
of Apshai or Hellfire Warrior and the Keys of Acheron for just 

£ 24.95 Cass. £ 26.95 disk. 


All prices Include p & p and V.A. T. 


^Algray 

ALGRAY House, 33 Bradbury Street, Barnsley, South Yorkshire. 
Tel: Barnsley (0226) 83199 


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COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 15 














A common myth — especially 
among non-players — is that 
expert chessplayers and chess¬ 
playing programs somehow look 
at every possible variation in the 
game. 

A little analysis shows that 
this cannot possibly be so. In the 
initial starting position for 
chess, White has a choice of 20 
moves (16 pawn moves and four 
knight moves). Whichever move 
he plays, Black has a choice of 20 
replies, making a total of 20 x 20 
- 400 possible combinations of 
one move on each side, includ¬ 
ing such unlikely combinations 
as 1.P-QR4, P-KR4 and 1.P-KB3, 
N-QR3. For subsequent moves 
each side is likely to have 
perhaps 30 alternative choices 



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on average until quite late in the 
game. Thus we can reasonably 
estimate the number of possible 
ways of playing just the first 
three moves for each side by 
20x20x30x30x30x30 = 324 mil¬ 
lion! 

The so-called "combinatorial 
explosion" of variations is one of 
the greatest obstacles to writing 
almost all game-playing prog¬ 
rams. Nevertheless, it is 
extremely helpful to start by 
thinking in terms of exhaustive 
analysis, stopping only when a 
position is a checkmate or a 
"defined" draw (a stalemate of 
inadequate material for either 
side to checkmate), since this 
leads to an elegant method of 
move selection, known as the 
minimax algorithm. This, in mod- 




By Max Bramer 


ified form, is used in virtually all 
programs to play chess, go, 
draughts and similar two-person 
games. It is easiest to illustrate 
the method by a simpler exam¬ 
ple than chess and I have taken 
the humble game of noughts and 
crosses as an example. 

In the position marked 1, it is 
X's move and he has three 
choices shown as positions 2, 3 
and 4. Number 3 is terminal and 
a win for X. In numbers 2 and 4 it 
is O's move, to positions 5, 6, 7 or 
8. Position 6 is also terminal and 
a win for O. Following every 
sequence of moves through to 
either a win for X, a win for O, or 
a draw gives the complete figure 
which is called a game tree. 
Notice that only terminal posi¬ 
tions 3, 6, 9, 10, 11 are labelled 
as a win or draw. 

However, every other position 
can now be labelled (working 
from the bottom of the tree 
upwards) in a straightforward 
way. Numbers 5 and 8 must be 
draws and 7 is a win for X since 
there is only one legal move 
each time. 

Now look at position 2. It is O's 
move and he can either move to 
5, a draw, or 6 a win for O. Since 
it is O's move he will choose the 
best alternative from his own 
viewpoint, in this case 6. So 2 is 
also a win for O. In the same 
way 4 is a draw, since O will 
certainly avoid playing to 7 and 
losing. Finally consider position 
1. Now it is X's move and the 
choice is between 2 (a win for O), 
3 (a win for X) and 4 (a draw). He 
naturally will choose 3 and so 
the original position 1 is a win — 
as is obvious at a glance — with 
the best move being to 3. 

The same method would work 
equally well for any size of game 
tree, with any number of levels, 
provided the players move alter¬ 
nately, as they do in chess. 

The first step towards a solu¬ 
tion is to extend the idea of a 
score. Instead of just win, draw 
or loss, every position is given a 


numerical value, e.g. -f 100 for a 
large White advantage, -3 for a 
small Black advantage (it is con¬ 
venient always to score from 
White's viewpoint). Of course, 
this is much less precise and 
requires a great deal of judge¬ 
ment to do even reasonably well 
(how does a weak pawn balance 
against a strongly centralised 
queen?) 

Just as in the noughts and 
crosses example, the score of the 
initial position being analysed 
can be computed by "backing- 
up" values, level by level. Figure 
two shows an example, analys¬ 
ing just one move for each side. 
Note that all scores are taken 
from White's point of view, so 
negative scores are favourable 
to Black. 



The values —8, -3 etc. are 
scores assigned to the final posi¬ 
tion, i.e. those where analysis 
stops. In positions 2, 3 and 4 it is 
Black's move. In 2, he will play to 
5 since a value of ^8 is better 
than ~3 or -2 from his view¬ 
point. Thus 2 has a score of ~8 
and similarly 3 and 4 should 
score +5 and “4, respectively, 
with Black always playing to 
minimise the score of the result¬ 
ing position. From White's view¬ 
point, in position 1, it is best to 
maximise the score he can 
obtain, thus he chooses to play 
to 3, value +5, not 2, value -8 or 
4, value —4. The same alterna¬ 
tion of White maximising and 
Black minimising would again 
work with any number of levels 
and, not surprisingly, is called 
the minimax algorithm. Using the 
minimax algorithm does not 
solve the combinatorial explo¬ 
sion, since even looking two or 
three moves ahead for each side 
gives a vast number of positions, 
but it is an invaluable start. 


16 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 































































PLAVFORTODAY 


COMMODORE VIC 



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0 Standard PETBASIC 0 Full sized Typewritei 
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• Self Teaching Materials LlOa.JJ 

VIC Compatible Cassette £44.95 



• 8K Rom + 4K Ram 0 Sound 
0 20 Introductory Programs 
0 Built-in Colour 


£199.00 



VIDEO GENIE I 

• Machine Language monitor 
0 Sound and Lower Case 
0 Renumber and Screen Print 


£344.00 


TRS80 

MODEL 

III 


048 K User Ram 0 Extended Microsoft Basic 
0 Parallel or RS232 Interfaces 
0 With 40 Track Single 
Density Disk Drives 
0 With 80 Track Double 
Sided Disk Drives 
• With 80 Track Double 
Densi t v Dri ves 1.4MB 



TEAC 

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0 Interfaces with Video Genie, North Star Horizon, 
Superbrain Nascom etc. 

040 Track Single ~ 040 Track.Double f 

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080 Track Single 080 Track Double f 

Disk Drive £344.00 Disk Drive £599.00 


£1596.00 

£1741.00 

£1999.00 



SHARP 
MZ80K 

048K User RAM 
0 Extended Basic 

£399.00 


\ Hin C-0T \: n J I InK 

Computer Shack Ltd.14. Pittville Street.Cheltenham. Glos.Telephone:(0242)584343 

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Access or Barclay Card Accepted, Mailorder Enquiries Welcomed. rnces IIlLlUUtJ vni 


WOODLAND 

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MAIL ORDER MICROCOMPUTER 
SUPPLIES FOR THE APPLE 



Wizadry 48K P £29.90 

Galactic Attack 48K P £17.25 

Doom Cavern 48K 1/A £12.65 

Odyssey 48K 1 £17.25 

Tank Attack/Death Run 48K 1/A £12.65 
Wilderness Campaign 48K A £12.65 
Wilderness & Dungeon 48K 1/A £20.70 
Mission Asteroid 48K M £11.50 

Mystery House 48K M £14.95 

Wizard & Princess 48K M £20.70 
Cranston & Manor 48K M £21.85 
Hi-Res Football 48K M £23.00 

Hi-Res Soccer 48K M £17.25 

Hi-Res Cribbage 48K M £14.37 

Missile Defense 48K M £17.25 

Sabotage 48K M £14.37 

Gobbler 48KM £14.37 

Threshold £23.00 

Soft Porn Adventure £17.25 

Ulysses & the Golden Fleece £21.85 


Epoch 48K M £20.70 

Copts & Robbers 48K M £20.70 

Outpost 48K M £17.25 

Beer Run 48K M £17.25 

Gorgon 48K M £23.00 

Sneakers 48K M £17.25 

Gamma Goblins 48K M £17.25 

Autobahn 48K M £17.25 

Orbitron 48K M £17.25 

Pulsar II 48KM £17.25 

Space Eggs 48K M £17.25 

Phantoms Five 48K M £17.25 

Cyber Strike 48K M £23.00 

Star Cruiser 32K M £14.95 

Both Barrels 48K A £14.95 

E-Z Draw 3.3 48K A £28.75 

Higher Graphics II 48K 1/A £21.85 

Higher Text 32K 1/A £21.85 

*Superscribe 48K M £82.80 

Expediter II 48K A £63.25 


*Revised Version 


16K/ZX81 SOFTWARE 

"STARTREK" 

All the usual features. 

"SUPER-WUMPAS" 

New Exciting adventure game. 

"GRAPHIC GOLF" 

A graphic implementation of computer golf. 

"3D — MYSTERY MAZE" 


A-Applesoft /-Integer 
1/A-lnteger & Applesoft 
M-Runs on any Apple 
P-Requires DOS 3.3 


UK distributors for 
Sir-Tech Inc. 

Trade enquiries invited 


Three dimensional maze game in which you have to 
make your way to the treasure. 


All software is disc based. All prices are inclusive. 

On multiple orders of 3 or more programs P&P is 
FREE; please add 50p P&P on orders less than 3. 

A list of our full range of software is free on request 
from: 

WOODLAND SOFTWARE 


"GAMES PACK I" 

Fantastic value, over 50K of program, including STAR- 
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Prices £4.95 each cassette Send S.A.E. 

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103 Oxford Gardens, London W10 6NF. 
Telephone: 01-960 4877 


SILVERSOFT (Dept CVG) 

40 Empress Avenue, Ilford, Essex. 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 17 


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TV GflMES CEMTBES TV GAMES CENTRES TV OAMESC 


KEEP THIS VHJJUN'S 
BOMBS AT BAY 


KABOOM THE MAD BOMBER 


Kaboom the Mad Bomber is an 
evil character who lives up to his 
name. 

He rules the roost at the top of 
a wall and has instant access to a 
cache of bombs which he drops 
from a great height. It's up to you 
to thwart Kaboom and literally 
wipe the smile off his face. For 
each time you let a bomb hit the 
ground it brings a wicked grin to 
his face. 

This Activision cartridge fits 
the Atari VCS and has an addic¬ 
tive quality making it hard to put 
down. At the bottom of the 
screen are three blocks which 
you can move about with your 
paddle controllers. 

Kaboom moves erratically from 
one side of the screen to the 
other and drops a series of 
bombs with lighted fuses which 
you catch with your block. 

At first the bomber moves 
slowly so there's no problem 
catching the bombs but as the 
game progresses Kaboom really 
does go mad making it a hard job 
for you to tackle. 

There are two options to vary 
the game. On the first the blocks 
are piled three high, on the sec¬ 


ond the blocks double in length 
making your task easier. 

Although the only skill in play¬ 
ing the game is having a quick 
hand to move the block across 
the screen it is an extremely 
compulsive reaction game. 

The points system is simple, 
one point for each bomb, but the 
score can quickly mount up. 

Kaboom the Mad Bomber will 
torment your life for £18.95 from 
Activision UK distributors. 



PITCHING FOR WORLD CUP PLAY 


FOOTBALL AND ICE HOCKEY 


Football fans are in for a good 
time next year with the World 
Cup in full swing. 

Games centres are well 
catered for on the football front, 
the latest to add one to its range 
is Philips for the G7000. In this 
version the match is fought out 
between two five man teams, 
each complete with a goalie. The 
men are moved around the pitch 



with the joystick and you use the 
fire or action button to shoot. 

You need a good eye for a ball 
and an alert mind to check at an 
instant where members of the 
opposing team are. If you want to 
pass the ball to another player 
just press the fire button, but be 
careful not to let it be inter¬ 
cepted by the opposition. 

The computer memory keeps 
track of the score and also clocks 
up the time left to play. When 
the action gets a bit violent and 
players suffer a few blows, the 
time is added on. 

You get value for money on 
this cartridge with the added 
game Ice Hockey included in the 
package. The principle of the 
game sticks closely to the real 
one, but the speed of the puck's 
movement is not as fast as the 
real life game. 

An extra feature written into 
Ice Hockey is that you can hold 
down the action button and 
watch the puck skim across the 
screen until it hits a player. 

The match is again timed by 
the computer and the score for 
both sides is marked up on the 
screen too. Both games run on 
the G7000 and can be bought 
now for the standard Videopac 


ANOTHER 
BRICK IN 
THE WALL 


SUPER BREAKOUT 


Being trapped in a small space 
means horror for the claus¬ 
trophobic and Super Breakout 
will have them crying out in 
anguish. 

The only way to get out of the 
dilemma is to dislodge the bricks 
above you which are four layers 
deep. On either side of these 
layers the walls hem you in so 
you are truly trapped. 

Super Breakout is one of the 
latest games for the Atari Video 
Computer System following the 
traditional version. Five different 
variations of play are included in 
the package, regular Breakout, 
Double Breakout, Cavity Break¬ 
out and Progressive Breakout. 
All for one or two players. 

At the bottom of the screen is 
a bat which you control, using 
the Atari's compatible paddles. 
When the game kicks off a ball is 
served into the play area which 
you have to bounce off your 
block to make it rebound against 
the coloured bricks at the top of 
the screen. 

Each brick you successfully 
knock out disappears from the 
screen and you are awarded 
points. 

Bricks in the first two rows of 
the regular game go for one point 
each. The second and third rows 
are worth three points each and 
the fifth and sixth ones will net 
you five per brick, and the 
seventh and eighth rows bricks 
earn you seven points each. 

Depending on the game varia¬ 
tion you play and certain stages 
reached in the play the points are 
sometimes doubled or tripled. On 
Double Breakout the maximum 
score is infinite, so you can go on 
building up a high score indefi¬ 
nitely. 

Another feature is a children's 
version making the game easier if 
you want to let the kids let rip. 
The difference is that the speed 
of the game is slowed down so 
you have more time to react and 
judge the best place to position 
your bat to hit the ball. 

The cartridge sells for £14.95, 
from Atari distributors. 









































ROCKS FOR 
ALL AGES 


BEST SELLERS 


Asteroids made the transition 
from arcade to home entertain¬ 
ment centre far more success¬ 
fully than its predecessor, Space 
Invaders. Atari came up with 
the arcade game and were first 
to include a cartridge for the 
video computer system —which 
now outsells Space Invaders — 
and it resulted in an international 
competition last November to 
find the top scorer. 

The target is 142,910 points, 
which an American player 
achieved, to win the contest. 

The asteroids hurtle through 
the cosmos, each hit splitting 
them in half, each sized rock 
being worth a certain number of 
points. The smallest ones net 
100, downwards to 10 for a giant 
rock. With the difficulty button 
on a blue flying saucer whizzes 
through the storm, firing on your 
ship. 

The spacecraft can be rotated 
left or right to fire and moved out 
of position by use of the thrust 
which propels it in the direction 
it is pointing. 

Other features incorporated 
into different versions of the 
game (there are 66) include: 
hyperspace, which transports 
you instantly out of danger to 
another area of the screen. 

In other versions you can have 
the hyperspace swapped for pro¬ 
tective shields which enable you 
to pass through asteroids, but 
these are only effective for a 
brief second and then blow you 
up if over used. And finally a 
"flip” effect enables your ship to 
spin 180° and fire at oncoming 
danger from both sides very 
quickly. 

You are given five lives to start 
off the game but extra ones are 
available every 5, 10, or 20 
thousand points, depending on 
the difficulty you set yourself. In 
later walls the large blue saucer 
is replaced by a far more deadly 
small green one who homes in on 
your ship much quicker. With 
each cleared screen more rocks 
are added to the game. 

Guaranteed to hold your atten¬ 
tion, it costs £34.50 from Atari s 
U.K. distributors. 


HELP THESE 
CHICKS CROSS 
THE ROAD 


ACTION IN THE AIR WAYS 


TRIPLE ACTION 


There's real skill when you take 
to the airways in Triple Action. 

You are in command of one of 
two planes engaged in battle 
aiming to score 15 points before 
your opponent. To score points 
you must shoot down the oppo¬ 
sition or get a direct hit at the 
balloon which begins its ascent 
from a platform in the middle of 
the screen. 

Cloud formations are dotted in 
the sky for you to use as cover if 
you want to hide from your 
opponent in the heat of a dog 
fight. Make the most of the cloud 
cover during battles. 

Your armaments consist of 
either short or long range bul¬ 
lets. , 

Battle Tanks is another of the 
games on the same Intellivision 
cartridge. 

The object is to beat an enemy 


tank by destroying it with your 
own shells. On the screen are 
positioned several walls differing 
in length as well as clumps of 
trees. The walls can be used as a 
protective shield, from enemy 
fire. But watch out if you let your 
tank lurk behind the trees, 
because those can be blasted to 
smithereens. 

Opt for the third game, Car 
Racing, and you have to race 
against the clock over a distance 
of 100 miles. Not only do you 
have to keep your car on the 
straight and narrow, but you also 
have to dodge other traffic on 
the road. 

This Triple Action cartridge is 
available from Intellivision's dis¬ 
tributors via Advanced Consumer 
Electronics (ACE) of north Lon¬ 
don for the standard price of 
£18.95. 


FREEWAY 


Why did the chicken cross the 
road? goes the old children's 
joke. 

If you found the answer 
unconvincing as a child, then you 
will find it totally implausible 
when you plug the Freeway car¬ 
tridge into your Atari Video Com¬ 
puter System. 

Two chickens are in a race to 
get to the other side of a 10 lane 
motorway which is jam-packed 
with traffic. Every time you man¬ 
age to dodge the cars and lorries 
and successfully cross the 10 
lanes you score a point. 

There are two levels of diffi¬ 
culty and eight different game 
versions, in each one the traffic 
speeds up slightly. You cant 
judge when to leap out into the 
roads because the cars and lor¬ 
ries' speeds are randomly gener¬ 
ated. The lower numbered game 
variations are only plagued by 
cars rather than lorries which 
makes the traffic easier to jump. 
On version eight the freeway is 
filled with heavy lorries. 

You use the joystick to 
manoeuvre your chicken across 
the road, but you can only move 
him up or down, not sideways. 

Freeway is one of the latest 
cartridges out for use on the 
Atari games centre and is made 
by the US firm Activision. It will 
cost you £18.95. 


TAKE YOUR CUE FROM THE U.S. 

_ - , . . ...I_4.U~ (irot nor. 


BILLIARDS 


Potting the coloured balls in the 
pockets of a snooker table is a 
real test of your judgement of 
distance and angles. 

Line up your cue in one of two 
snooker table games just 
released for the Philips G7000 
television games centre. Eight 
Ball and Rotation are versions of 
two popular American games 
translated for a British audience. 

In Eight Ball the idea is to pot 
the two dark balls which lie in a 
10 ball triangle..The option is 
open for you to try and beat the 
computer or to challenge a 


friend. Whoever is the first per¬ 
son to put the two dark balls in 
the pockets wins. 

Rotation is also played with 10 
balls. But this time there are five 
blue ones and five yellow, exclud¬ 
ing the cue ball. The aim is to 
pocket as many balls as possible. 
If you get bored with that you 
can design your own variation. 
Why not put a value on the 
different balls, or try pocketing 
alternating coloured balls, or how 
about each player opting to put 
down a certain colour? The deci¬ 
sion is yours. 

Coming in one cartridge Eight 
Ball and Rotation costs £15. 









































By Tom Napier 


SCREENING 
YOUR PROGRAM 


There are plenty of practical 
problems which crop up when 
putting the game of Reversi on a 
computer screen. 

Leaving the actual program¬ 
ming of the machine to play a 
good game aside for a moment, 
in just representing Reversi on a 
screen there are several 
guidelines which can help in the 
presentation of the game. 

The problem arises when one 
tries to show a board and 
pieces on a screen, since almost 
every computer has its own 
unique way of doing this. 

The method I used was to draw 
the fixed information such as the 
board and its square numbering 
using Basic PRINT statements 
and then to POKE the pieces into 
the correct memory locations to 
make them appear on the board. 

This is much quicker than 
reprinting the whole display 
after each move. 

My board is pale blue with 
dark blue lines dividing the 
squares. The machine plays 
with blue pieces and the human 
player with red ones. One after¬ 
thought that turned out to be 
essential was to make each 
newly placed piece flash for 
several seconds. Without this, it 
was difficult to spot where the 
computer had moved, particu¬ 
larly once it had started turning 
over the pieces. 

However, it's not impossible to 
write a Reversi program on a 
non-graphic monochrome com¬ 
puter, it's just a little slower and 
not so pretty. 

The strategy my program uses 
is: for every unoccupied square, 
test to see if a legal move is 
possible. If it is, evaluate the 
move and compare it with the 
best move found so far. Save the 
better move. 

After testing all the squares, 
play the best move found. Turn 


Reversi is the old English name for 
the board game which has recently 
become popular as Othello since 
being re-invented in Japan. 

As Othello is the trade name for 
the game we have decided to revert 
to calling our column "Reversi" as 
this is the name frequently given to 
computerised versions of the game. 


over all the appropriate pieces 
then wait for the human player's 
response. Test that the human 
player's move is legal and dis¬ 
play the new board position if it 
is. Repeat until either both 
players pass on successive 
moves or move 65 is reached. 
Add up totals of both players and 
announce winner. 

I have glossed over the move 
evaluation routine. A simple 
program will use two Basic 
arrays, one 10 by 10 to represent 
the state of the board and 
another that contains the 
desirability factors assigned to 
each square. The board state 
array is 10 x 10 in size simply to 
enable the edge of the board to 
be indicated to the legal move 
testing routine. 

The same routine is used to 
check the legality of both 
player's moves by changing the 
value of the flag "P". Assuming 
the square concerned is un¬ 
occupied it goes like this. For 
direction 1 to 8, keep stepping 
out so long as only opposing 
pieces are encountered. If a 
space or the board edge is found, 
try the next direction, if a 
friendly piece is found in a direc¬ 


tion that contains at least one 
opposing piece then the move is 
legal. It's shorter in Basic than in 
English! 

To evaluate a move the routine 
adds twice the value of the 
square played on to the sum of 
values of the pieces captured. 
The values assigned, which 
should be varied by anyone 
experimenting with the pro¬ 
gram, reflect such factors as the 
desirability of corner and edge 
squares and the relative unde¬ 
sirability of squares that enable 
one's opponent to make a corner 
or edge move. 

Towards the end of the game, 
positions are relatively 
unimportant and only sheer 
numbers matter, this is reflected 
by resetting all the values to 1 for 
the last few moves. 

A more complicated program 
could try resetting the values to 
reflect the position of the pieces, 
for example: once a corner has 
been taken, the squares next to 
the corners could have a higher 
value assigned to them. 

Only legal moves should be 
fully evaluated but even so the 
computer will take 15 to 25 sec¬ 
onds to make up its mind. First 
attempts should not try to 
make the machine look at its 
opponent's possible responses, 
it would just take too long. 

One compromise I have 
worked on but not yet completed 
is to write the move examination 
routines in machine code while 
still using Basic for the rest of the 
program. This would speed 
things up enormously. 
































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COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 21 









































































































Space craft and alien beings were 
the preserve of the science fiction 
enthusiast long before they began 
appearing on our computer screens. 

Sci-fi also has a long tradition for 
being the most innovative family in 
the literary clan. We thought we 
should tap this source of new ideas 
and invited author David Langford of 
the Science Fiction foundation to 
lead us gently into the diverse 
futures imagined by the latest sci¬ 
ence fiction authors. 

David will sift through the latest 
ideas and reproduce the best of 
these and provide some greatly 
appreciated humour on the way. 

In his first column, David looks at 
one way for beginners to approach 
giving a game a science fiction feel 
and presents a simple example, 
Space Blockade. 


New computer owners may well 
be alarmed by the awesome 
accuracy seemingly needed to 
prepare a lengthy Basic pro¬ 
gram. 

Ignoring the frowns of the pur¬ 
ists (the ones who have no time 
for you unless you can write 
fluent machine code while 
standing on your head in a thun¬ 
derstorm), let's look at how to 
cheat — to work up a half-baked 
idea into a tiny but operational 
computer game without any vast 
planning. You might call it com¬ 
puter doodling. 

My wife, disgruntled by pick¬ 
eting at her office, suggested a 
game where you had to steer 
small unfortunate non-union 
people though immense and 
menacing picket lines. Thus, one 
non-sober evening, the game of 
"Flying Pickets" came into 
being. Let's not deal with such 
politically sensitive matters but 
with the almost indistinguish¬ 
able game called "Space Block¬ 
ade" which I've just invented out 
of sheer cowardice. 

A horde of evil extraterres¬ 
trials hangs over the Earth. Our 
planet is doomed and must be 
evacuated. One by one Earth's 
brave little ships boost into 
space, only to perish miserably 
by collision with the aliens' 
invulnerable force screens . . . 
unless you steer between them. 

Obviously this is dead easy 
unless the fiendish baddies keep 
on the move. One simple- 
minded way of doing this on my 


COMPUTER 


BY DAVID LANGFORD 



TRS-80 is to make up a long 
string by adding up CHR graph¬ 
ics: you PRINT this, and because 
it is such a long string it first 
prints the top halves of all these 
invaders and then wraps round 
to the next line to print the bot¬ 
tom halves — giving them a 
sinister wriggling motion when 
they move as described below. 
Repeat to give three spaced-out 
rows of looming invaders, each 


send up through that lot is a 
mere "little moving blot" steered 
by the arrow keys: easy to 
arrange on any machine, using a 
function like INKEY to read in the 
steering instructions. You'll 
know what comes next: the ship 
starts at horizontal position X 
and vertical (measured from the 
top) position Y somewhere near 
bottom centre of the screen, and 


row starting at the left-hand 
edge of the screen and reaching 
not all the way across. 

Repeat the PRINT again and 
again for all three, stepping up 
the TAB function or equivalent to 
overprint and have these block¬ 
ade lines shuffle a space to the 
right each time. When they 
reach the right-hand edge you 
can start them moving back 
again. Three rows of monstrous 
Things sidling to and fro in the 
sky. 

The simplest "Earth ship" to 


moves depending on which 
arrow key was last pressed. 

If it was the up-arrow then the 
new Y must be made on less 
than the old one; the graphics 
blot at X,Y is turned off and that 
at X,Y-1 turned on . . . and so on 
in a loop until a different arrow 
key is pressed. 

If you go straight up like that, 
the chances are that sooner or 
later you hit one of the Things in 
the sky, and are blown to 
smithereens. The program 
should test the new point X,Y on 
the display before turning it on 


22 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



















DIDDLING 


to move the "ship" there: if it's 
already occupied; then 
blooie! You can set various levels 
of difficulty by letting your ship 
move twice, five times, 10 times 
for each move of the blockaders 
— have an endless loop for the 
moving invaders, say, and an 
inner FOR-NEXT loop handling 
the movements of the ship. 

Finally, tidy the game up. Fan¬ 
fares if you get through the block¬ 
ade to the top of the screen. A 
counter giving the player (say) 10 
ships. A score display in some 
handy corner: 4 ships escaped , 3 
lost , 3 to launch. A trap to prevent 
people sneaking round the block¬ 
aders when they're at far left or 
right of the screen — if the hori¬ 
zontal position X gets too small 
or too large the program blows 


you up anyway for, er . . . using 
too much fuel. 

A preliminary display of 
instructions so those unfamiliar 
with the game can sit down and 
play without a PhD in computer 
science. "Aerial minefields" of 
fixed graphics dots between 
which players must thread their 
way . . . More sadistic program¬ 
mers can make the level of diffi¬ 
culty rise a la Space Invaders as 
the game goes on, until by the 
end the blockaders move faster 
than your ship and only a mira¬ 
cle can get you through. 

But you can think of your own 
frills. The point of Space Block¬ 
ade is that it's reasonable fun 
and can be put together in a few 
hours only, by a process of com¬ 
puter doodling: you produce that 


line of hulking figures, then 
three lines, then three moving 
lines, then add the escaping 
ships and as many as you like of 
the frills above . . . Take it 
slowly. And if you were nervous 
about programming your own 
games, you should be a lot less 
so when you've finished. 

Here's one way of cobbling 
together Space Blockade on a 
TRS-80 (Level II). Almost cer¬ 
tainly it's not the best way. The 
lowest level of difficulty is very 
easy, the highest too hard — 
though there's a deliberate bug 
included to ensure the author 
can always win and amaze his 
friends by sneaky use of the 
space bar. 

Don't just copy or adapt this 
version if you're new to comput¬ 
ing: it's much more interesting to 
tackle the programming your¬ 
self, along the lines suggested. 
The general approach should 
work on any machine with a 
memory-mapped display. 


10 CLEAR359 : DEFIHTR--2 : ' < C > DRV XD LANGFORD 1981 
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COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 23 

















































































T 


> 


i 






.. that’s the only word to really describe the superb Genie 

microcomputer system, the home computer which is 

compatible with the TRS 80, and ideal for all micro- 

enthusiasts, especially the committed hobbyist. 

Genie has now been upgraded to Genie I, incorporating all of the original, 
excellent features, but with the addition of: 

# Extended BASIC, including RENUMBER and SCREEN PRINT. 

#Full upper and lower case, flashing cursor and auto-repeat on all keys. 

• An internal SOUND UNIT to add a new dimension to your own programs. 

* A MACHINE LANGUAGE MONITOR, with Display, modify, enter and execute 

GenieYhas al° ofttiis, plus the built-in cassette deck, 16K RAM, 12k ROM with 
BASIC interpreter, full-size keyboard , an extremely wide range of new and up¬ 
dated peripherals, and literally 1000’s of pre-recorded programmes available. 

Yet, almost unbelievably, the price of Genie I is even lower than that of the original 
Genie. 

Ingenious for business 


The Genie II is a major 
breakthrough for small 
business computers. 
Harnessing all the 
advantages of Genie I, 
including low price, Genie 
II adapts perfectly to 
commercial functions 
with the following 
features: 


I Numeric keyboard 
K Four usable, definable 
function keys. 

# Extension to BASIC 


I Basic business commands 
! Fully expandable with the 
same peripherals 


New!...12" Monitor 

Now, a choice of 2 monitors giving a clear easy to 
read image. The updated EG101 has a new green 
phospher tube. 


New!...Expander 

An updated Expansion Box (EG 3014) is a 
major feature of the new Genie I system, 
and unleashes all its possibilities, allowing 
for up to 4 disk drives with optional 
double density. It connects to a printer, or 
RS232 interface or S100 cards. There is 16k 
RAM fitted and it has a new low price! 


New!...Pruster 

The EG 602 printer can be connected to the 
Genie either through the expander or directly 
into the computer using the Parallel Printer 
Interface. It is a compact unit, with an 80 
column, 5x7 matrix print-out, operating 
quietly and efficiently at 30 characters per 
second. 


Disk Drive 

As well as the obvious advantage of mass 
storage, the addition of the disk system to 
the Genie means much faster access to 
other languages and full random access 
file handling. Up to 4 of these 40 track 
drives can be used on a system. 


SPECIAL TECHNICAL GENIE 
HOT - LINE ON 0629 4995 

for all your technical advice and service back-up on any 
aspect of the Genie system direct from the experts! y 

For full details and demonstration of Genie I, Genie II or advice on any aspect 
of the system, either call in to your local dealer, or write directly to the sole 
importers at the address below. 


Chesterfield Road, Matlock, Derbyshire DE4 5LE. 
Tolonhnnp- Dfi2Q 4QQR TftlftX: 377482 Lowlec G. 


I 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 25 




































TIPS 




MISSION 

(ALMOST) 

IMPOSSIBLE 

Scramble was the first arcade 
machine to send you on a mis¬ 
sion and quickly earned a big 
following. 

Armed with a spaceship which 
fires bullets and drops bombs, 
the player is given differing 
stretches of terrain to cross and 
a variety of things to blow up. 

The secret of the game is 
screen position. Where you are 
on the screen dictates how much 
manoeuvreability the craft has 
and how well it can avoid ob¬ 
stacles and hazards. 

The screen background is roll¬ 
ing constantly forwards and your 
speed is regulated by a joystick- 
type lever which moves you up 
and down and backwards and 
forwards. Pushing the lever back 
enables your craft to “hover" 
against the background, until you 
come to the back of the screen. 

The first screen gives a moun¬ 
tainous background with ground- 
to-air missiles, installations and 
fuel dumps. Fuel is the crucial 
consideration in Scramble, as 
without it, you will plummet from 
the sky. Extra fuel is obtained by 


blowing up fuel dumps and on 
this first easy scenario the player 
should take his time and bomb as 
many dumps as possible. 

Memorising screen positions 
is a vital part of achieving a good 
score as in the same situations, 
missiles fire at the same time. 

The installations in the fourth 
wall can only be bombed (not 
shot) and the screen closes up to 
leave a very narrow, vulnerable 
space at the top of the screen. 


But it is the fifth wall, the 
maze, which causes the most 
problems, as it involves long ver¬ 
tical stretches which can only be 
negotiated by careful use of the 
joystick, moving as far forward as 
possible and then drifting back 
with the screen. 

The flag for the first series of 
screens successfully completed 
can be earned by either shooting 
or crashing into the robot figure 
by the skyscraper after the maze. 


THE SUPER 
GALAXIANS 


GALAGA 


The Galaga race has arrived on 
the British arcade scene. In our 
December issue we warned of 
the coming invasion of a new 
improved Galaxian and now we 
can fill in a few more details of 
this new foe. 

Like Galaxian the creatures fly 
in formation above the firing 
spaceship under your command, 
and swoop down to attack, firing 
bullets as they come. 

Unlike their predecessors, the 
creatures first fly into formation 
from the edges of the screen, 
giving the player an extra oppor¬ 
tunity to shoot them. They also 
swoop back up to join their com¬ 
rades after an unsuccessful dive 
— disconcertingly appearing 
under your craft. 

The Galagas themselves, are 
the leaders of the creatures and 
must be hit twice to successfully 
kill them off. When they reach 
the bottom of the screen, they 
generate an energy cone and 
capture your spaceship, carrying 
it to the top of the screen. If you 
have no reserve spare spacecraft 
left, the game is over, if you do, 
then the challenge is to shoot 
the Galaga without hitting your 
own ship and so rescue it. 

If you manage this, the second 
craft teams up with the first to 
fire in tandem, making a much 
more efficient defence force. 

The first and second stage are 
the same but then you enter the 
first challenge stage with the 40 
craft flying, without firing, across 
the screen — hit them all for a 
10,000 bonus —very useful when 
you consider that 20,000 brings a 
new spacecraft. 

The second challenge stage 
really needs a tandem ship to 
achieve this and the third chal¬ 
lenge stage makes the creatures 
faster still. 

In later screens the droid 
ships flash red and split into 
three “scorpion" craft which 
swerve all over the screen. 

Another feature of the game is 
that it is possible to develop a 
technique for almost continuous 
fire by flicking the fire button 
hard and fast. Plenty of scope for 
the good player and a succession 
of new challenges. 


KNOW YOUR 
CREATURES 

How many arcade creatures did 
you get right? We put a Taito 
space invaders table up for 
grabs for the person who could 
correctly name the machines 
which these nine arcade 
inhabitants come from. 

(A) Pheonix 

(B) Galaxian 

(C) Moon Cresta 

(D) Defender 

(E) Galaxian 

(F) Space Invader 

(G) Space Fury 

(H) Wizard of Wor 

(I) Mazeman, Puckman or Pac- 
man 

The name of the winner will 
be announced in our March 
issue. 



* 


B 



a** 



26 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 




















































ACTION 

CONFESSIONS OF AN 
ARCADE RODENT 


MOUSETRAP 



VIDEO POOL 


Take your cue from the U.S. 


Puckman with a Tom and Jerry 
theme is the essence of Mouse¬ 
trap. 

In this maze-chase game, the 
player takes on the role of the 
mouse, and the villains are the 
cats. 

The mouse has to run around 
the maze eating pieces of cheese 
with the cats chasing after him. 
There are doors which our 
rodent hero can close behind him 
to fend off the enemy. 

The other recourse of the cor¬ 



nered mouse is to eat a bone. 
Bones are dotted around the 
screen like the flashing energy 
dots in Puckman and have a simi¬ 
lar effect — they turn the player 
into a dog for a short time and 
during that period he can turn 
the tables on the cats, which do 
their best to escape. 

Up until here it all seems very 
reminiscent of the Puckman 
game but there are a few extra 
features which add to the prob¬ 
lems of being an arcade mouse. 

Birds fly around the screen 
and will eat the mouse if they 
come across him. The mouse can 
escape the birds by hiding in the 
corners of the screen. 

It is an all-action affair which 
builds logically on the success of 
Puckman but requires the player 
to think further ahead. 

After finding that frogs make 
very acceptable screen heroes, 
the arcade industry is following 
this theory to its logical conclu¬ 
sion. 

The cartoon heroes seem ideal 
participants of this new arcade 
game which features, cheese, 
mice, cats and dogs — in short all 
the ingredients of a successful 
cartoon adventure. 


Do-it-yourself addicts now have 
an arcade game based on their 
activities. 

Following the craze for more 
down-to-Earth themes on the 
arcade scene, comes Crash Rol¬ 
ler, which could as well be 
named, "Crazy decorator". 

The game is similar to the 
Puckman/Mazeman type chase 
game with ghost-like creatures 
chasing our intrepid D.I.Y. 
enthusiast through a series of 
interlocking roadways. 

But while in the Mazeman 
game, the idea is to eat the 
spots, here the player must paint 
over the roadways. 

It is more difficult than its 
predecessor although there are 
only two ghosts in this version. 
They are faster than their Puck- 


The American pool table ousted 
the native bar billiards from 
numerous public bars, many 
years ago. 

But with the necessity of find¬ 
ing cue space all around the 
bulky tables, many pubs found 
that they could not afford the 
space to incorporate a pool table. 

But the video games industry 
came up with an electronic solu¬ 
tion by fitting pool into arcade 
games cabinet. 

Video Pool is already proving a 
popular addition to the arcade 
scene. Instead of using a cue, 
players have to perfect the skill 
of lining up a cross on the cue 
ball. 


man counterparts and slightly 
quicker than the painter. 

To combat this, the painter can 
run to one of two bridges which 
are incorporated on the roadway. 
There he can grab a huge paint 
roller and turn the tables on his 
pursuers in an effort to paint 
over them. Bonus scores are col¬ 
lected for each ghost who is 
caught beneath the paint roller. 

The game is further compli¬ 
cated by the random appear¬ 
ances of creatures who will mess 
up the decorator's handiwork. A 
cat, bird or motor car will appear 
— in much the same way as fruit 
does on Puckman — but these do 
not just offer bonuses. 

The cat, for example leaves 


This technique has already 
been used in computer versions 
of snooker. 

It needs a good eye to line up 
the cross so the cue ball is hit at 
the required angle. 

For those who have not tried 
their hands at the game Ameri¬ 
cans swear is better than 
snooker, the aim is to pocket 
your own balls while leaving your 
opponents' on the table. 

The 15 balls are divided into 
two groups of seven, spots and 
stripes, and the black "8" ball 
which must be left to last. 

The winner is the first player 
to pocket his own seven balls 
and then down the black. 


footprints in the paintwork and 
must be painted flat and his foot¬ 
prints painted over. It is very 
easy to find yourself cursing 
these interruptions as a real 
decorator would any feline crimi¬ 
nal. 

Bonuses are offered for clear¬ 
ing screens in a good time and a 
new screen appears to be filled 
in another bright colour. The first 
screen for instance, in a lurid 
green. An optional feature is pro¬ 
vided in black holes that appear 
randomly in the roadway and the 
decorator can disappear down 
these. 

The bridges are an interesting 
feature, in that you can run over 
and under them. 


GLOSS OVER THESE GHOSTS 


CRASH ROLLER 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 27 
































































r - 



rims ON 


Two World War I air aces are 
locked in an aerial duel in the 
skies above France. 

Discover the skills needed to 
loop-the-loop and come back on 
your opponent's tail. This is one 
of those two player shoot-'em- 
down games in which the screen 
is the sky and the paddles your 
controls. 

Each of two players has an 
aeroplane, presented on the 
Hi-Res Apple screen which can 
be directed with the paddle 
knob. The button allows you to 





5 REH D06FI6HT - HARK PELCZARSK 
1, 1980 

10 GOSUB 6000 

20 POKE 232,Oi POKE 233,3 

22 BA = OjPC(I) * 3 

23 PC<2) * 6 

24 HOHE 

27 S = 2 

28 R2 = 3 

152 INPUT ’YOUR NAHE? "jA« 

154 INPUT "OPPONENT'S NAHE? "jBI 

160 INPUT "SPEED (1-10) ?"|K 
170 R * 8iSH = 0 
180 SCALE* S 
190 HSR 

195 HCOLOR* BAi HPL0T 0,0» CALL 
62454 

200 HOHE l VTAB 21i PRINT A*," 
"|B* 

300 XII) = 20*Y(l) * 120 
310 X<2> * 160*Y(2) * 120 
320 DID * 16iD(2) * 16 
400 FOR I * 1 TO 2i R0T= D<I) I 
4i HC0L0R* PC(I) 

405 H(I) = OiHU) = 16 
410 DRAN 1 AT XU),YU)i NEXT I 
420 VTAB 23* PRINT "PRESS ANY KE 
Y TO START"i SET C« 

500 FOR I * 1 TO 2 
505 3 * 3 - I 
510 6DSUB 1000 
520 NEXT I 


530 

540 

1000 

1010 

1020 

1030 


1040 


IF SN * 1 OR HU) * 5 OR H<2 
) * 5 THEN 4000 
60T0 500 

HC0L0R* BAi ROT* DU) (4 
DRAN 1 AT XU),YU) 

C * PDL II - 1) 

IF C < 20 THEN DU) * DU) - 
li 60T0 1060 

IF C > 235 THEN DU) * DU) 

♦ 1 


1105 A = 2)8 = li 60T0 1120 

1106 A * liB = 1: SOTO 1120 

1107 A * liB * 2i 60T0 1120 

1108 A * OsB = 2i SOTO 1120 


1109 A = 

1110 A * 

1111 A * 

1112 A * 

1113 A = 


- liB * 2i 60T0 1120 

- liB * Is SOTO 1120 

- 2iB » It SOTO 1120 

- 2jB * Oi SOTO 1120 

- 2iB * - ii B0T0 1120 



1114 A = - liB * - li SOTO 1120 

1115 A = - liB = - 2i SOTO 1120 


1060 IF DU) * 0 THEN DU) * 16i 
SOTO 1080 

1070 IF DU) * 17 THEN DU) * 1 
1080 ON DU) SOTO 1101,1102,1103 
,1104,1105,1106,1107,1108,11 
09,1110,1111,1112,1113,1114, 
1115,1116 

1101 A * liB = - 2i GOTO 1120 

1102 A = IsB = - It 60T0 1120 

1103 A * 2»B * - li SOTO 1120 

1104 A * 2iB * 0 j 60T0 1120 


1116 A = 0»B * - 2 
1120 XU) * X(I) + K * A 
1130 IF XU) > 278 THEN XU) = X 
(I) - 278 

1140 IF XU) < 1 THEN XU) * XU 
) ♦ 278 

1150 Y(I> = YII) + K t B 
1200 DRAN 1 AT XU),YU) 

1250 IF ABS (XU) - XIJ)) < R2 AND 
ABS IY(I) - Y(J>) < R2 THEN 
2500 


28 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 














5020 

5030 

3040 

3050 

3060 

3062 

3065 

3070 

4000 

4010 

4020 

4100 

4110 

4120 

4125 

4130 

6000 

6010 

6020 

6025 

6030 


NEXT L 
HC0L0R 5 BA 
FOR L * 1 TO 5 
SCALE 5 Li DRAW 2 AT X(J),Y( 
J) 

NEXT L 
NEXT N 
SCALE 5 S 
RETURN 
IF SN 


1 THEN PRINT 'NO N 
INNER..."M BOTO 4100 
IF H(l) 5 5 THEN PRINT M\ 

* IS A NINNERi'ji BOTO 4100 
PRINT B«»" IS A WINNER!"j 
INPUT * TRY A6AIN?’jC 

* 

IF LEFT! <C»,1> 5 *Y* THEN 
160 

IF LEFT! (C«,l> < > "N“ THEN 
4100 
TEXT 
STOP 

FOR L 5 768 TO 819 
READ Ni POKE L,N 
NEXT 
RETURN 

DATA 3,0,8,0,21,0,48,0,36, 
18,55,55,9,9,60,60,54,62,9,7 
,0 

6040 DATA 18,62,60,39,45,36,55, 
63,44,44,37,39,45,46,46,44,5 
4,39,55,46,46,52,62,62,36,55 
.fl.AJ.33.36.0 


fire at your opponent but you 
only have 16 missiles so take 
care not to waste any. 

You must hit your opponent 
five times to win the game. To 
prevent you crashing into the 
side of the screen and to help 
conjour sneaky ambushes, when 
you go off one side, you reappear 
on the other in a wrap-around 
effect. 

The game can be played at 1U 
different speeds but five and six 
are recommended as the best for 
beginners. 

Be careful not to collide with 
one another as the computer will;, 
register that as a crash. 


1345 HC0L0R 5 BAi DRAN 3 AT XH,YH 
1350 NEXT L 

1400 IF HU) *0 AND H12) 5 0 THEN 
PRINT "YOU’RE BOTH OUT OF H 
ISSLES.-lSN 5 1 


1160 IF YU) > 158 THEN YU) 5 Y 
(I) - 158 

1170 IF YU) < 1 THEN YU) 5 YU 
) * 158 

1190 HC0L0R 5 PCU)l ROT 5 DU) * 

4 

ITS *iH(2)j* HISSLES ' 

1310 XH 5 XU) + AlYN 5 YU) + B 
1315 FOR L 5 1 TO 40 
1320 XH 5 XH + AlYH 5 YH + B 
1325 IF XH > 278 OR XH < 1 OR YH 
> 158 OR YH < 1 THEN 1400 
1330 HC0L0R 5 5i DRAN 3 AT XH,YH 
1340 IF ABS (XH - X(J)) < R AND 
ABS (YH - Y(J)) < R THEN 20 
00 


1410 RETURN 
2000 HU) 5 H(I) ♦ 1 
2010 60SUB 3000 

2100 VTAB 23* PRINT H(l)|" HITS 
•jHUlj* HISSLES "jH(2)j" H 
ITS *jH(2)|* HISSLES * 

2200 IF HU) < 5 THEN 1400 
2210 RETURN 
2500 60SUB 3000 

2510 PRINT -YOU DUHHIES CRASHED 
INTO EACH OTHER!!!* 

2515 SN 5 1 
2520 RETURN 
3000 FOR N 5 1 TO 2 
3005 FOR L 5 1 TO 5 
3010 HC0L0R 5 Li SCALE 5 Li DRAN 2 
AT X(J),Y(J) 


1300 IF PEEK (I - 16288) < 128 THEN 
RETURN 

1305 IF HU) 5 0 THEN RETURN 

1308 HU) 5 HU) - 1 

1309 VTAB 23i PRINT HU)}' HITS 
-,H(1)|‘ HISSLES *|H(2)|" H 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 29 














RUNS ON A NASCOM 


The ancient game of Nim is 
brought in given a 20th Century 
feel by the addition of robots in 
place of matches. 

The robots are shot by the 
players and removed from the 
screen as the matchsticks are, in 
the game of Nim. 

Based on the Android Nim 
game which is popular on the 
Tandy machine in America, 
Nimbot should find a receptive 
audience in the U.K. 

Nimbot sets out the robots in 
the usual seven, five, three, for¬ 
mation, and challenges you to 
shoot 1-3 from any column. If 
more than one is taken, then 
those removed must be adjacent, 
either vertically or horizontally. 

The object of the game is to 
shoot the last robot, but the 


BY TERRY BROWN 


KARL PARKER 



strategy involved, in this game 
for people who can think ahead, 
makes sure it is not as simple as 
it appears. 

Nim has already proved an 
ideal candidate for computerisa¬ 
tion, Nimbot makes it visually 
exciting as well. 

The program will let you 
choose to go first or second and 
plays a tight game of Nim. 

Remember to give plenty of 
thought to your opening moves, 
because these can be just as cru¬ 
cial as those played when the 
last few robots are nervously 
waiting to see which of their 
number will be shot next. 

But don't feel too guilty if you 
shoot the last one, the Nascom 
will soon build up another three 
columns for you to tackle. 


1 O 
20 
30 
40 
30 
60 
70 
SO 
: OH 
100 
1 10 
120 
1 30 
140 
1 50 
160 


NIMBOT 


ROBOTIC NIM No* DEMO 


CONNECT SPEAKER- TO BIT 0 PORT 4 
TO GET AN AUDIBLE OUTPUT FROM GAME 


REM 

REM 
REM 

REM 
REM 
' ‘EM 
REM 
REM 
RE M 

CLS*WIDTH 255* DDKE 4100>3200*CLEAR 1000 
DEI ENX (N )--NOT ( (A AND N) OR NOT (A OR N) ) 
SOUND*3200$KEY-3264 * USER-4i00 s VDU*2058 
OUT 6* 15$ OUT 4,0 

FOR A*3200 TO 3249*READ B*P0KE A#B*NEXT 
DATA 62*15* 2 11*6*33* 0 * 13* 6 
DATA 8,197*126*183*40*25*94*35 


ktt X- 
** * 
§§ii 
x x * 
"mm, 
i 11 
# mm 




30 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 


























■ 

1 


170 
ISO 
3 90 
200 
23 0 
220 
930 
240 
250 
260 
270 
280 
290 
300 
310 
320 
330 
340 
350 
360 
370 
380 
ATN‘ 
390 
400 
410 
420 
430 
440 
450 
460 
470 
480 
490 
500 
510 
520 
530 
540 
550 
560 
570 
580 
590 
600 


DATA 86*43*67*62*2*255*16* 251 
DATA 2.19*4* 47*211*4*21*32*242 
DATA 3 93* 16* 230»35 * 35 * 24* 224* 193 
DATA 201*193*16* 230*35*35*24*224 
DATA 193*201 

FOR A=3264 TO 32741READ Bt POKE A*B*NEXT 
DATA 223* 97* 56*1 * 175*71*175* 42*13*224*233 
D$ - " J J JJ J ” ; S$ ~ '* 

DATA " hhATN " 

DATA " >>TAN " 

DATA '• MI B* J JMI D$PO I NT “ 

DATA “TANJPOINTTAN" 

DATA "rj-o* v " 

DATA " hhATN *' 

DATA " }>TAN ” 

DATA " J jATN " 

DATA " t f TAN '' 

DATA “ hMjPOINT " 

DATA “ GSIN " 

DATA " IpIpATN " 

DATA *’ f TAN “ 

DATA " 


DATA 
DATA 
DATA 
FOR A 


' ppTAN 
1 hhATN” 
‘ }}TAN" 
■0 TO 4 


4tREAD A$<A> ? NEXT 

5? FOR B=0 TO 1{READ H$(A*B) 


FOR A-0 TO 
FOR A-0 TO 
NEXT B»A 
FOR A=0 TO 3 

READ A1(A> 0)>Ai<A*1)*A2<A*0>»A2(A*1) 

NEXT 

DATA 8* 7 > 9* 6* 8* 8*10*6*8*9*11*6*8*10*12*6 

DOKE USER*KEY 
CLSiSCREEN 7*7 

PR I NT " Do you wan t i ns t rue t i ons ? (Y or N) " 
A = USR < 0 > fIF A~0 THEN 530 
IF A=ASC("Y") THEN G03UB 1870?G0T0 560 
IF A< >ASC("N") THEN 530 
N < 1 )~ 7 {N(2)=5{N(3)=3 

CLSf A$-" NIMBOT Copyright (C) South East 

A$=A$+"London Software"?A=0 

A=A+1; POKE 3017+A* ASC<MID*< A$* A* 1) ) 

IF A<48 THEN 590 




COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 31 















m, m “»•! 


THE SHARP MZ-80K 
HAS GOT IT ALL 




STOP PRESS... NOW AVAILABLE 
BASIC COM PILER 
PASCAL (CASSETTE BASED) 
DOUBLE PRECISION DISC BASIC 

FDOS INCLUDES EDITOR AND 
Z-80 ASSEMBLER 


•SSSSSffipSS 

^PSHAR PS ^|HARP 


i *HARp|uJSp| H/ 'RPSH»K 

&»Ih«p&shaS 
fcSi^»»&?HAR 


Since its introduction 
the Sharp MZ-80K has 
proved to be one of the 
most successful 
and versatile 
microcomputer 
systems around. 

Sharp now have 
a comprehensive 
range of products 
ready to make the 
powerful MZ-80K with its 
Printer and Disc Drives even more adaptable. 

Products include: - Universal Interface Card, Machine 
Language and Z-80 Assembler packages, CP/M* plus a 
comprehensive range of software. 

You'll find all the help and advice you need about the 
MZ-80K at your Specialist Sharp Dealer in the list below. 

* Trade mark of Digital Research Ltd 


If there is no dealer in your area, or if you require 
any further information write to: - Computer Division, 
Sharp Electronics (UK) Ltd , Sharp House, Thorp Road, 
Newton Heath, Manchester Ml 09BE. 


AVON 

BCG Computer Systems Ltd., 
Bristol.Tel: 0272 425338 
Decimal Business M/Cs Ltd., 
Bristol.Tel: 0272 294591 
Target Electronics, 

Bristol.Tel: 0272 421196 
BERKSHIRE 
Computer 100, 

Bray Tel: 0628 35619 
Newbear Computing Store Ltd., 
Newbury. Tel: 0635 30505 
BIRMINGHAM 
Camden Electronics, 

Small Heath.Tel: 021 773 8240 
Electronic Business Systems Ltd., 
Birmingham.Tel: 021 3842513 
Jax Rest Ltd., 

Birmingham.Tel: 021 3504555 

Newbear Computing Store Ltd., 
Birmingham B26. 

Tel: 021 707 7170 
BUCKINGHAMSHIRE 
Curry's Microsystems, 

High Wycombe.Tel: 0494 40262 
Interface Components Ltd., 
Amersham.Tel: 02403 22307 
CAMBRIDGE 

The Avery Computing Co Ltd., 

Bar Hill.Tel: 0954 80991 

CHESHIRE 

Bellard Electronics Ltd., 

Chester. Tel: 0244 380123 
Charlesworth of Crewe Ltd., 
Crewe. Tel: 0270 56342 
Chandos Products, 

NewMills.Tel: New Mills 44344 
CR Technical Services, 

Chester. Tel: 0244 317549 
Fletcher Worthington Ltd., 

Hale Tel: 061 928 8928 


Holdene Limited, 

Wilrnslow.Tel: 0625 529586 
Newbear Computing Store Ltd., 
Stockport.Tel: 061 491 2290 
Ors Group Ltd., 

Warrington.Tel: 0925 67411 
Sumlock Software, 

Warrington.Tel: 0925 574593 
CLEVELAND 

Hunting Computer Services Ltd., 
Stockton-on-Tees. Tel: 0642 769709 
Intex Datalog Ltd., 

Stockton-on-Tees. Tel: 0642 781193 

DERBYSHIRE 

Malison Electronics Ltd., 

Derby. Tel: 0332 38066 
DEVON 

Plymouth Computers, 

Plymouth. Tel: 0752 23042 

DURHAM 

Neecos (DP) Ltd., 

Darlington. Tel: 0325 69540 

ESSEX 

Prorole Ltd., 

Westdiff-on-Sea. Tel: 0702 335298 

Wilding Office Equipment, 

Ilford Tel: 01 5141525 
GLOUCESTERSHIRE 
Gloucestershire Shop 
Equipment Ltd., 

Gloucester. Tel: 0452 36012 
The Computer Shack, 

Cheltenham.Tel: 0242 584343 
HAMPSHIRE 

Advanced Business Concepts, 
New Milton.Tel: 0425 618181 
Xitan Systems Ltd., 
Southampton.Tel: 0703 38740 
HEREFORD 
Market Logic Ltd., 

Little Dewcnurch.Tel: 0432 70279 




HUMBERSIDE 
Commercial Systems Ltd., 

Hull.Tel: 0482 20022 
Silicon Chip Centre, 

Grimsby. Tel: 0472 45353 

KENT 

Technolink Europa Ltd., 

Tunbridge Wells.Tel: 0892 32116 
Video Services (Bromley) Ltd., 
Bromley. Tel: 01 460 8833 
LANCASHIRE 
Nelson Computer Services, 
Rawtenstall.Tel: 0706229125 
Sumita Electronics Ltd., 

Preston. Tel: 0772 51686 
LEICESTERSHIRE 
Gilbert Computers, 

Lubenham.Tel: 085865894 
G.W. Cowling Ltd., 

Leicester. Tel: 0533 553232 
Leicester Computing Centre, 
Leicester. Tel: 0533 556268 
Mays Hi-Fi, 

Leicester. Tel: 0533 22212 

LINCOLNSHIRE 

Howes Elect & Autom. Servs., 

Lincoln.Tel: 0522 32379 

Z.R. Business Consultants, 

Lincoln.Tel: 0522 31621 

LONDON 

Bridgewater Accounting, 

Whetstone. Tel: 014460320 
Butel-Comco Ltd., 

Hendon.Tel: 01 2020262 
Central Calculators Ltd., 

London EC2 Tel: 01 7295588 
Deans, 

London W8.Tel: 01 937 78% 
Digital Design and Development, 
London Wl.Tel: 01 387 7388 
Euro-Calc Ltd., 

London EC2 Tel: 01 7294555 


Henry's Radio Ltd., 

London W2.Tel: 01402 6822 
Lion Computing Shops Ltd., 
London Wl.Tel: 01 6371601 
Scope Ltd., 

London EC2.Tel: 01 7293035 

Sumlock Bondain Ltd., 

London ECl.Tel: 01 253 2447 

MANCHESTER 
The Byte Shop, 

Manchester Ml.Tel: 061 236 4737 

Electrovalue, 

Manchester. Tel: 061 432 4945 

Sumlock Electronic Services Ltd., 
Manchester M3.Tel: 061 8344233 
MERSEYSIDE 
Microdigital Ltd., 

Liverpool Tel: 051 227 2535 
NORFOLK 

Sumlock Bondain (East Anglia) 
Norwich.Tel: 0603 26259 
NORTHAMPTONSHIRE 
Computer Supermarket, 

Corby. Tel: 0536662571 
HB Computers, 

Kettering. Tel: 0536 520910 
NORTHERN IRELAND 
Bromac(UK), 

Co. Antrim.Tel: 023831 3394 

O & M Systems, 

Belfast. Tel: 0232 49440 
NOTTINGHAMSHIRE 
Almarc Business Systems Ltd., 
Nottingham.Tel: 0602 62251 
Mansfield Business M/C Ltd., 
Mansfield. Tel: 0623 26610 
OXFORDSHIRE 
Oxford Computer Centre, 
Oxford.Tel: 086545172 
REPUBLIC OF IRELAND 
O'Connor Computers Ltd., 
Galway. Tel: 0009 61173 


Sharptext, 

Dublin 2. Tel: 0001 764511 

Tomorrows World Ltd., 

Dublin 2.Tel: 0001 776861 
SCOTLAND 
A & G Knight, 

Aberdeen.Tel: 0224630526 

Business and Electronics M/Cs, 

Edinburgh.Tel: 031 2265454. 

Micro Centre, 

Edinburgh.Tel: 031 5567354 
Micro Cnange, 

Glasgow. Tel: 041 5541462 

Microforth, 

Dunfermline.Tel: 0383 32071 

Moray Instruments Ltd., 

Elgin.Tel: 0343 3747 
Pointer Business Equipment Ltd., 
Glasgow. Tel: 041 332 3621 
SOMERSET 

Norset Office Supplies Ltd., 

Cheddar Tel: 0934 742184 

SUFFOLK 

C.J.R. Microtek Co. Ltd., 

Ipswich.Tel: 0473 50152 

SURREY 

3D Computers, 

Surbiton.Tel: 01 3374317 
Croydon Micro, 

Carshalton.Tel: 01 643 4290 
Dataiect, 

Croydon.Tel: 01 6803581 

Dataiect, 

Woking.Tel: 04862 25995 

Micronnes Ltd., 

Kingston.Tel: 01 5469944 
R.M.B. Ltd., 

Croydon.Tel: 01 6841134 

Saradan Electronic Services, 

Wallington.Tel: 016699483 


SUSSEX 

Crown Business Centre, 

Eastbourne. Tel: 0323 639983 

Gamer, 

Brighton.Tel: 0273 698424 
M & H Office Equipment 
Brighton.Tel: 0273 697231 

WALES 

Limrose Electronics Ltd., 
Wrexham.Tel: 097 883 5555 
Morriston Computer Centre, 
Swansea. Tel: 0792 795817 
Sigma Systems Ltd., 

Cardiff. Tel: 0222 21515 
Welsh Computer Centre, 
Bridgend.Tel: 0656 58481 
WARWICKSHIRE 
Business & Leisure 
Microcomputers, 

Kenilworth.Tel: 0926512127 

WILTSHIRE 

Everyman Computers, 

Westbury. Tel: 0373 823764 

YORKSHIRE 

Bits & P.C.'s 

Wetherby. Tel: 0937 63744 
Datron Micro-Centre Ltd., 
Sheffield. Tel: 0742 585490 
Huddersfield Computer Centre, 
Huddersfield.Tel: 0484 20774 
Leeds Computer Centre, 

Leeds.Tel: 0532 458877 
Omega Systems Ltd., 

Leeds.Tel: 0532 704499 
Ram Computer Services Ltd., 
Bradford.Tel: 0274 391166 
Superior Systems Ltd., 

Sheffield. Tel: 0742 755005 

Also at selected Lasky’s 
and Wildings 

Office Equipment Branches. 


32 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 






















610 FOR A-l TO 15 STEP 5}FOR B=0 TO 4 

620 SCREEN i#A+B;PRINT A$<B);;NEXT B 

630 RESET(5#(A-1)*3+7);NEXT A 

640 DOKE USER#KEY;SCREEN 10#7 

650 PRINT "Do you want first shot ?<Y or N>" 

660 A=USF<<0) i IF' A = 0 THEN 660 

670 IF A=ASC<”N") THEN GOSUB 1820;GOTO 870 

680 IF AOASCC’Y") THEN 660 

690 GOSUB 1820 

700 POKE 8013# 42;DOKE USER# KEY 

710 A=USR(0);IF A=0 THEN GOSUB 1000;GOTO 710 

720 R«A-49;IF R<0 OR R>2 THEN 710 

730 POKE VDU+5+R*320+64# A 

740 A=USR(0);IF A=0 THEN GOSUB 1000;GOTO 740 
750 IF A=8 THEN POKE VDU+5+R*320+64#32;GOTO 710 
760 N=A ~48;IF N<1 OR N>7 THEN 740 
770 POKE VDU+5+R*320+192# A 

780 A~USR(0>;IF A=0 THEN GOSUB 1000;GOTO 780 

790 IF A=8 THEN POKE VDU+R*320+197#32;GOTO 740 

800 IF A< >13 THEN 780 

810 GOSUB 1300;REN *** LOOK AT LINE 

820 POK i VDU+R*320469♦32;POKE VDU+R*320+197 # 32 

830 IF F-0 THEN 710 

840 GOSUB 1440;REM *** TAKE SHOTS 

850 IF N <1)+N < 2)+N < 3 > = 0 THEN 1210 

860 POKE 3018,32 

870 A = N<1);A=FNX(N(2));A=FNX(N(3)) 

880 IF A>0 THEN 900 

890 FOR G=1 TO 200;GOSUB 1000;NEXT;GOTO 1130 
900 S-0:FOR B=1 TO 3;FOR D=1 TO N(EO 
910 X=N(1);Y=N(2);Z=N < 3) 

920 IF B=1 THEN X=X-D 

930 IF B=2 THEN Y=Y-D 

940 IF B=3 THEN Z=Z-D 

950 A=X;A=FNX(Y);A=FNX(Z) 

960 IF A=0 THEN S=S+1;S(S# 0)=B;S(S#1)-D 
970 NEXT D# B 

980 S=I NT(RND<1)*S+1);R=S(S#0)-1;N=S < S#1) 

990 FOR C-i TO 200;GOSUB 1000;NEXT;GOTO 1160 

1000 V=V+1 AND 7;IF V THEN RETURN 

1010 Y= I NT (RND (1) *3+1) ; X = I NT < RND < 1) *N < Y) f-1) 

1020 IF N(Y)- 0 THEN 1000 
1030 H -1 NT(RND(1)*5+1) 

1040 FOR A=0 TO 1;SCREEN 52-5*X-5*Y#5*Y+A-4 

1050 PRINT H$(H# A)#;NEXT 

1060 IF H< 5 THEN DOKE USER#KEY;RETURN 

1070 L=I NT(RND(1)*8+1);POKE 3220# 3 

1080 DOKE USER#SOUND; BF= 13*256; FOR D=1 TO L, 

1090 POKE BF#RND(1)*20+20;POKE BF+1#2 



COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 33 




























.1.1.00 POKE PF+2* 0i Z-USR i 0 > 

.1110 FOR A=1 TO RND<1)*20+15$NEXT 

1120 NEXT$H=0sPOKE 3220#2s GOTO 1040 

1130 X=Os FOR A-l TO 3s IF N(A)>X THEN X=A 

1140 IF N (A) = X AND F<ND(1) >, 5 THEN X=A 

1150 NEXTs R=X-1 s N= 1 

1160 GOSUB 1300s GOSOB 1440 

1170 IF Nil)+N(2)+N< 3) THEN 700 

1180 SCREEN 15*7 s PRINT "I'VE BEATEN YOU!!!!" 

1190 FOR A=1 TO 8 s Z=I <SR(O)sNEXT 

1200 GOTO 1250 

1210 SCREEN 15 # 7 s PRINT "YOU'VE BEATEN ME! ! ! !“ 
1220 FOR A=1 TO 256s OUT 4#A AND Is NEXT 
1230 DOKE USER*KEY 

1240 A=USR(0)sIF A-ASC( "Y" ) THEN GOTO 

1250 SCREEN 15 * 9 s PRINT "Ano ther game ?(Y or N) 

1260 DOKE USER*KEY 

1270 A=USR<0)sIF A=ASC <"Y") THEN 560 
1280 IF AOASCCr ) THEN 1270 
1290 GOTO 2070 

130O H=2sGOSUB 1410s FOR A=i TO 300s NEXT 
1310 H=0sGOSUB 1410s FOR A=i TO 300s NEXT 
1320 IF NJR+1HN THEN 1370 
1330 RESTORE 1360 

1340 FOR B=i TO 8s READ HsGOSUB 1410s NEXT 
1350 F=Is RETURN 
1360 DATA 4#0*3*0*4#0*3*0 
1370 RESTORE 1400 

1380 FOR B-.1 TO 8s READ Hs GOSUB 1410s NEXT 

1390 F=Os RETURN 

1400 DATA 1* 0* 2» O* 1 * 0» 2* 0 

1410 FOR A=0 TO Is SCREEN l*R*5+A+i 

1420 PRINT H$(H» A)* s NEXT A 

1430 FOR A=1 TO 75s NEXTsRETURN 

1440 H=2sGOSUB 14i0sF0R A=1 TO iOOOsNEXT 

1450 FOR A»0 TO 3sX1=A1(A*O)sY1=A1(A*1)+R*15 

1460 X2=A2<A*0)sY2=A2(A#1)+R*15 

1470 SET < X2» Y2)s RESET(X1 * Yi) 

1480 NEXTs GP-VDU+7+320*R+-t28s POKE GP» ASC( " = " ) 
1490 FOR A=1 TO IOOOsNEXT 

1500 FOR Y=3 TO 1 STEP -is IF N(Y)>0 THEN 1520 
1510 NEXT Ys GOTO 1580 
1520 FOR X=i TO N(Y) 

1530 FOR A=0 TO Is SCREEN 52-5*X-5*Y*5*Y-5+A+l 

1540 IF Y>R+1 THEN H=3 

1550 IF Y=R+1 THEN H=1 

1560 IF Y<R+i THEN H=4 

1570 PRINT H$(H*A)*sNEXT A»X*Y 

1580 DOKE USER* SOUNDS BF =0 3*256 

1590 POKE BF+2* Os FOR A=32 TO 4 STEP -1 






















DICTATOR 

Another great adventure game from Bug- 
byte for the 16K ZX81. This time, you are the 
President of a small state. The object of the 
game is to avoid revolution, escape from 
assassination attempts, and maintain your 
popularity, while managing the secret police 
and army, and maintaining a secure 
economy. This is a very complex simulation, 
utilising the whole 16K, and the cassette 
comes with an eight page booklet giving full 
instructions and hints on how to survive. 

Can you stand up to the pressures of life as a 
dictator and prevent unrest from spreading? 
Place an order today and find out. 

PRICE £9.00 




CONSTELLATION 

Turn your ZX81 into a telescope! The prog¬ 
ram will produce a simulation of the night sky 
as seen from any chosen position on Earth at 
any chosen time this century. You can point 
your "telescope" in any chosen direction, 
move it up, down, left or right; zoom in or pull 
out and display the stars by magnitude or 
constellation. 

PRICE £8.00 


RENUM 

Complete renumbering program for the 
ZX81. Renumbers line numbers, GOTOs and 
GOSUBs. Very fast. A must for the serious 
programmer. 

PRICE £4.00 


ALL OUR PRICES INCLUDE VAT & 
POSTAGE 

Access and Barclaycard orders accepted on 
051 227 2642 (24 hour service) 



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98-100 THE ALBANY 
OLD HALL STREET 
LIVERPOOL L3 9EP 


CM 

3 

CM 

CM 

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Acorn Atom 

GALAXIANS 


****** 
** *!*!!*!!*! 

'sk ' .sk 

INVADERS 


Fantastic arcade-type game 12K, 
graphics mode 4, fast swooping 
aliens, sound effects, high score etc. 

PRICE £8.00 


CHESS 




"The best excuse to expand your Atom. It is a 
superb version of the standard game, tough and 
fast" Your computer Nov '81 12K, graphics 
mode 4 ONLY £8.00 


MORE ATOM CASSETTES 

FROM OUR 

RANGE 


PINBALL6K, gr.2 

£6.00 

BACKGAMMON 7K 

£7.00 

BREAKOUT4K, gr.1 

£4.00 

STAR TREK 12K,FP 

£5.00 

LUNAR LANDER 12K,gr.4 

£5.50 

LABYRINTH 12K,gr.2A,FP 

7.00 

GOLF7K.FP 

£5.00 

NEW 1-Key BASIC2K 

£5.00 

STOCKMARKET5K.FP 

£5.00 

DODGEMS + SNAKE 6K 

£5.00 

DISASSEMBLER 2K 

£4.00 

TYPIST 7K 

£4.00 

UFO BOMBER 7K 

£4.00 


THE PROGRAM YOU'VE BEEN 
WAITING FOR! 

Fantastic machine code chess game for the 12K 
Atom. Features include: split screen (high 
res. + alphanumerics); many levels of play; 
castling Et en passant; computer plays black or 
white; can set up pieces for chess problems etc. 
Supplied on cassette with instructions. 

PRICE ONLY £9.00 
DON'T FORGET 

OUR PRICES INCLUDE VAT & POSTAGE 


747 


FLIGHT SIMULATION PROGRAM FOR 
THE 12K ATOM 

Written for Bug-byte by a 747 pilot. Accurate simulation of a 747 s 
cockpit display lairspeed, altitude, rate of climb, attitude, flaps, 
etc . and graphic display of horizontal situation & attitudel; allows 
you to guide your craft to the landing strip On making your final 
approach the display changes to a high-resolution 3D 
representation of the runway coming up to meet you. A real test of 
skill. Finding the runway is quite a challenge-landing safely is even 
more difficult. If you succeed, you are awarded a skill rating and the 
chance to take off and try again. 

REQUIRES FLOATING POINT ROM 

PRICE ONLY £8 00 


0) 

LU 

O 

CC 

a. 


Sinclair ZX81 


The Damsel and The Beast (16K) 

£6.50 

Startrek (16K) 

£5.00 

ZXAS assembler (16K) 

£5.00 

ZXDB disassembler/debugger (16K) 

£6.50 

* MULTIFILE filing system (16K) 

£17.50 

VIEWTEXT paged information (16K) 

£7.00 

BREAKOUT (IK) 

£4.50 

PROGRAM PACK 1 (8 IK games) 

£3.50 


PROGRAM PACK 4 (asteroid belt and surround) £4.50 
PROGRAM PACK 6 (mars rescue and 3D oxo) £4.50 

*Note: Multifile may be used with more than 16K 
RAM by simply changing one line of the program. 


VIC 20 SOFTWARE 

NOW AVAILABLE 
Send SAE for latest list 



98 100 THE ALBANY 
OLD HALL STREET 
LIVERPOOL L3 9EP 


d 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 35 




















































1600 
1610 
1620 
1630 
1640 
1650 
1660 
1670 
1680 
1690 
1 700 
1710 
1720 
1730 
1740 
1750 
1760 
1770 
1780 
1790 
1800 
1810 
1820 
1830 
1840 
1850 
1860 
1870 
1880 
1890 
1900 
1910 
1920 
1930 
1940 
1950 
1960 
1970 
1980 
1990 
2000 
2010 
2020 
2030 
2040 
2050 
2060 
2070 
Ok 


There is a test tone on bit 0> 
port 4 “ 


36 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



















/MICROCOMPUTERS 

l 


I AT 


_ Shops 
Nationwide 

Birmingham 

19/21 Corporation btreet, Birmingham, B2 4LP. 

Tel: 021-632 6303. 

Manager: Peter Stallard. 300 yards from Bullring Centre. 

Bristol 

16/20 Penn Street, Bristol, BS1 3AN. Tel: 0272 20421. 
Between Holiday Inn and C & A. 

Chester 

The Forum, Northgate Street, Chester, CHI 2BZ. 

Tel: 0244 317667. 

Manager: Jeremy Ashcroft. Next to the Town Hall. 

Edinburgh 

4 St. James Centre, Edinburgh, EH1 3SR. Tel: 031-556 6217 
Manager. Colin Draper. 

East end of Prices Street, St. James Centre. 

Preston 

1/4 Guildhall Arcade, Preston, PR1 1 HR. 

Tel: 0772 59264. 

Manager: Jim Comisky. Directly under Guild Hall. 

Manchester 

12/14 St. Mary's Gate, Market Street, Manchester, Ml IPX 
Tel: 061-832 6087. 

Manager: Lesly Jacobs. Corner of Deansgate. 

Glasgow 

22/24 West nTI? S treet, Glasgow, G7 2PF. Tel: 041-226 3349 
Manager: David Livingstone. 

Between Buchannan Street and Central Station 

Sheffield 

58 Leopold Street, Sheffield, SI 2GZ. Tel: 0742 750971. 
Manager: Justin Rowles. Top of the Moor, opposite Town Hall. 



Liverpool 


33 Dale Street, Liverpool, L2 2HF. Tel: 051-236 2828. 
Manager: Mark Butler. 

Between the Town Hall and Magistrates Courts. 


London 


42 Tottenham Court Road, London, W1 9RD. 

Tel: 01-636 0845. Manager: Vass Demosthenis. 

Official Orders over £50 are welcome with normal 30 days 
credit extended to bona-fide commercial and government 
organisations. 

A Laskys, the retail division of 
|pr the Ladbroke Group of Companies 

/MICROCOMP UTERS 

iat a\ Mfomvmm/im'/ 

W 


Apple II 

The worlas best selling micro offers unmatched 
flexibility. At our special prices. 

Apple II + 48K 

Nett: 675.00 Vat: 101.25 Total: 776.25 
Disk Drive Plus Controller (3.3) 

Nett: 375.00 Vat: 56.25 Total: 431.25 
Disk Drive 

Nett: 295.00 Vat: 44.25 Total: 339.25 

MZ 80K 

Deservedly popular the MZ 80K comes with 48K 
of RAM, built in screen and cassette. - superb value. 
MZ 80K Computer 48K 

Nett: 347.00 Vat: 52.00 Total: 399.00 

Atari 400 

Ideal for the home wirn excellent games and 
education packages. This computer features colour 
and sound and is built tough to last. 

400 16K Computer 

Nett: 300.00 Vat: 45.00 Total: 345.00 
410 Tape Recorder 

Nett: 43.48 Vat: 6.52 Total: 50.00 


Atari 800 

The big brother of the 400 shares all the star 
features and has much more as well. 

800 16K Computer 

Nett: 560.87 Vat: 84.13 Total: 645.00 
810 Disk Drive 

Nett: 300.00 Vat: 45.00 Total: 345.00 
822 Thermal Printer 

Nett: 230.43 Vat: 34.57 Total. 265.00 

Hewlett Packard 
HP 85 

Scientific and technical professionals favour the 
HP 85, they are being joined by increasing numbers 
of business professionals. 

HP 85 Computer 

Nett: 2146.95 Vat: 322.04 Total: 2468.99 
16K Memory Module 

Nett: 194.88 Vat: 29.23 Total: 224.1 1 
ROM Drawer 

Nett: 29.73 Vat: 4.46 Total: 34.19 


zaHil 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 37 








































r 





If you have grown tired of forever 
running and dodging from the 
many tribes of aliens who make 
an honest crust by guesting in 
computer games, Alien Hunt will 
appeal to you. 

In the game you are the 
dominant life-form and the poor 
alien is on the run. 

It makes a nice change for the 
humans to be able to win so 
make the most of it. 

The aim of this Acorn Atom 
game is to trap the alien in the 
top left hand corner of the screen 
by cutting his escape routes off 
by drawing lines around him. 

If you miss your objective and 
mistakenly trap him elsewhere, 
penalty points are accrued. The 
aim is to get as low a score as 
possible. 

Your efforts are scored, com¬ 
mented upon and a new game is 
automatically restarted. 

The alien emits a squeal 
through the Atom speaker when 
trapped or crushed. 

Due to the printer used not 
having a hash (#) symbol, a "£" 
sign has been substituted. This 
should be turned into a hash 
sign wherever it crops up. 

No graphic modes are used 
and the game is written, mainly 
in machine code, so it only takes 
up 4.3K on the computer. 

Line 17 will be of interest to 
Atom users as it is a routine 
which waits for the frame sync 
pulse to go low, before POKE-ing 
to the screen, thus avoiding the 
usual Atom screen noise. 


38 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 

























































































iGOS.c 

10DIM FF0,KK9,MM0,PP0,2Z15,SS5 
11P. $ 12 i M=24 i riM0=-1 > PP0=-1 i KK8=-1 > T=£B002 
12F.N=1T0 2-iDIM P-l;P.$2l 
16 C 

17 ■ FF0 LDRG128 J BIT£6002; BNE FF0iLDR£82jRTS 

2R: KK0 LDRS3; STfl£B000.i LDfl£B001; CMPfi£FEiBNE KK1 

22LDRERR;CMP813>BEQ 222;LDfl£87;STfl£81 i LDR£36 s STR£80 

24LDY80 > LPX8£20;STX£85;JSR MM@ >LD YG0 > LDfl<£80 > , Y;CMPG24>BEQ 221 

26LDR£81 ; STR£87 i LDR£80 > STfl£86;LDRG127 > STfl£82;JSR FF0 

27STfl<£86),Y 

28LDX£flfl ; INX;STX£fifiiRTS 

30 > 222 JMP KK8 

70 >KK1 LDRG3 i STfl£B000;LDfl£B001 > CMPG£7E•BNE KK2 
72LDfl£RR >CMPG13 i BEQ 222 

74LDR£87; STR£81; IDR£86iSTR£80i LDX8£20iSTX£35 ; JSR MM0 
76LPY80 i LDR< £80 ')> YCMP824; BEQ Z24;LDR£81; STfl£87 LDR£88; 3TR£86 
78LDRG64j STfl£82i JSR FF0.:STR< £86 >, Y;LOXfflfl; INXiSTXEflfliRTS 
80^224 JMP K.K8 

120 = KK2 L0R82j STfl£B000 > LDR£B001;CMPGfFE >BNE KK3 
122LDR£RR i CMPG0;BEQ 226 > LDfl£87 > STR£81 > LDfl£86 i STfi£80;LDX8£20 
124LDY80 } STX£85 :• JSR PP0; LDfi< £80 >, Y ; CMPG24; BEQ 226 
126LDR£81 i STR£87LDR£83j STR£86.; LDR8127; STfi£82; JSR FF0 
127STfi<£86),Y ; LDXfflfljDEX i STX£flfl>RTS 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 39 













































1 ot 1: Jnr l\Ko 

i70=KK3 LDR82;STREB990;LDR£B001;CMPg£7E >BNE KK4 
172LDfi£flfi;CMPQ0;BEQ ZZ6;LDRE87;STR£31;LDfl£86;STR£80;LDX8E20 
174STX£35; JSR PP9;LDR<£80),Y;CMP824;BEQ ZZ8 
176LDR£81;STR£37;LDRE80;STRESS;LDR864;STR£82;JSR FF0 
177LDYQ0;STfi<£86 >,Y;LDXERfl;DEX;STXERR;RTS 
178 : ZZ8 JMP KK8 

220 : KK4 LDfl86;STfl£B000;LDR£B001;CMPe£FE;BHE KK5 
222LPRE90;CMP81;BEQ ZZ10;LDRE87;STfl£81;LDR£86;STR£30;LDX81 
224STXE85; JSR MM9; LDYS0; LDfiC £80Y; CMP824; BEQ ZZ10 
226LDR£81;STR£87;LDR£89;STRESS;LDR8127;STfl£82;JSR FF0 
228LDY69; STR 1 ! £86), Y; LDX£99; DEX; STXE99; RTS 
230 : ZZ10 JMP KK8 

270 : KK5 LDR86;STR£B090;LDR£B001;CMP8E7E;BNE KK6 
272LDR£99;CMP®1;BEQ ZZ12;LDR£87;STfl£81;LDR£86;STfl£80; LDX81 
274STXE85; JSR MM0; LDY09; LDR< £80 >.. Y; CMP824; BEQ ZZ 12; LDR£81 
275STR£37 

27SLDR£80;STRESS;LDR864;STR£82;JSR FF0;STflC£86)>Y;LDX£90 
278DEX;STX£99;RTS 
300 : ZZ12 JMP KK8 

320 : KK6 LDRSSSTfl£B000; LDREB001; CMP0EFD; BNE KK7 
321LDY80 

322LDR£99;CMP830;BEQ ZZ13;LDRE87;STR£81;LDR£86;STR£89;LDX®1 
324STXE85;JSR PP0;LDR(£80),Y;CMP824;BEQ ZZ13;LDR£81; STR£87 
339LDRE80;STRESS;LDR8127;STRE82;JSR FF9;STR< £86),Y 
335LDXE90;INX;STXE90;RTS 
349 : ZZ13 JMP KK8 

379 • KK7 LDRSS; STR£B999; LDREB091; CMPSE7D; BNE KK.8 
372LDRE90;CMPS39;BEQ KK8;LDRE87;STfl£81;LDRE36;STR£89 
373LDYS0;LPX81 

374STX£85;JSR PP0;LDfl<£80 >,Y;CMPS24;BEQ KK8;LDR£81;STRE87 
376LDRE89;STRESS;LDR864;STfl£82; JSR FFQ;STR(£86Y 
378LDXE99;INX;STX£90;RTS 
420 : KK8 RTS 

1300•MM9 SEC;LDR£89;SBC£85;STRE80;LDRE81;SBC50;STfl£8i; RTS 
1310:PP0 CLC;LDR£80;RDC£85;STR£89;LORES1;RDC89;STfl£81; RTS 
1311:SS@ STYE83 
1312 : SSI LDR T;LDY£84 
1313:SS2 LDX£85 

1314:SS3 DEX;BNE SS3;E0R ®4;STR T;DEY;BNE SS2;LDY £83;RTS 
13183 

1319N.N;P.$6 
1320CLERR 8;S=9 

1321F.N=32768TQ32799; LINK FFQ;?N=127;N.N 
1322F.N=33248TQ33279;LINK FF9;?N=127;N.N 
1323F.N=32800TO3321S STEP32;LINK FF0;?N=127;N. H 
1324F.N=32831T033247 STEP 32;LINK FF9;?N=127;N.N 
1330?£36=£8F;?£87=£81 
13327ERR-2;?£90=15 
1333F.N=1T026;?£818F=£2fl;LINK FF9;?£8921=£30;?£8022=£2D; LINK.FF0 
1334 7 £8923=£2D;?£R024=£14;?£8925=£12;?£8026=£01;?£8027=£10 
133F.LINK FF9;?£818F=127;URIT;?£818F=£2B;F.G=£8021TO£8027; ?G=64 
1336N.G;LINK FF0;N.N;?£818F=127 
1339X=R. R. ■'.< 33278-33988 >+33988 
1340IF?X<>£49 G.1339 


40 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 














Adda Computers Ltd., a major supplier of computer systems 
"to industry and business, have opened the Vic Centre in 
'"West London. Here you can see, discuss and buy everything to do with 
^the new VIC 20 personal computer—in person or by mail. Hardware, 
software, technical advice and information is available from an experienced 
staff. Even if you already own a VIC 20, get on our mailing list to 
know about new developments. Remember—everything has the backing of 
Adda’s reputation, and there’s a full 12-month warranty on all hardware. 
The Vic Centre is easy to reach—Just off theA40, close to North Acton tube 
_ tion. 

Not just a computer but a whole 


expandable system 

AT ONLY £189-95 inc.VAT. Special cassette deck 
£44-95 inc.VAT. 

The VIC-20 is a fully fledged, easy-to-use computer. It’s the core 
of a great expandable system. 

★ EXPANDABLE MEMORY—UP TO 32K, USING PLUG-IN 
MODULES 

★ DISK DRIVE/CASSETTE-FOR EXTERNAL STORAGE. 

★ PRINTER—80 COLUMN, 30 CHARACTERS-PER-SECOND 
First time users can operate it immediately with plug-in program 
cartridges, and using your own colour T.V. to get up to 24 
colours on screen, four different sound tones and even write 
your own programs in BASIC. The VIC-20 lets you build a system 
as needs and budget dictate, so that your VIC-20 can be more 
than just a personal computer. 

VIC-MEMORY 3K £44.85 

Small size—low cost memory expansion. 

Plugs into Vic and reproduces memory-port. 

Can be used with other expansions gives a 
total of 6k user static ramon Vic. 

FEATURE This board allows Vic to move 
Basic to begin at 1024 ($0400) as in Pet, 
and enables the use of HIGH RESOLUTION 
COLOUR GRAPHICS 

VIC-LIGHT PEN £28.75 

This high quality light pen works in both 
normal and Hi-Res modes on the Vic 
allowing simple interaction with the Vic 
without keyboard entry. 

Easy to program and easy to use. 
e.g. Menu selection. Non-keyboard entry. 

Teaching Games. 

FEATURE touch sensitive “Enter” contacts 
to eliminate accidental entry. 

VIC-RS232 INTERFACE £56.35 

Fully implemented (true levels) 

RS232C-V24 

BI-DIRECTIONAL INTERFACE 

Allows Vic to work as Mainframe Terminal 
Drive a Qume Daisywheel or a Paper Tape 
Punch ©tc ©tc 

FEATURE This unit contains master power 
supply which supports Vic’s own supply 
when carrying Memory Expansions, 

Cassette Drives, Light Pens, Printers etc. 

VIC JOYSTICK Single £14.95 

Hand-Held joystick units for games use 
available in Pair or Single configuration. 

N.B. (2 Singles will not work as a pair 
unless modified) 

VIC-Games Port Adaptor Cable £19.85 

A two into one adaptor for use with both 
joysticks and light pens. A must for those 
who require full control of games with 
graphics. 

FEATURE low-cost High quality. Robust 




VIC-20 DOT MATRIX PRINTER 

Tractor feed, 80 character-per-line, 30 
characters-per-second. 

VIC SINGLE FLOPPY DISK DRIVE 

3K RAM CARTRIDGE 

8K RAM CARTRIDGE 

16K RAM CARTRIDGE 

PROGRAMMERS AID CARTRIDGE 

—an extension of BASIC to aid programming 

and de-bugging. 

MACHINE CODE MONITOR CARTRIDGE 

— includes assembler and dis-assembler 
capabilities. 

SUPER EXPANDER HIGH RESOLUT. CARTRIDGE 

— permits use of high resolution graphics. 


£229.95 


£ P.O.A. 
£29.95 
£44.95 
£74.95 
£34.95 


£34.95 


£34.95 


£14.95 




VIC software Each of these tapes 

Codebreaker/Codemaker 

You play the VIC or the VIC plays you in this computerised 
version of Mastermind. 

VIC Seawolf, VIC Trap and Bounce-out 
3 fun games, a submarine shoot out, a beat the VIC and an 
old favourite pub game.Good games with different skill levels. 
Monster Maze and Maths Hurdler 

A fun game with good colour and sound and a mental arithmetic 
learning game. Highly rated by everyone we have shown it to. 
Harder than you think. 

Canyon Fighter, Tunesmith, Star Wolf at £5.95 

VIC GAMES CARTRIDGES at £19.95 

each 

Fruit Machine, Lander, Road Rally, Alien, Avengers, Poker 

TERMS AND CONDITIONS: All goods sold subject to Adda 
terms and conditions of sale. Full details available on 
request, but include: 7 day money back guarantee, Adda 
12 month hardware warranty. Please allow 21 days 
for delivery. Allow 7 days for personal cheques to be 
cleared. Quoted prices are inclusive of VAT. 


rnnHc Prirp MAIL ORDER to: Adda Computers Limited, FREEPOST, London,. 

Goods Required _ W13 0BR or telephone your order (24 hours a day) to 

01-992 9904 quoting your BARCLAYCARD OR ACCESS 
—---- number. 

■ 1 " 1 * I enclose a cheque, made 

_____ payable to Adda Computers 

—”" Limited for 

Add £2.00 p. & p. for T t , £ P 

orders under £50.00 10131 1 - t oi * _ ', V 

Please charge my Barclay/Access _ — 

Name: ———- - account. My account number is 

Address. _ * please add my name to your A Jw V 

___ CVG4 - mailing list 

SHOP ADDRESS: Adda Home Computers Ltd. * Delete as appiicabie^^^^^^f 

154 , Victoria Road, Acton, London, W3. Tel 01-992 9904. Date: 

OPEN: 10 am—6 pm (Tuesday—Friday), 10 am—5 pm (Saturday). 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 41 





























ATARI 


® MAIL ORDER SOFTWARE 


ATARI SOFTWARE FROM ADVENTURE 


INTERNATIONAL 



Adventures 1-12 

24K(C) 

£16.50 each 

Star Trek 3.5 

24K(C) 

£16.50 

Sunday Golf 

16K(C) 

£12.50 

Angle Worms 

16K(C) 

£12.50 

Mountain Shout 

16K(C) 

£12.50 

Deflections 

16K(C) 

£12.50 

Lunar Lander 

24K(C) 

£12.50 

Galactic Empire 

24K(C) 

£16.50 

Galactic Trilogy 

24K(C) 

£16.50 

ATARI SOFTWARE FROM DYNACOMP 


Stud-Poker 

16K(C) 

£10.99 

Moon Probe 

16K(C) 

£9.99 

Alpha Fighter 

24K(C) 

£11.99 

Intruder Alert 

16K(C) 

£15.99 

Giant Slalom 

16K(C) 

£12.99 

Monarch 

16K(C) 

£10.99 

Crystals 

24K(C) 

£9.99 

Dominoes 

24K(C) 

£15.99 

Chomp-Reversi 

16K(C) 

£10.99 

Management Simulator 

24K(C) 

£15.99 

Space Tilt 

16K(C) 

£9.99 

Moving Maze 

16K(C) 

£9.99 

Rings of the Empire 

16K(C) 

£15.99 

Triple Blockade 

16K(C) 

£12.99 

Space Trap 

16K(C) 

£12.99 

Forest 

24K(C) 

£15.99 

CRYSTALWARE 



House of Usher 

D 

£19.99 

Galactic Quest 

D 

£19.99 

Sumer 

D 

£11.99 

Laser Wars 

D 

£19.99 

World War 3 

D 

£19.99 

Beneath the Pyramids 

D 

£19.99 

Sands of Mars 

D 

£26.99 

Little Crystal 

D 

£26.99 

Fantasy land 2041 

D 

£34.99 

Waterloo 

D 

£32.99 

Quest for Power 

D 

£26.99 

THORN EMI SOFTWARE NOW IN STOCK 


Home Financial Management 

(C) 

£19.95 

Humpty Dumpty & Jack and Jill 

(C) 

£19.95 

Hickerey Dickerey Dock & 



Ba Ba Black Sheep 

(C) 

£19.95 

British Heritage Jigsaw Puzzles 

(C) 

£19.95 

European Scene Jigsaw Puzzles 

(C) 

£19.95 

Darts 

(C) 

£19.95 

Cribbage & Dominoes 

(C) 

£14.95 

Snooker & Billiards 

(C) 

£19.95 

Tournament Pool & 8 Ball Pool 

(C) 

£19.95 

Jumbo Jet Lander 

(C) 

£29.95 

Submarine Commander 

(C) 

£24.50 

Rotate & Gilt (cube) 

(C) 

£14.95 


ATARI HARDWARE 

ATARI SOFTWARE 


400 16K 

£345 

Star Raiders 

£29.95 

800 16K- 

£645 

Missile Command 

£29.95 

410 (Recorder) 

£50 

Asteroids 

£29.95 

810 Disk Drive 

£345 

Chess (Rom) 

£24.50 

80 Col. Printer 
16K Ram Pack 

£550 

£65 

Basket Ball 

£24.50 


GALACTIC EXPEDITION 

From Earth to Moon 

D 

£26.99 

Mists of Venus 

D 

£19.99 

Planet Herman 

D 

£19.99 

The Asteroid Belt 

D 

£19.99 

Uranus — World of Ice 

D 

£19.99 

Jupiter — World of Dwarves 

D 

£19.99 

The Crystal Planet 

D 

£19.99 


ATARI PROGRAM EXCHANGE 



Data Management System 

32K(D) 

£20.50 

Blackjack Tutor 

16K(C) 

£16.75 

Video Math Flashcards 

8K(C) 

£11.25 

747 Landing Simulator 

24K(C) 

£16.75 

Eastern Front (1941) 

16K(C) 

£30.25 

Code Cracker 

8K(C) 

£11.25 

Domination 

24K(C) 

£16.75 

Terry 

32K(C) 

£11.25 

Bumper Pool 

16K(C) 

£11.25 

Tact Trek 

24K(C) 

£13.50 

Space Trek 

24K(C) 

£13.50 

Anthill 

8K(C) 

£11.25 

Centaurian 

16K(C) 

£13.50 

Minotaur 

24K(C) 

£11.25 

Outlaw/Howitzer 

24K(C) 

£16.75 

Lookahead 

24K(C) 

£11.25 

Babel 

16K(C) 

£16.75 

Avalanche 

16K(C) 

£16.75 

Graphics/Sound Demo 

32K(D) 

£16.75 

Sound Editor 

16K(C) 

£16.75 

Extended wsfn 

16K(C) 

£19.00 

Disk Fixer 

24K(D) 

£22.50 

Basic Utility for Renum. 

16K(C) 

£16.75 

Basic Program Compressor 

32K(C) 

£16.75 


AVALON HILL 

B-1 Nuclear Bomber 

16K(C) 

£12.50 

Midway Campaign 

32K(C) 

£12.50 

North Atlantic Convoy Raider 

16K(C) 

£12.50 

Planet Miners 

24K(C) 

£12.50 

Lords of Karma 

40K(C) 

£17.50 

Conflict 2500 

32K(C) 

£12.50 

Empire of the Overmind 

40K(C) 

£24.95 

Tanktics 

24K(C) 

£19.95 


GALACTIC CHASE 

16K cassette £15.95. A fast real time 
galaxian type game. Employing to the 
fullest ability the graphics and sound 
capability of the Atari computer. 




^ Le STICK £25 

The latest joystick type control employing 
mercury switches. 


We also carry a large range of software for TRS-80 and Apple computers send 50p for catalogues. 

(C) = Cassette All prices include VAT 


Trade enquiries for software welcome. 

Mail order available all prices include P & P 


CALIST* 

COMPUTERS LIMITED 


SPECIALISTS IN MICROCOMPUTER HARDWARE & SOFTWARE 


119 John Bright Street 

BIRMINGHAM 

B1 1 BE Phone: 021-632 6458 


42 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 











1370?:*!=!'! 

1375G0S.r 

17:77IF ?<X+D><>£40 G.1375 
1379?X=64LINK FF0?(X+D )=M > X=CX+D >; 8 *? 8 +1 
1380UNK K.K0 

13FI0IF X=£8021 AND ?£8822=127 AND ?£8041=127 G. 10300 

H001F?<X+1)=127AND?<X-1)=127AN07CX~£20 > 127AND?< X+£20>=127G.V 

2805G.1375 

3080 r fl=< A. R. ’/A >+1 

3001 IF A=1 D=-32;R. 

3062IF A=2 D=32.; R. 

3903IF A=3 D=-l;R. 

3004IF A=4 D=1•R. 

10000 F. N= 1T840?£83=66 ? £84=66 :• L INK 380 
10020?£84=32i?£83=32>LINK SS0;N.N 
1 1000P. $12.: F', "THE ALIEN IS IN THE TRAP!!!" 

1S030F.N=1TO80}WRIT > N.N 
18948P. $ 12 > P."vnijR SCORE IS... "S' " " 

1895SGQ5.v■G.1320 

200011F.R=1T039 s LINK FF0 i ?X=63;LINK FF@ » ?X=24iN.fl 
20002?. $ 12P." YOUR SCORE IS " S+2985 "!!!!"" 

20003F=180iD=109 

20004F.0=1T044;?£34=D;?£85=F;LINK SS0;D=D-2;F=F-ijN.O 
20005 F. I=1T044?£84*D > ?£85=F s LI NK SS9; D=D+2 i F=F+1 > N. I; P. *? 
2000SP."YOU'VE CRUSHED"' 

20007P. "THE ALIEN ?£E1=8 

20010F. N= 1T0893WAIT i N. N; G. 1320 
32000CP.*12;P. "#**#***«!ie-ft tr-aP ttttttt”' 

32101P."TRAP THE""ALIEN""IN THE TOP"' 

32182P."L.H. CORNER OF THE SCREEN"' - 
32103P."USING THE FOLLOWING KEYS : "'' “ 

32104P. "3 .IS FOR LEFT",'' 

32105P."RETURN. ..IS FOR RIGHT"" 

32106P."UP/DOWN ARROW..IS FOR DOWN"" 

32107P."AND L/R ARROW.IS FOR UP"" > F.J=1TG5;GOS.bjN.J 

32108P."DJSE ""SHIFTED""KEYS TO ERASE3"''jF,N*lTQ10jGOS.b;N.N 
32109P. "Press shift to coritinue" 

32110DO WAIT;U.?£B801< >£FF 

321 i IF. N=£8800TO£81FF j ?N=32N. N } R. 

32112bF. N= 1 TO 60WR ITN. NR. 

32120v?£El=0;IF S<*100 P." EXCELLENT";G.32130 

32121 IF S<=175 P."VERY GOOD";G.32138 

321221F S< =210 P."GOOD"G. 32130 

321231F S< =245P." AVERAGE"G. 32130 

32 1 241F S< =390 P." POOR"G. 32138 

32125IF S<=480P."BAD";G.32138 

32126IF S<=508 P."VERY BAD";G.32130 

32130GOC. bR. 









































































RUNS ON A TANDY TRS 


RY MAX CHAUVET 


To reach the final of a Grand Prix 
race you must first experience a 
gruelling qualifying round in 
which speed alone counts. 

You control a Formula One 
car, aiming to complete one lap 
of the international race track in 
the shortest possible time. The 
car travels at top speed on the 
straight sections of the circuit, 
but you must steer it round the 
corners, some of them sharp 


10000 ’ GRAND PRIX RACING 
10010 ’ 1980. H.CHAUVET 
10020 CLEAR500:DEFINTA-Y:CLS 

10025 RPS=0:RO=0:RD=0:EC=0:B=0:KB=0:LC=0:RC=0:TM=2:2=0:T=0:BZ=17 
:UN=1:NL=128 
10026 SN=0:LP=0:DX=10:SC=600:T1=0:T2=0 
T0040 M*=STRING$(255,0):H0$=STRIN6*(75,0) 

10050 ADDR=VARPTR(N04):IFPEEK(16396)=201 THENPQKE16526,PEEKtAD+1 
):P0KE16527,PEEK(AD+2) 

10052 FST=AD 

10054 ZD=PEEK(AD+1) +PEEK(AD+2U256 
10056 IF ZD>32767 ZD=ZD-65536 
i0058 AD=ZD 

10060 IFPEEK(16396)O201THEN DEFUSR0=AD:CMD"T" 

10070 CAR=ADDR+182 
10080 EC=16: DIN LAP(50) 

10090 KB0ARD=14400 : TH0=2 : BL=32 
10100 B$=STRIN8$(8,24) : Ct=CHR$(26) 

10110 A*=STRIMG»(2,176)+LEFT*(B*,4)+C*+”#-“+STRlNB»(2,191)+“-#“+ 
LEFT$(B$,5)+Ct+CHRt(170)+CHRt(93)+CHR4(94)+CHR$(149)+LEFT$ 
(B$,6)+C*+"M-"+STRING$(2,191)+ , -i#"+LEFT$(B$,5)+C*+CHR* 

(34)+CHR4(34) 

10200 ’ SCROLLING ROUTINE 

10210 DATA CD7FOA7D00018E40C5FD21BDOOFD09DD218600DD092600DD6EOOO 


bends. 

When the car is steered to the 
right or left it automatically 
slows down so a good tactic to 
employ is to manoeuvre the car 
as little as possible to keep at 
the highest speed you can with¬ 
out crashing. 

If your steering fails you then 
you end up off the track and 
crash into the rails. Don’t 
despair if that happens, you find 
the seconds will tick quickly 
away building up your final lap 
time, but you don't have to start 
the lap again. 

You will need a TRS-80 Level II 
with 16K memory to run this 
program. 

To control the car you use the 
arrow keys to turn the steering 
wheel to right or left, but those 
are all you can use. There is no 
accelerator or brake for you to 
take advantage of, you have to 
rely on your steering to see you 
through. Be careful not to keep 
one of the arrow keys depressed 
because if you do the car will 
continue turning. 

An extra feature written into 
this program comes near the end 
of the lap. When you near the 
finish line the lap record (time 
for you to beat) is displayed on 
the left of the screen, while on 
the right hand side of the screen 
your own lap time is shown to 
see if an extra spurt of speed is 
needed. 


1 



10220 DATA 003C09C1B72802FDE9114003E519E5D101400009EBOE10ED 
10230 DATA B0110003E1E519E5D101400009EB0E38EDB011BF02E1E519E5D1 
10240 DATA D1400009EB0E39EDB0117F02E1E519E5D101400009EBOE3AEDBO 
10250 DATA 113D02E1E519E5D101400009EBOE3CEDB011EE02FDE1FDE5FD19 
10260 DATA FD7EO0FD771OFD7E01FD7711FD7E18FD7708FD7E19FD7709113A 
10270 DATA 022600DD6E0019E5FDEIE119E5D101400009EBFDE5C1EDB83E00 
10280 DATA C900000000000000 
10290 ’ HOVE CAR 

10300 DATA DD213101DD093D20313E05117C0219E5D11313E50600DD4EOOED8 
823E5FDE1FD4610 

10310 DATA FD7000FD4611FD7001E13DC80600DD4E0109DB23DD231BD53E051 
10A00DD19117B02 

10320 DATA 19E5D11B1BE50600DD4EOOED80011200ED42E5FDE1FD4600FD701 
0FD 

10330 DATA 4601FD7011E13DC80600DD4E0109DD23DD2318D1 
10340 DATA 0242063F044208400500 
10350 DATA 023E0641043E08400500 
10360 DATA END 

10370 READ D* : IF D*=’END* THEN 10440 ELSE 60SUB 15000 
10380 F0RI=tT0LEN(D$)STEP2 
10390 D=ASC(HID*(D»,I,1>>:D1=ASC<NID$(D$,1+1,1)> 

10400 IFD>57THEND=D-7 
10410 IFD1>57THENDl=Dl-7 
10420 D=(D-48)ll6+Dl-48 : POKE ADDR,D : AD=AD+1 
10430 NEXT I : GOTO 10370 
10440 DATA 0,1,1,2,3,3,2,1,1,0 
10450 F0RI=1T010:READC(I):NEXTI 
10460 POKE ZD+6,PEEK(FST+1) 

10470 POKE ZD+7,PEEK(FST+2) 

10500 ’ CIRCUIT SET UP 

10510 TH=30+RND(20): TB=TH»10.1: TK=TH-5i TL=TH-1: CN=0 


10520 FOR 1=2 TO TH-2: DIR=RND(3)-2sCN=CN+DIR:IFABS(CK)>1THENCN= 

CN-2»DIR:DIR=-DIR 

10524 IF PRV=0 PRV=DIR 

10526 IF DIR THEN IF DIR=PRV THEN TB=TB+14:PRV=DIR ELSE TB=TB+ 6 s 
PRV=0IR 

10530 LAP(I)=DIR:NEXTI 


10540 LAP(1)=0:LAP(TN)=0:LAP(TN-1)=0sCLS 

10542 PRINTB466,"THE CIRCUIT IS "5 sPRINTUSING - #.I# NILES L0NG";T 


H/20; 

10545 PRINTG530,"THE LAP RECORD IS * 5 sTl=TB/600sT2=TB-T1*600:PRI 


44 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 
















KTUSINS"!#:II.#“;T1,T2/10; iTB$="“ 

10547 FORI*548T0554:TB*=TB*+CHR*(PEEK(15360+1>)sNEXT 

10548 ME*=TB*! 11*548 : 60SUB21000: FOR I=1T0200: NE XT I: CLS 
10550 CH$*CHR$(28)+CHR4(255) 

10570 CLS: PR1NTJ671,A»; 

10580 POKE CAR,34: RCRASH=15360+733+EC+1: LCRASH=RC+5-2*EC-l 
10590 RPS*15384: ROAD*132: RD=13 
10600 FOR LP=1 TO TH 

10610 SN*LAP(LP>: IF SN THEN R0=132:RD=0 ELSE RD=13 

10620 F0RI*lT010sRPS=RPS+C(I> tSN:I=USR(01:PRINTCHij:POKE RPS.RO: 

POKE RPS+EC,RO:RO=RO+RD:RD=-RDs B1=B:B=PEEKIKB>:IF SN POKE RPS-U 

N,NL:POKE RPS+QZ,NL 

10625 IFB*0THEN10800 

10630 T*T+2 :IFB=32THEN10700 

10650 Z Z USR41):POKE CAR,PEEK(CAR)+TKO:LC=LC+TWO:RC=RC+T«0:S0T010 
710 

10700 Z=USR(2):P0KE CAR,PEEK(CAR)-TNO:LC*LC-TNO:RC*RC-THO 
10710 IFBD0THENIFB1OBTHEN12000 

10800 IFPEEK(LC)=BLANDPEEK(LC-1)=BL AND PEEK(RC)=BLANDPEEK(RC+1) 
=BL 60T011000 

10810 T*T+20: IF PEEK(LOOBLORPEEK (LC-1 )<>BLTHEN LEFT=0 ELSE LE 
FT*-1 

10812 Ll*PE£K(CAR)+640: IF LEFT THEN L1=L1-17 
10815 PRINT8L1," ICRASHt"; 

10820 IF NOT(LEFT) THEN 60SUB20000:60SUB20010:60SUB20000:60SUB20 
000 ELSE 60SUB20010:60SUB20000:60SUB20010: 6QSUB20010 



10830 F0RL=1T050:NEXTL 
10850 PRINT8L1,CHR$<201); 

11000 HEXTI 

11010 T=T+DX: IFLP<TKTHEN11200 

11020 T1=T/SC:T2=T-T1*SC:PRINT8965,TB$j:PRINT91010,$:PRINTUSIN6" 
11:14.l'|Tl,T2/DXj 

11030 IFLP=TLTHENPRINT8RPS-15360,STRIN64(5,153)"F1NISH"STR1N6J(5 
,166); 

11200 NEXT LP 

11205 FORI=1T010:PRINT80,CHR*(255);:Z=USR(0):NEXT I 

11210 IFT<TB THEN ME4*"Y0U BROKE THE LAP RECORD !■:H=470:B0SUB21 

000:60T011280 

11220 IFT-TB>200 PR1NTJ464,"Y0UR DRIVER’S LICENCE HAS BEEN CANCE 
LLED!":60T011280 

11230 IFT-TBMOO PR INTJ464, "PERHAPS YOU NEED A HIDER TRACK”:60T0 
11280 

11240 PRINTJ464,"YOU’VE QUALIFIED IN 

11250 PLACE* INT ((T-TB)/5)+1: IFPL=1 THENPRI NT * 1ST"; ELSE I FPL=2THENP 
RINT"2ND“;ELSEIFPL=3THERPRINT"3RD";ELSEPRINTPLACE“TH"} 

11260 PRINT" PLACE"; 

11280 T=0 

11290 F0RI*1T01000:NEXTI 

11300 PRINTB528,CHR*(31);"H1T ENTER TO TRY AGAIN OR" 

11305 PRINTB592,"X TO MOVE TO ANOTHER CIRCUIT"; 

11310 Y«*INKEY4:IFY»*CHR$(13)THEN10570ELSEIFY4*"X"THEN10500ELSE1 
1310 

12000 IF B=32 THEN L1*LC-15360-6:LEFT*-1 ELSE L1=RC-15360+1:LEFT 
=0 

12005 L1=570+PEEK(CAR) 

12010 PRINT9L1,"QOQPS!";: FORL=1T050:NEXTL: PRINT9L1,CHR$(198); 

12020 IF LEFT THEN12500 

12030 IFPEEK(LC)<>BL0RPEEK(LC-1)<7BLTHEN12600 

12040 60SUB20010:GOTO12030 

12500 IFPEEK(RC)<>BLORPEEK(RC+1)<>BLTHEN12600 

12510 G0SUB20000:6GT012500 

12600 T*T+10 

12620 60T010812 

15000 PART*PART+1: IFINT(PART/2II20PART RETURN 
15050 ONPART/2GQT016000,16025,16030,16040,16050,14070 
15060 RETURN 

16000 PRINT925,"** GRAND PRIX »»" 

16010 PRINT9192,"YOU ARE ABOUT TO TAKE PART IN THE QUALIFYING SE 
SSION" 

16020 PRINT'OF AN INTERNATIONAL GRAND PRIX RACE." 

16022 RETURN 

16025 PRINT"YOUR ’FORMULA ONE’ CAR IS CONTROLLED BY THE ARROW KE 
YS "CHR$(93)* AND ‘CHR4194) 

16027 RETURN 

16030 PRINT’YOU HILL TRY TO TURN IN THE FASTEST LAP KEEPING IN N 
IND THAT :" 

16035 RETURN 

16040 PRINT" - EVERY TIHE YOU STEER YOU LOOSE 2/10 OF A SECO 
ND* 

16042 PRINT" SO YOU SHOULD DRIVE CLOSE TO EDGE OF THE TRAC 
K." 

16045 RETURN 

16050 PRINT" - IF YOU LEAVE THE TRACK YOU’LL BOUNCE BACK IN 
AND* 

16040 PRINT" LOOSE 2 SECONDS" 

16065 RETURN 

16070 PRINT" - IF YOU CHANGE STEERING DIRECTION TOO SUDDENLY 
YOU" 

16080 PRINT" HILL SKID, LEAVE THE TRACK AND LOOSE 1 SECOND 

• 

17000 RETURN 

20000 Z*USR(2):POKE CAR,PEEK(CAR)-THO:LC=LC-THO:RC=RC-THO 
20008 RETURN 

20010 Z*USR(1):PQKE CAR,PEEK(CAR)+THO:LC=LC+THO:RC=RC+THO 
20020 RETURN 

21000 FORK=1T010:PRINTJN,CHR$(192+LEN(HE4));:FORI*1T050:NEXTI:PR 
INTJH, HE*;: FOR I* 1T025: NEXT I, K: RETURN 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 45 




















RUNS ON 


SHARP MZ-80K 


IN22K 




RY TONY WINDIRANK 


The words, "Dr Livingstone, I 
presume", immortalised reporter 
Stanley's search for the missing 
African explorer. 

Dr Livingstone is lost in dark¬ 
est Africa again in this Sharp 
game but no message has been 
heard from him for five years. 
His rescue is your objective in Dr 
Livingstone, but the African 
jungle holds many dangers and 
the porters are a notoriously 
fickle bunch. 

You take the part of journalist 
Henry Morton Stanley, charged 
with the job of equipping an 
expedition to find the great man. 
To cover expenses you have 
150,000 annas which should be 
used to purchase food, medicine, 
beads, guns, ammunition and 
for the hiring of porters. 

The dangers include: wild 
animals, diseases, unfriendly 
tribes and treacherous rivers. 

The variables used in the 
game are: D = number of porters; 
F = the number of medical 
boxes; C = number of annas (an 
African coin); G = number of 
boxes of beads; E = food packs; 
H = number of guns; K = boxes 
of ammunition. 

The main subroutines are 
shown by REMs and are: 

• Native tribe routine — lines 
1300-1620. 

• Disease routine — lines 
1620-1920. 

• Wild animal routine — lines 
1920-2180. 

• River delay routine — lines 
2180-2860. 

• Witch doctor routine — lines 
2860-3490. 

• Perfect week routine — lines 
3490-3580. 

The game can be made harder 
by making the minimum number 
of porters 150 and altering lines 
900 and 930. 



_ 


46 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 


























•37ffc i 




10 REM **fjMAKI$p BOX FOR TITLi*<*'* 

20 PRINT ’'IS" 

30 OlSOOfo# Z»c| D2«0s A7fp3831 s IjsfH 
40 B 3'=5377 5 I 

50 FOR A =*53574 TO 53602 f 
60'POKE Af.163 1 

70 NEXT f 

80 FOR A= 536 42 fo 53801 SI FP 40 
90 POKE (All63 | 

100 NEXT Cl I- 

110 FOR A-S3802 |rO 53774 STEP-1 

120 POKE 4163 4 
130 NEXT 4 I 

140 FOR A=%3734 10 53614 STEP~4<> 

150 POKE a|163 * 

160 NEXT .1 I 

170 POKE 4466, 10SPRINT "SSSSSBSe*' 

\ 180 A*= " Dr t_i vi ngat.one, I presume?" 

190 FOR A= 1 TO LE|l <A$> 

200 PRINT M$D* (All A, 1) ; \ || M 11/ 

210 FOR B-“l I TO 50§ NEXT B 
220 NEXT A 

230 FOR A—1 TO lOfOsNEXT 
240 REM *# INSTRUCTIONS ** 

250 PRINT "Is" 

260’ PRINT TAB(14 >;"INSTRUSTiQfB " 

270 PRINT TAB <14)?"--- 

280 PRINT "In thi|| game, you are the journa M sil!" 

290 PRINT "Henry Morton Stan Bey. Ili^s object of the!!!'" 
.300 PRINT "game i.|i to find the African explorer B" 

310 PRINT "Dr. Li vfjngstone, wh© has been missir^R* 

320 PRINT "for fi||e years,,13" 

330 PRINT "SYou «=#-e given 15*>000 afrits < the currency!!!" 
340 PRINT "Bof Z4^ibar> to If it ouj an expedition^" 
350 PR I NT " t o f 3 nd Dr L. i v i n gst one „ OH!!" 

360 PRINT TAB<3>?"ANY KEY FOR FURTHER INSTRUCTIONS" 
370 GET B*: IF B*=*" " I HEN 370 | 

380 PRINT "IS" 

!SWi t h .this maney y ou must buy med i C i nei« S3 " 
f ood, |nltns, ammuniti on and beads for theB" 
nat i ve I chi ef s on y our route';, .You mustS" 
also fay for the hire of porters. The!!;!"- • 
asts for si ; x rounds. 11 
"83ANY KEY TO STA^T 1 
"THEN 450 I 
AFRICA ** 


"game 


390 PRINT- 
400 PRINT 
410 PRINT- 
420 PRINT 
430 PRINT 
440 PRINT TAB <12§ 

450 GET B$: IF B*J= 

460 REM ** MAP Of 
470 PRINT "IS" 

480 DIM X <203) , Y|<j203>. 
490 DI MV (150-) , W( jlj50) 
500 FOR ,7=1 TO 2p3 
510 READ X <J ) , Y(|T) 

520 SET X(J),Y(JH 
530 NEXT- 
540 FOR J=1 TO 1 


590 DATA 


6:READ V(J),W(J)sNEXT 
1,3b,1 


11 . 

. o, 

16j 

rb, 

29, 

i 0 

, 10. 

, 1 ; 

31. 

■ 1 f 


"t, 

34, 

1 

, 35, 

i 1. 

13, 

2 

14, 

2 

15. 

i 2 

, 1 7. 

, 3, 

27, 

, 5, 

34, 

; 5 , 

12 , 

,6 

, 24. 

,6 

32 

,6, 

33', 

, 6, 

34, 

. 6 

,40, 

, 6, 

41, 

^8, 

42, 

,8, 

44. 

,8 

, 45. 

.8, 

8 , 

10 , 

35. 

, 10,31 

7 , 

10, 47 

47 

, 12 

!, 5. 

, 13, Z< 


13,38 


18,3,19,3, 
25,6,26,6, 


15 , 

, 14 , 


4,16,4,12,3 
4, 21/4,35,-4, 

30,6,3 iV'6,23,5,23,5 

41,6, 11,7,41,7,114,7,9,8, 34,8,35, 8, 10, 7 
46,8,9,9,34,9,3|,9,43,9,46,9,47,9 
10,7,11,35,11,37,11,48,11,6,12,36,12,38,12 
13,47,13,5,14,3b,14,39,14,45,14,46,14,5,15,Z 
630 DATA 38, 15,40, 15,44, 15,6, 16,39,16,41,16 .#42, 16,43, 16,7, 17,40, 17 
640 DATA 7,18,40,18,41,18,42,18,43,18,8,19,44,19,9,20,43,20,9,21,10,21,1, 
650 DATA 43,21,11,22,12,22,15,22,16,22,18,22,19,22,42,22,2 


660 DATA 13 
670 DATA 22 
680 DATA 21 


23 14.23 

24,41,24,21,25,33, 
27,32,27,35,27,38, 


25,40, 

28,34, 


25,21,26,: 

28,38,28,: 


, 26,35, 26', 39,2 i 
,29,38,29 


\l/ * 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 47 













_ 



'vy 


690 DATA 23,30,38,30,24,31,38,31,24,32,39,32,24,33,39,33,43,33,23,34,39,34 

700 DATA 42,34,44,34,22,35,38,35,42,35,44,35,22,36, 37,36,41,36,44,36 

710 DATA 23,37,36,37,40,37,43,37,23,38,36,38,40,38,43,38,24,39,35,39,40,39 

720 DATA 43,39,24,40,36,40,40,40,42,40,24,41,35,41,36,41,41,41,42,41,24,42 

730 DATA 35,42,41,42,25,43,34,43,25,44,33,44,26, 45, 32,45, 26,46,30,46,31,46 

740 DATA 27,47,29,47,30,47,28,48 

750 POKE 53868,107 

760 POKE 53863,152 

770 POKE 4466,1 

780 PRINTTAB(23);"*-The island of" 

790 PRINT TAB(26)f"Zanzibar where" 

800 PRINT TAB(27)$"Byou start." 

810 POKE 4466,10 

820 PRINT TAB(24);"x-Livingstone" 

830 PRINT TAB(26);"thought to be" 

840 PRINT TAB(27);"in this area." 

850 PRINT TAB(26); "SaaaPRESS ANY KEY" 

860 GET B$:IF B*="" THEN 860 
870 REM ** FITTING EXPEDITION ** 

880 PRINT "E" 

890 G0SUB4780 

900 PRINT:PRINT "How many porters(minimum one hundred) do" 

910 PRINT "you wish to hire at a cost of 100 annasa" 

920 INPUT "per week ?“;D 

930 IF D<100 THEN PRINT "BS":GQT0920 

940 PRINT:PRINT 

950 PRINT "Each porter consumes two packs of fooda" 

960 PRINT "(costing 30 annas) per week.How manya" 

970 INPUT "packs of food do you wish to buy ?";E 
980 IF E<0 THEN PRINT "BB":G0T0 970 
990 C=C-30*E 

1000 IF C<0 THEN PRINT"EYou have spent all the expedition funds3a n :GOTO 4450 
1010 PRINT:PRINT 

1020 PRINT "How many boxes of medicine at 1500 annas" 

1030 INPUT "do you wish to buy ?";F 

1040 IF F<0 THEN PRINT "SB":GOTO 1030 

1050 C=C-1500*F 

1060 IF C<0 THEN 1000 

1070 PRINT"E":60SUB4780 

1080 PRINT"8How many boxes of beads(at 160 annas a " 

1090 PRINT"abox) do you wish to buy for native " 

1100 INPUT"achiefs on the route ?";G 
1110 IF G<0 THEN PRINT "BBB":GOTO 1100 
1120 OC~G*160 
1130 IF C<0 THEN 1000 

1140 PRINT"33How many guns at 2000 annnas each do " 

1150 INPUT"8you wish to buy ?";H 
1160 IF H<0 THEN PRINT"BBB":GOTO 1150 
1170 C=C-H*2000 
1180 IF C<0 THEN 1000 

1190 PRINT"aaHow much ammunition at 500 annas a box" 

1200 INPUT"3do you wish to buy ?"?K 

1210 IF K<0 THEN PRINT"BBB":GOTO 1200 

1220 OC-K*500 

1230 IF C<0 THEN 1O00 

1240 FOR 1=1 TO 500:NEXT:GOTO 3740 

1250 PRINT "E" 

1260 PRINT TAB(17);"WEEK"; Z + l 

1270 Z*=STR*(Z)SPRINT:FOR 1 = 1 TO (LEN ( 1%) -+-5) 

1280 PRINT TAB (16+1); "B"*": NEXT 

1290 FORA=1T0800:NE X T 

1300 REM ** NATIVE TRIBE ROUTINE ** 

1310 L=RND (1) i 

1320 IF L>0.5THEND2=D2+1:GOTO1630 

1330 M=INT(RND <I)*350)+100 

1340 N=INT(M/8.7) 

1350 PRINT"BYour expedition has met a native.tribe" 

1360 PRINT"Sof";M;" men.The chief demands";N;" boxes" 

1370 PRINT"aof beads or he will fight you.Do you " 

1380 INPUT "Bwish to give him the beads ?";P* 

1390 IF P*="N"THEN1470 
< 1400 IF P*="Y"THEN1420 
{ 1410 PR I NT "BBB "-.GOTO 1380 

11420 G=6~N:IFG<0THENPRINT"3BY0U HAVEN'T ENOUGH BEADS,YOU MUST FIGHT" 

1 1430 IF G<0 THEN FOR 1=1TO1500:NEXT:GOTO1470 
1440 PRINT "33 The chief thanks you and allows you toBpass. " 
l 1450 FOR A=1 TO 3500:NEXT 
1460 GOTO 1610 

1470 IF H<=0 THEN 5=1:G0T04730 


48 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



$ 


i 

i 

i 



















to use ? " ;U 

• F;" boxes of medicine" 


1480 IF K<=0 THEN S=2:GOTO 4730 

1490 IF D< 50 THENPRI NT" SSSEYou have onl y " ; D; "■ porters left and 

1500 I FD< 50THENPRI NT" Sy our expedition has been overwhelmed by" _ 

1510 I FD< 50 THEN PR I NT "Bt he enemy tr i be. " x F 0 RA =1 TGpOOO: NEXTs PRINT'dS" : GOT 0445O 
1520 F'RINT"SS BATTLE !!! You have defeated the enemy" 

1530 P=INT((M*3 >/<(D~(D/1.3))+4*H)):D=D~ P 
1540 Q=INT((H/4)+(M/100))sIF Q>K THENQ=KsK=K-Q 
1550 R=1 +1NT(RND(1> *4):IF R>H THENR=H :H=H-R 
1560 PRINT"tribe but you have lost";f;" porters.You" 

1570 PRINT"Shave also used" 5 Q;" boxefe of ammunition" 

1580 PRINT"Sand";R 5 " puns have been stolen.":FpRA=lTQ1000xNEX T 
1590 PRINT"BB5EHEBBPRESS ANY KEY‘TO CONTINUE" 

1600 GET B*: IF B*="" THEN 1600 
1610 PRINT"E" 

1620 REM ** DISEASE ROUTINE ** 

1630 T=RND<1) 

1640 IF T>0.3 THEN D2=D2+1:G0T0L920 
1650 V=INT(RND <1> * 4 > +1 
1660 IF V=1 THEN C$=" cholera" :A2=5 
1670 IF V=2 THEN C$=" malaria":A2-8 
1680 IF 0=3 THEN C$=" yellow f ever": A2-.3 
1690 IF 0=4 THEN C*=" typhoi d " s;A2=2 

1700 PRINT "BSSSSEYour expedition is suffering from anS" 

1710 PR INT "out br eak of";C$ x " . " 

1720 IF F=0 THEN PRINT "BBYou have no medicine left.Your Entire" 

1730 IF F=0 THEN PRINT "Sexpedition is wiped out! ! " xFOR A=lT05000x NEXT 
1740 IF F=0 THEN PRINT "E":G0T04450 
1750 PRINT "SHow many boxes "; 

1760 INPUT "of medicine do you wish! 

1770 IFU>FTHENPRINT"SSYou have only 
1780 IF U>F THEN FOR A=1T03000:NEXT 
1790 IF U>F THEN PRINT "E"aGOTO 1700 

1800 IF U < 2 THEN PRINT "BEBecause you refused to give out medicine" ^ _ 
1810 IF U<2 THEN PRINT "to your porters they have all died"sFOR A=1T03000 
1820 IFU<2THEN NEXTA:PRINT"E" xGOTO 4450 
1830 F=F-U 

1840 A3= INT (D/ <A2*IJ> ) 

1850 IF A3=0 THEN PRINT "SSEEYou are a good doctor!! None of your 
1860 IF A3=0 THEN PRINT "Sporters died of ";0$;" . " x GOTO 1900 
1870 PRINT "SSEEAs a result of the out break of 
1880 PRINT "SS "5 C$s" your expedition has lost "5 A3 
1390 PRINT "Sporters." 

1900 D=D~A3 

1910 FOR A=1 TO 5000:NEXT 
1920 REM ** WILD ANIMAL. ROUTINE ** 

1930 PRINT"E":A4=RND<1> 

1940 IF A4>0.6 THEND2=D2f1:G0TQ2190 
1950 A5=INT <RND <1)*5)+1 

1960 IF A5=1 THEN Df="lions" j? 

1970 IF A5=2 THEN D$=" 1 eopards": 

1980 tF A5=3 THEN "el ephants" 

1990 IF A5=4 THEN D$="tigers" 

2000 IF A5=5 THEN D$="a rhinoceros" . m 

2010 PRINT"SSSEEYour expedition is being attacked by 
2020 PRINT"S";D*s".Do you wish to use ulns or* 

10-50 PR I NT" Sdo you want l he nor fere to use -l hei r " 

2040 PRINT "!!!!sp ear s < G or S "> ?'' 

2050 GET ESx IF F*=""THEN 2050 

2060 IF E$="S" THEN 211.0 .... 

2070 IF K=0 THEN PRINT"SKSSYou have no ammunition left, me 
2080 IF K=0 THEN PR INT "Sporters must, use their spears. 601021 io 
2090 PRINT"BEESVery goodfBut you used 1 ho! of" j 

2100 P RI NT "S ammunition. " :: FOR A~ ; hl TO < 40 nox NEX I s K- : K- Is GO 10^.1. 0. 

2110 A6=IN T (RND U > *7)+2 

21.20 D=D”A6 , . , , M 

?i70 jp i) o THEN PRINT "SS KEY our last per ter has been ki;l|ed by _ 

2140 IF D<0 THEN PRINT"S" 5 D*; " . " x FOR A- 1 TO 4000? NEX'l : PRINT "K" * GO I 044^0 
2150 F'R I NT " SSEEYou callous beast ! 1 You Snc:r .1 f .i ced " 5 . A 6 
2160 PR I NT "Sporters in order to save a.mmui 00 ion. 

2170 FOR T - I TO VYOOiNEX I ' 

218 0 R Etr « RIV E R D E L AY**" 

2190 PRINT "E" s B4=RNDX1 ) s B5=Os B6- : 0 
2200 IF U4 0.2 THEND2=D2+1:SOT02830 
2210 PRINT "SEEUnfortunately your hun lias" 

"Bgone a bit off course and in front of" 

" By ou is a river full 'of hungry croc 
"Sodi les. You have to tuj Id a boaL :: :..I j t. 

"Sthi s means feeding the porters while? .it" 

■■ySj’ci being built.So the dunce is as shown" 

BT j. me to Bui Id" : PRINT TAB (23) ; "BStrengtf 

..—.- "SPRINT TAB (23) ; "52.~. 

B J. week " s PR INI 1 AB (28) x .If Slt>tur dy 
!!!! day s" s PR J NT T AB < 25) ; " SRather 
• 1 • FOR FIRST CHOICE OTHERWISE 
"THEN 2320 
360 



cd Boat" 


FIirosy" 


2220 PRINT 
2230 PRINT 
2240 PRINT- 
2250 PRINT- 
2260 PRINT- 
2270 PRINT TABU):;" 

2280 PRINT T AB (1) ;; " 

2290 PRINT TAB<3>;" 

2300 PR I NT TAB ( 3 > r, " 

2310 PRINT "SSEKEY 
2320 GET BSxIF B$=" 

2330 IFB$="1"THEN 2 
2340 IFBf="2"THEN 2440 
2350 GOTO 2320 
2360 REM ** B$=="l" ** 

2370 E=E-<D*2> 

2380 IF ECO THEN PR I NT "E" s P0KE4466 .,f; 

2390 IF E<0 THEN PRINT"Your food supply has run out.The" 

O A o o T F F •' O T IT E N P RIN T '' S p o r t e r s h a v e r e be 1. 1 e d a n d t h rowri you" _ 

2410 IFE<OTHENPRINT"Bto the crocodiles. FflRA=n Q45o0s NE;X I As PRINT "IS : GOT 044ut 
2420 B5=RND(1) 

2430 GOTO 2490 
2440 REM ** B$="2" ** 

2450 E=E-INT(D*1) 

2460 IF E<0 THEN 2380 
2470 B6=RND <1) 

2480 GOTO 2490 
2490 REM ** THE CROSSING *# 

2500 B7=22:B8=1 
2510 PRINT "E" 

2520 I*=" 

















































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enquires 
^welcome 


50 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 

























































































































2540 Y$= 


r 


2550 P0KE4466,8:PRINTTAB<B8);X$ 
2560 P0KE4466,9sPRINTTAB (B8);Y* 

2570 PR I NT " —___ 

2580 POKE 4466,19s PRINT"—- 

2590 PRINT "Cl" 

2600 PRINTTAB <30>; 

2610 PRINTTAB<30);" />\ 

2620 PRINTTAB(30); 1 
2630 PRINTTAB(30)s 1 
2640 PRINTTAB<30)s 1 
2650 U*=" :< *o 
2660 V*= 

2670 W*= 


• |\ 
m 

, \ 


sito m 

wr 


T 


2680 POKE 4466,16 s PRINTTAB < B7);U* 

2690 POKE 4466,17s PRINTTAB(B7); 

2700 POKE 4466,18s PRINTTAB(B7);W$ 

2710 IFB5>.9THENP0KE4466,21s PRINT"EUnlucky.A crocodile ^has sunk your .boat 
2720 IFB5>.9G0T0 4820 

2730 IFB6>. 4THENP0KE4466, 21: PR I NT "S Your boat was to f ]|i msy . I tVhas gyrik . 
2740 IFB6>.6G0T0 4820 
2750 FOR I=B8T026 
2760 P0KE4466,8 
2770 PRINTTAB <I);X$ 

2780 PRINTTAB(I);Y$ 

2790 F0RA=1T090 s NE X TA:NE X TI 

2800 P0KE4466,21sPRINT"You are lucky to escape the crocodiles 
2810 P0KE4466,23:PRINTTAB(13);"PRESS ANY KEY" 

2820 GETB*sIFB*=""THEN 2820 
2830 PRINT "E" 

2840 BS=RND(1) 

2850 IF B8>0.35 THEND2=D2+1:G0T03480 
2860 REM ** WITCH DOCTOR ROUTINE ** 

2870 C3=INT ( RND(1)*200)s C4=0 
2880 C5= I NT (RND < 1) * 3 > +• 1 
2890 IF C5=1THEN Q*®"Tahata" 

2900 IF C5=2THEN Q$="Mganga" 

2910 IF C5-3THEN Q*="Ubongo" 

2920 PRINTTAB(7);" 

2930 PRINTTAB(7);" ✓-\ 

2940 PRINTTAB <7) ; " .-4 k. 

2950 PRINTTAB(7);" ~! 8 r 

2960 PR I NTTAB (7) ; " V o J 

2970 PR I NTTAB < 7) ; " f ~"\ 

2980 PRINTTAB(7 )i t M 
2990 PRINTTAB (7) ; " U\ I \ \ 

3000 PRINTTAB <7) ; " \'s I I f / 

3010 PR I NTT AB < 7) ; " 

3020 PRINTTAB (7) ; " 

3030 PRINTTAB <7) ; " ,'r-ir-il 
3040 PRINTTAB (7) ; " H® I l©H 
3050 PRINTTAB(7)5" I II I 
3060 PRINTTAB (7) 5 " m 

! 3070 PRINT "-----" 


11 
: 


hi j 
I I 1 



! 


i 


|: ; 

| V 
1 

II 

II f 

11 


V 

11 l 
It I 

,f |: 


f 

a 

il 




#1 
// J mil 
/ i/I I If II 1 

f/M 1 if 

I v f/M 

I I ¥i 1 


3080 P0KE4466,0 
3090 PR I NTTAB (20) ; "US CC 
3100 PRINTTAB(20);"B \ \ 
3110 PRINTTAB(20);"B \ \ 
3120 PRINTTAB(20);"B IV 
3130 PRINTTAB(20)5"B IS 
3140 PRINTTAB(20)s"B I 1 
3150 PRINTTAB(20);"B I 
\ 3160 PRINTTAB(20)5"0 
3170 PRINTTAB(20)s"B 
3180 PRINTTAB (20) ;"S3 
3190 PRINTTAB(20)3"B 
3200 PRINTTAB(20);"B 
I 3210 PRINTTAB(20)5"B 
3220 PRINTTAB(20)s"B 
3230 PRINTTAB(20)s"B 
3240 PRINTTAB(20),»"B 


I 


I 


% \ 


mm 

Ml 

% m\\ l ; 
\'||| | 

Vllto 


VI 


. I 


ill 




ll/|P 

If 1 








\ 


i|| l///fllW 

\| mi m Hint 


it 


v\'! I! 1 I: ■ #i 

K 4 ** ; ij 


3250 POKE 4466,10s PRINTTAB(23);CHR*(104) 

3260 POKE 4466,9s PRINTTAB(25);CHR$(104) 

3270 POKE 4466,10s PRINTTAB(27);CHR$(104) 

3230 POKE 4466,9sPRINTTAB(36);CHR*(104) 

3290 IFC4=2THENP0KE4466,7 s PRINTTAB(21> ;CHR*(103):POkE4466,17 
3300 IFC4=2THENPRINT"!SA new head has been added to the tree. \ 


sFORAwlT099sNEXTf 


S " s FOR .1 •== .1 rtT.nOOs NRX T s PR l NT 00704450 

i 'h / , ji * 


s s \ 





3310 IFC4=2THENPRINTTAB(17)5"SYOUR 
3320 POKE 4466,17 

3330 PRINT "BThe Great and Magical Witch Doctoh* 4 . 

3340 PRINT ;Q$;" has threatened to lay a curse on" 

3350 PRINT "all your company.The porter^ being v4hy^ 

3360 PRINT "superstitious wi fl run away H this" 

3370 PRINT "happens."50$;" demands some heads." 

3380 INPUT "How many do you wish to give ;B9 1 

3390 IF G.B9< 0 THEN PR I NT "EE'You have only ";G; " heads 1 el t, S3" s GOTO 

3400 G=G-B9sIF B9>«C3 THEN PRINT "EBThe Witch Doctor Ihanh< m eu and 
3410 IF B9>~C3 THEN PRINT "Byou good Iuc:K,"s PRIN‘f\^S : 

3420 IF B9>«C3 THEN GETA*sIF A*=""THEN 
3430 IF B9>=C3 THEN 3480 

3440 PRINT "BEOnl y " ; B9; " boxes of beads. Ih*«£ W'j tch" 

3450 PRINT "BDoctor lays a curse and all ybi.tr mcHd 1 
3460 PRINT "Bhave run away." * ^ 

3470 FORA™ 1T03000s NEXTAs C4=2s PRINT"E" : GO 1 0290<5 
3480 IF D2<5 THEN 3590 \ 

3490 REM ** PERFECT WEEK ** _ 

3500 D4= I NT (RND Cl) *200) +10 “ ' ” 

3510 E-E+D4 , ' 

3520 PRINT "EKSWell done. You have made a <toed,HR' 

3530 PRINT "uninterrupted week's march . AJ SO ,,fr 1 a-rxi J m " 

3540 PRINT "natives have boosted your fodd supplyB**^ 

3550 PRINT "by giving you";D4s" pack 
3560 PRINT TAB(13);"BBPRESS ANY KEY" 

3570 GET A*sIF A*®""THEN 3570 
3580 D2=0 s GOTO 3590 ' 

3590 G1 = I NT (D* 100) s C=C-G 1 


\\ I 

yiHiyi 

I 1 f 

«n#^s» r | 

^ ( 1 3) 5 " BSSF-RESS AN V )■■ ^Y 

\ \ % S III 

>7 \ % 

' 41 / L Mm' w/f 

x 


1 


i^V- 






COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 

























































360# G2==II#"(D#2> s 
3 i, L "0 IF Dab THEN 
36 JO T1 C#> THEN 

vr# 1FC :;0'l HENPRJ 
3640 IF C<0 THEN 
r .6» lFE-.t»HENPR] 
3660 IFE ■JOTHENPRJ 
31 Jp IFECfTHENPR] 
36530 IFE<|tHENPR] 
3690 PRINl "EThis 
3700 PRIN# "Banni 
3.|tO PR IN# TAB ( 1 ' 
3720 GET ft*:IF DU 
3730 D2»C#Z = Z + 1:C 
3740 PR IN# "12" 
37.50 REM ** EXPEI 
3760 IF jffcQ THEN 
3770 IF 7. >0 THEN, 
37BO IF 2 >0 THEN 
3790 POKE 4466,3. 
3800 FOP 1=1 TO J 

3810 PRINT" i- xi 

3820 PRINT"I 
3830 -PRINT" 1 .—-I 




i 82= II# < D*2 >: Ep-G2 

IF d#} THEN PRINT "jjYou haven't enough annas to pay theS" 

IF CKO THEN RSINT "porters.They have left you without anyS" 

1FC OIHLNPRJNfffood* to die in the jungle.":F0RI=1T04000:NEXT:PRINT"E" 

IF CKO THEN 4.&0 4 

; IFE<(JTHENPRIl#|f BYou j|haven 7 1 enough food packs to give" 

IFE .07HENF'RIN'jf"Bthe$]1 porters to eat. They have murdered" 

IFE<HJI lENF'RI Njf" Byoulf f or leaving them in the jungle to" 

I.FE<$#HENPRIN j "Bdi el " : FOR I = 1T04000: NEXT: PR I NT "E" : G0T04450 
PRINf "EThis feek you paid your porters";Gl 
PRIN# "Bannasi and they at.e";G2;" food packs." 

PRINf TAB<13>|"BBPRpISS ANY KEY" 

GET ft*: IF B*-#"THEN-3720 
D2=C||2=Z + l:GcfrO 37^fe 
PRI Ip "E" 

REM EXPEDITION fONDITION ** 

INI fBAt the beginning of your expedition youB have:- 
RINT f'BThe state of your expedition after"; Z 
R1NT )r E!weeks is:--" 


ill 

3850, 

"POKE 

4466,4 

PRINT "E" 

; D; " 

PORTERS" 


3060 

? POKE 

4466,7 

| PRINT "S" 

;E; " 

FOOD PACKS" 

1# 

3870 

POKE 

4466, i 

0: PRINT"E" 

;F; " 

BOXES OF MEDICINE" 


3880 

POKE 

4466,| 

13: PRINT"S" 

; G; " 

BOXES OF BEADS" 


3890. 

POKE 

4466, j 

ft: PRINT"B" 

; H; " 

GUNS(RIFLES) " 

3900 

POKE 

4466, | 

9:PRINT"E" 

; K ; " 

BOXES OF AMMUNITION 

| 

3910 

, POKE 

4466,| 

fe : PR I NT'.'B" 

; C; " 

ANNAS REMAINING" 


392# P0KE 4466, i|2: PRINT TAB (26> ; "PRESS ANY KEY" 

393<1 GETB*: IFB*#' "THEN 3930 

3940 REM ** DETAILED MAP OF AFRICA ** 


/I 

39501 

iF'RINT 

• "E" 

| 

. 4# 

3960 ' 

If or j 

= 1 TO 

150 

/:! 

3970 

3980 

ISET V(J) ,W 

'Next 

*) 

1 

3990 

DATA 

63, 0, 

62, 1,61,1,61,2,5< 


4000 

DATA 

12, 5, 

14,5, 11,6, 13,6,5: 

4010 

DATA 

20,9, 

dU 9,22,9,24,9,21 

4020 

Data 

10, 25 

,4 0,26,10,54,10, 


4030 

Data 

52, 12 

,.16, 13,26, 13,52, : 

i 

4040 

Data 

18, 15 

,24,15,25,15,49, 


4050 

Data 

23, 17 

; 48,17,17,18,19,: 


4060 (DATA 

21,19 

123,19,48,19,22,! 


4070. 

data 

7,24, 

»0,24,43,24,8,25, 


4080 

) DATA 

11,27 

i 44,27,9,28, 11,21 

4090 ( 

DATA 

13,30 

J|3,30,10,31,12,: 


4100 

DATA 

45,32 

| 10, 33, 12,3.3,46,: 


4110 

DATA 

45,35 

,12,36,13,36,16,: 


4 120 

DATA 

13,43 

,16,43,14,44,16,- 


4130 

DATA 

45, 38 

4 14,39,16,39,45,: 

: 

4140 

DATA 

47,42 

\ 47,43,47,44,48, ■ 

k 

4150 

POKE 

4466, 

Hi PRINT TAB (7); 

f 

4160 

POKE 

4466, 

If:PRINT TAB(23) 

| 

4170 

POKE 

4466, 

jj>: PRINT TAB (26) 


60,3,14,3,13,4,15,4,59,4,58,5 
12,7,13,7,57,7,23,8,55,8,56,8 
5,9,55,9,24,8,18,10,19 

19,11,25,11,27, 11,53,11,18,12,17,12,25,12 

13,17,14,25,14,50,14,51,14 

15,17,16,23,16,24,16,49,16,18,17 

18,20,18,24,18,47,18,19,19,9,22 

20,46,20,47,20,46,21,46,22,8,23,10,23,45,23 

,10,25,44,25,8,26,11,26,44,26,9,27 


33,10,34,13,34,14,34,46,34,11,35,15,35 

36,15,46,45,36,14,37,16,37,44,37,13,38, 16,38 

44.14.45.16.45.13.42 

39.14.40.17.40.46.40.14.41.18.41.47.41.17.42 


" Indian Ocean" 

4180 P0KE4466,si! 

4190 PRINT TAB(jXL> ? "as" 

4200 PRINT TAB <pl > ; " f'-" 

4210 PRINT TAB (29) ; "m I 
4220 PRINT TAB(±6); 

4230 POKE 4466,4:PRINT TAB(13);' 

4240 POKE 4466,16:PRINT TAB(7); 1 
4250 P0KE4466, 17: PRINTTAB(25);CHR*<99>;"-Your Position" 

4260 F0RI=1TQ300:NEXT 

4270 IF Z=0THENP0KEA7,202:MUSIC"DO - " 

4280 IFZ=1THENFORI=(A7-3)T0A8STEP-1:POKE 1,202:MUSIC"DO"":F0RA=1TO120:NEXTA 
*4290 IFZ=1 THEN POKE 1,0: NEXT I: POKE AS, 202 

4300 IFZ=2THENF0RI=A8 T 0A9STEP-1:POKE 1,202:MUSIC"DO"":FORA=1TO120:NEXTA 
4310 IF Z=2 THEN POKE I,0:NEXTI:PQKEA9,202 

4320 IFZ =3THENF0RI=A9T0B0STEP—1:POKEI,202:MUSIC"DO"":F0RA=1T0120:NEXTA 
4330 IF Z=3 THEN POKE I,0:NEXTI:PQKEBO,202 

4340 IFZ=4THENF0RI=B0T0B1STEP-1:POKE1,202:MUSIC"DO"":F0RA=1TO120:NEXTA 


L.Victoria" 

L.Tanganyika" 



52 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 


















4350 
4360 
4370 
4380 
4390 
4400 
4410 
4420 

4430 IFZ=6 THEN 4980 


IF Z=4THEN POKEI,Os NEXTI:POKE B1,202 
IFZ=5THENF0RI=B1T0B2STEP-40:POKE1,202 : MUSIC"DO - 
IF Z=5THENP0KEI,0:NEXTI:P0KEB2-1,202:MUSIC"D0~ 

IF Z=5THENP0KEB2-1,0sMUS1C"DO" ":P0KEB2-2,202 
IFZ=6THENF0RI=(B2-2)T0B3STEP-1:POKEI,202:,f1USIC"D0 
IF Z=6THENP0KEI,0:NEXTI:P0KEB3,202 
POKE 4466, 22: PRINT TAB(26);"PRESS ANY KEY!' 

GET B*:IF B*=""THEN 4420 . | 


":FQRA=1T0120:NEXTA 
:FORA=1TO120:NE X TA 


:FORA=1 TO120:NE X TA 


4440 

RESTORE:GOTO125C 

) 



i 


1 / * 

4450 

PRINT"EEBE=8 18 


8888 

:8 

# 

8 mmm 

• 

4460 

PRINT 11 EEEEi8 i8 

•i8 

m 

18 

m . 


$ 

4470 

PRINT"SEES 

!8 

18 

18 i 

^ I 

!8 18 ; \ 

W 

4480 

PR I NT" BBSS 18 

•8 

8ji 

i8 / 

:8 ! 

1 

181888 

4490 

PRINT"EEEE ;8 

18 

18 

18 f 

* 1 

;8 "‘8*. i 

:m 

4500 

PRINT"SEES m 

:88 

8888 

• •• ■{■*■■■' , 

|\ 18 





HJ* WX KM Cil *«» «u 


•4510 PRINT 
4520 PRINT 
4530 PRINT- 
4540 PRINT- 
4550 PRINT- 
4560 PRINT 
4570 PRINT- 
4580 PRINT 

4590 pr i nt " mmm 

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4610 PRINT "BIS": 

4620 PR I NT "gSM 
4630 PR I NT" 18 
4640 PR I NT "18 
4650 FOR A=1 TO 
4660 PRINT "12" 

4670 POKE 4466,10 
4680 PRINT "EEEDO YOU WANT- 
4690 GET B$: IF B*=""TW£RT 
4700 IF B*="Y" THEN RfESTI 
4710 1FB*="N"THENPRINT 
4720 GOTO 4690 

4730 PRINT"E":IF S=1 THEN A* 
4740 IF S=2 THEN A*=" ammunit 
4750 PR I NT " S3 BBS! SB BE You have n 
4760 PRINT"Shave killed you 
4770 F0RA=1T03000:NEXT:PRIN' 
4780 PRINT TAB(5);"FUNDS R 
4790 C*=STR*(C >:PR TNT:FORA 
4800 PRINT TAB(21 + A >\"B~":NEX 
4810 RETURN 

4820 POKE 4466,8:PRINT 
4830 POKE 4466,9:PRINT" 

4840 CO* 11 
4850 POKE 4466, C'i 
4860 PRINTTAB<B8) 

4870 PRINTTAB(B8> 

4880 PR INTTAB (B8) ; Y< 

4890 IF C0=16 THEN 
4900 CO=CO+1:FORI= 

4910 Cl=22 
4920 P0KE4466,16 
4930 PRINTTAB(Cl);U$ 

4940 PRINTTAB(C1>;V* 

4950 PRINTTAB(Cl);W$ 

4960 IFC1=OTHENFORI=1TO 
4970 C1=C1-1:MUSIC "EO 
4980 PRINT "E":Gl 
4990 FOR T1=1T018 
5000 PRINTTAB(S> 

5010 PRINTTAB(S) 

5020 PRINTTAB(S) 

5030 PRINTTAB(S) 

5040 PRINTTAB(S) 

5050 PRINTTAB(S) 

5060 PRINTTAB(S) 

5070 PRINTTAB(S) 

5030 PRINTTAB(S) 

5090 PRINTTAB(S) 

5100 PRINTTAB(S) 

5110 PRINTTAB(S) 

5120 PRINTTAB(S) 

5130 PRINTTAB(S) 

5140 PRINTTAB(S) 

5150 NEXT T1 
5160 GOSUB 5270 
5170 POKE 4466,19:PRIN 
5180 F0RI = 1TG3500:N|EXT 
5190 PRINT"E":POKE 
5200 PRINT"Congratul 
5210 PRINT"Bob j ective. 

5220 PRINTTAB < 26 >;-- 

5230 PRINT"Morton Stanley." 
5240 GOTO 4660 \ 

5250 P0KE4466,17:PRI 
5260 RETURN 


5270 

5280 

5290 

5300 

5310 

5320 

5330 

5340 

5350 

5360 

5370 

5380 

5390 


P0KE4466,6 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PR INI- 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
PRINT 
RETURN 




































































The Terran enemy is keeping your planet under 
constant observation but the drone supply ships 
must get through. 

Ten drone ships have to be landed in secret on 
the planet's surface, but because of the Terran 
threat the landing site is constantly moving. 

You must land as many of your robot fleet as 
possible on the planet, using a radio control guid¬ 
ance system. Don't forget that you are operating 


the descending drone and not the moving base. 

A choice of descent speeds ranges from hard to 
easy (1-3) and when you finish you receive a score 
and an assessment of your performance. The game 
runs quicker than most Sinclair ZX81 programs as 
the main part of the game is tightly packed from 
line 180. 

Be prepared for some criticism if your drones 
crash on the planet's surface instead of the base. 



























2 LET P=0 

3 LE! Q=@ 

6 PRINT "DO VOU WANT INSTRUCTIONS 

7 IF INKEV$-"" THEN GOTO 7 
S IF INKEY**"V" THEN GOSUE 2800 
9 CL 3 

18 LET B=<RNB>.5>-CRND<.5) 

15 IF B=8 THEN GOTO 18 
20 LET A = INT <RND*23>+2 

25 LET E=0 

48 LET 3=0 

50 LET T=INT <RNB*28> 

58 PRINT AT 3,5; “INPUT DIFFICULTY. " 


78 PRINT Pi 18, 
88 PRINT AT 11, 
98 PRINT AT 12, 


1=HARD" 
2=MEDIUM" 
3=EASV" 


THEN GOTO H-SO 
THEN LET 1=8.25 
THEN LET 1=8.5 
THEN LET 1=1 


100 IF Q>8 THEN PRINT PT 14,0; 
118 IF INKEV$=" 11 THEN GOTO 110 
120 IF INKEV$="8 
130 IF INKEVT=“1 
148 IF INKEV$="2 
158 IF INKEV$="3 
160 PAST 
178 CLS 

188 FOR U=1 TO 50 
190 LET U1 = INT < RND*31> 

208 LET U2=INT <RND*17> 

218 PRINT AT U2,U1,"." 

228 NEXT U 


'IF VOU WANT YOUR SCORE AND RATING THEN F'RE 
































f 


f COMPUTER PLUS>| 

WATFORD 


A smart new computer store with a very wide range of pro¬ 
ducts. Staff experienced in computers and in business 
systems are available to discuss your requirements — for a 
stock-control system, a word-processor, a file-retrieval 
system, a home computer — or just a book. Among the 
systems on display: 

COMMODORE — as full commercial systems dealers for 
CBM, we handle the 4000 and 8000 
series machines — with a vast range of 
business, scientific & engineering soft¬ 
ware. We have the VIC-20, too. 

SHARP — MZ-80K (at a special low price) and the 

super new MZ-80B, with CP/M, high res. 
graphics, etc. The PCI 211 pocket com¬ 
puter is also in stock. 

COMMODORE — the amazing Atom — over 20,000 instal¬ 
led — the ideal first computer for the 
home. Ring to hear about our low prices. 

TEXAS — the new TI-99/4A home computer, faster, 

new keyboard, 16 colours, 5 octaves 
music, over 400 software modules. 

We also have a wide range of software, computer books and 
supplies. We’re situated in the Queen’s Road, opposite 
Trewins department store — and we’re near the car-parks! 

COMPUTER PLUS 

47 Queens Rd., Watford, Herts WD1 2LH 
Telephone 0923 33927 

—- 


ACORN 

ATOM 

SPECIAL OFFERS 


ATM 1 

Atom ass. 2Kram 8Krom 

172.50 

ATM 2 

Atom ass. 12Kram 8Krom 

197.00 

ATM 10 

Atom Kit 2Kram 8Krom 

138.00 

ATM 11 

Atom Kit 12Kram 8Krom 

162.50 

ATM 22 

Atom 4k Floating Point 

23.00 

ATM 23 

Atom 6522 (ports & elk) 

10.35 

ATM 24 

Atom LS244 Printer Buff 

2.88 

ATM 25 

Atom Colour Encoder 

21.85 

ATM 26 

Atom Mains Power Supply 

10.01 

Prices inclusive of postage and VAT charges 


ELECTRONIQUIP 

128 West Street, Portchester, 
Hants., P016 9XE 

Tel: 0705-373455 



56 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 

























































READY. / 


360 PRINT AT 20,A;"SPACE (3*(SHIFT G>(SHIFT V)SPACE" 
310 PRINT AT 20,0J" 

320 LET 3=8+1 

330 IF 3=20 THEN GOTO 350 

340 GOTO 250 

350 IF T=A+2 THEN GOTO 380 

360 PRINT AT 5,5;"YOU HAVE CRASHED" 

378 GOTO 400 


380 PRINT AT 5,7;"SAFE LANDING" 


390 LET F-P+l 
400 LET Q=Q+i 
410 IF Q=10 THEN GOTO 450 
420 PRINT AT S,T,"<“>” 

425 PAUSE 200 
430 CLS 
440 GOTO 20 
450 CLS 

460 PRINT "VOU 
470 LET W=(FVW10 

480 IF W=10 THEN LET D*="SUPREME COMMANDER OF 

IF N>7 AND W<10 THEN LET D$="SUPREME AIR FLEhT COMMANDER" 

500 IF W>5 AND W<8 THEN LET D$="F'ROFFESSIONAL AIRCRAFT LANDER" 

X0 IF W>3 AND W<6 THEN LET D*="AMATEUR AIRCRAFT LANDER" _ 

K£0 IF W>1 AND W<4 THEN LET D$="I AM GLAD THIS IS ONLY A COMPUTER .SIMULhTION” 
530 .IF W<2 THEN LET D$="DANGEROUS 'UNCOORDIHATED IDIOT" 
jffTlF »1 AND W<4 THEN GOTO PRINTED 


SAFELY-TIMES CUT OF 

THE WORLD 


PILOTS ASSOCIAT ION" 


540 IF W>1 AND W<4 THEN GOTO560 
/550 RRJNI > "V0UR RATING IS -",Df 


560 PRINT AT 8,6;"ANOTHER GO?" 
570 IFI-TNKEV *=" "THEN570 


58fRU 


585 1 

590 PRINT AT 1,8^"COSMOS LANDING"' 

610 PRINT AT 3,0; "VOU ARE IN CHARGE OF THE STARSHIP ASTRuN".; 

All PRINT"VOU HAVE JUST SUCCESSFULLY- COMPLETED VOUR MISSION IN THE UUTER 
:, RINT"LIMITS THE GALAKV" 

PRINT 
10 PRINT 


850 PRINT" 


660 PRINT"TO OPERATE 


665 PRINT" LEFT AND Q FOR SIGHT" 


VOURSELF VOU MUST LAND VOUR 
TLV MOVING LANDING" 

jfc’ if ' 

0 SIGNAL PRESS 1 FOR" 


670 PRINT" THERE ARE THREE DIFFERENT LANDING SPEEDS" 
680 PRINT" DEPENDING ON HOW SKILLED VOU ARE” 


690 PR I NT" VOU HAVE TEN DRONES TO LAND" y 


710 PAUSE 40000/f\ 

URN.... Z ? v 


230 PRINT AT 21,0;"31+GRAPHICS 
240 SLOW 

250 LET E=(A=2>-(A=25>+B*(A>2 
260 LET A=A+B 
270 LET T=T+(INKEVf="0">-(INKEVT 
280 LET T=T+(T=0 >-(T=28) 

290 PRINT AT S,T; "<T>" 


HIFT 


AND 



















I 

I 




Mill 


We live in an era of living room 
economists, expounding their 
views on what s going wrong 
with the country and how they 
would put it right. 

Bad King John is a game which 
will give you a chance to put 
your economic theories to the 
test on a computer model of a 
simple agricultural society. 

Bad King John is the medieval 
lord of a small island with a 
population of just a few 
thousand. To win the trust of the 
people he must stay on the 
throne for 10 years. 

The task is made more compli¬ 
cated by the need to keep the 
population under 3,500 for this 
period, for rebellion is in the air 
and if the population rises above 
this figure the peasants will 
revolt and overthrow you. 

But weighed against this, you 
must remember that should more 
than 30% starve the remaining 
populace will revolt and bring 
the monarchy <lown. 

So keep a careful eye on the 
harvest and the livestock which 
are prone to rot and plague 
respectively. 

The variables are: Y = years 
on throne: TT and TS = date; P = 
population; C = corn; L = live¬ 
stock; S = corn to sow; F = tons 
of corn to feed people; FL = tons 
of corn to feed livestock; SL = 
livestock to slaughter; NP = 
compare with P; H = harvest 
corn; I = looping. 

58 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 


mm 












































RUNS ON A 32 Column Pet in 8K 


By JOHN MYATT 


2 IT : = I NT RNB < 1 > *398+. 5 > 

3 73=1088 

4 P=1388'3=139 : L=59 

3 PRINT" m NSTUCTIONS<'AN)" 

5 GETfiT : IFfi*=""7HEN6 

7 I Fn$= "V"7HEN003UB5888 
29 FRINT’RTTHE TERR IS”; 1TS+TT) 

22 P=IN7<P) 

23 L=INTCLS 

24 2=INTO!:) 

38 PR I NT ” SFOPULfiT I OH • "; P 

35 PR I NT " ML I RESTOCK • "; L 

43 PR I NT !! mom CORN • "; C : PR I NT" S3" 

41 FOR I = 1 TO (FV 19 X- PR I NT " *": KENT 

42 PRINT"*" PRINT"!" 

43 FOR I = 1 TO < L,' 18 > ■ PR I NT" n"■ NEXT 
45 PRINT” rr" 'PRINT"!" 

4 b F uR i = 1T u ! 1 U/1 0 ) 

47 PRINT"#".: 

48 NEXT 

54 PRINT"!" 

35 INPUT "SJTOHS CORN TO SOW".: 3 
,48 8=0-3 

78 INPUT"!TONS TO FEED";F 
38 C=C-F 

35 INPUT "SITONS TO FEED LIVESTOCK"; FL 
38 C=C-FL 
35 IFC3-1THEN185 

188 PRINT"!VOU HfiVEN " T GOT THfiT MUCH!"■G0T054 

182 U=C+F+FL+S : uUT055 

195 INFU7"M_IVESTOCK TO SLRGHTER";SL 

187 L=L-SL 

115 NF-P 

117 IFF 08THENF-i8 

128 P=P# <F/(P*. 1)) * <RNB (1) +. 5) +1 SL* 10 > 

125 IFC>1888THENC=C-788 

126 IFLC=8THENL=13 

127 L=L* < FL/ < L*. 1) ) * <RNB (1) +. 3 > 

138 H=S*RNBC1 )*78 

135 I FH<:STHENH=S*2 
137 H=INT(H) 

148 PR I NT" FUfiRVEST •' " H;" TONS" 



141 IFH=(S*2)0RH<S 

142 I FH>3* 1@fiNBHCS 


*18fiNBNQ7H08RNBS08THENPR INT " m EfiB VEfiR!!!" 
*48THENPRINT"SfiH RVERfiOE VEfiR!" 


143 IFH>S*40THENPR I NT " MR GOOB VEfiR!!" 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 59 












TRS 80-GENIE SOFTWARE 


from the professionals 


Defend! 




First there was Invaders, then came Asteroids, and now DEFEND!!! 

Carrying on in the same tradition, Defend is a fast arcade type action game, complete with sound effects. Enemy 
spaceships come at you fast and furiously. If you succeed in shooting them down before they get your ships, you 
must still get yourself through a meteor shower (but at least they don’t shoot at you) and finally, if you emerge 
unscathed, you must navigate a tunnel in order to get yourself completely out of danger. An enthralling game with 
excellent graphics, personalisation of highest scores and points bonuses. One of its best features is the “crisp” 
and immediate control the player has over the manoeuvreability of his ship which includes diagonal movement. 
Machine language, of course, for speed. A matter of taste, but we think it beats Invaders and Asteroids. Suitable 
for TRS-80 Models I and 111 and all Genie models. 

Tape (16K).£13.00 + V.A.T. = £14.95 

Disk.£16.00 + V.A.T. = £18.40 


m 


Aj K 



MOUMERX LTD 

A J HARDING (MOUMERX) 

1 BUCKHURST ROAD, TOWN HALL SQUARE, BEXHILL-ON-SEA, EAST SUSSEX. 





s 


TEL: [0424] 220391/223636 TELEX 86736 SOTEX G 

TRS-80 & VIDEO GENIE SOFTWARE CATALOGUE £1.00 [refundable] plus £1 postage. I"*"-**— 


60 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 








































144 IF S=0THEHF’R I NT " V GIJ SOW NOTHING; VOU GET NOTHING" 

145 IFC>1800THENPRINT "WOT HITS CORN;LOSE 798T0NS!! 38" :C=C~788 

146 IFL>1000THENPRINT" iPLflGUE!LOSE70O ANIMfiLS!38":L=L-780 

147 IFH>4800RS=6THEN159 
143 FORI=lTOH 

149 PRINT"# I"; ; ; 

155 NEXT 

159 C-C+H 

160 GETVf:IFV$=""THEN169 

178 I FF'O < NP*. 65 > THENF'R I NT " r33THE FEASANTS ARE REVOLT I NO! ! *" : G0T0288 
175 IFP73500 THENPRI NT " SSt'QU HAVE BEEN OVERTHROWN I I S" : 8OTO209 • 

178 IFV>9THENPRINT"E!2LONG LIVE THE KING!!" : GCTO280 

150 NP=P 
185 TT=TT+1 

189 V=V+1 

190 GOTO20 


280 PRINT"iPOPULATION IS"JP 
285 PRINT"MLIVESTOCK : "; L 
210 PRINT" iTTONS CORN";C:PRINT"38" 
228 FORI=1 TO (P/18) 

238 PR I NT" 4*"; l. 

248 NEXT v » 

258 PR I NT "381" : IFL=0THEN255 

251 FORI = 1TO(L/18 > 

252 PRINT "it" ; 

253 NEXT 

254 PR I NT " it PR I NT "381" 

255 FORI=1TO(CV10) 

268 PRINT"#"; 

NEXT 
PRINT"#" 

PRINT" MMANOTHER GO?" 

GETZ* :IF«$=""THEN288 
IFS $<> ” N T ANI3S*0 " V " THEN288 
IF S$= "V"THENRUN 


■=-1 


•0 
271 

d I 3 
288 
285 
290 
300 
5800 


5010 
5028 
5038 
5840 
5058 
5860 
5078 
5880 
0085 
5898 
6880 
6818 
6820 
6838 
5840 
5858 
5860 
&01’ u 
5080 
6000 


END 
PRINT" 

PR I NT "38* 
PRINT "ill 


rWipBAD KING JOHNS" 

1©PEOPLE;ff=1©ANIMALS;#=18T0N3 OF CORN" 
TON OF CORN FEEDS 18 PEOPLE" 

PRINT "ill TON OF CORN FEEDS 10 AN I MfiLS" 

PR I NT "385 TONS OF CORN SHOULD MAKE 158 TONS" 
PRIMT"iWFTER HARVEST PRESS fi KEY" 

PRINT"38RT THE START VOU HAVE SO ANIMALS," 

PR I NT "ill 30 TONS OF CORN fiNB fi POPULATION OF" 

PR I NT "ill 000. VOU CRN SLAGHTER fiN I MfiLS, 1=10 TONS" 
PRINT"i»F CORN." 

PR I NT " iWiiiiiiMSF’RESS KEV " 

GETVV* =IFVVf=""THEN509© 

PRINT'TIWVOU CAN LOSE IN TWO WfiVS- " 

PR I NT " 3838< 13) IF VOU STARVE 38% OF THE" 
PRINT"iPOPULfiTION (OR MORE)" 

PRINT"ilel(2) IF THE POPULATION GROWS ABOVE 3508" 
PRINT"iMrO WIN VOU MUST STfiV ON THE THRONE FOR" 
PR I NT" ill 8 YEARS2 i _ 

PR I NT "38 GOOD LUCK!" 

PRINT"»sW»»*i»PRESS KEYS" » I , / 

GETVVVT:IFVVY*=""THEN6080 
RETURN 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 61 






So far we have seen how to cre¬ 
ate a network, fill it with objects, 
and decode the player's 
response. Movement was by typ¬ 
ing "N" for "GO NORTH" etc. 
Now we will progress so that we 
can use a two word response. 

The first problem is that the 
main, if not only 'moving' verb is 
"GO", length 2. Our standard 
sub-string length is to be 3. This 
can be padded out, so: 

IF LEN (R2$) = 2 THEN LET R2$ 
= R2$ 4- " " 

and must be done before R4$ is 
set or an error will result. 

How can verbs be categor¬ 
ised? "GO" will change a loca¬ 
tion, "TAKE" or "DROP" will 
change the inventory and loca¬ 
tion number of an object, whilst 
other verbs may have varying 
and less standard effects. There¬ 
fore, for the purposes of Adven¬ 
ture programming, verbs can be 
placed into one of three 
categories: Moving verbs; Pos¬ 
session verbs; Others. 

Of these (moving verbs) is fun¬ 
damentally different in that the 
word following, will be a direc¬ 
tion and not necessarily a noun. 
To speed up the string searches 
it will pay to have a separate 
direction string from the noun 
string and only search the direc¬ 
tions if a moving verb is 
detected. So: 

LET W3$ = "NORSOUEAS- 
WESCOT" 


Variable Description 


Name 

R1$ 

Input string 

R2$ 

1st word input 

R3$ 

2nd word input 

R4$ 

1st 3 letters of E2$ 

R5$ 

ditto R3$ 

1 

counter 

LN 

current location no. 

K1 

No. of current 

K2 

valid R2$ 

No. of current 

J 

valid R3$ 

No. of found word 

C$ 

in search 
temp variable for 

CCS 

string to be searched 
temp variable for 

W1$ 

element being sought 
Verb string 

W2$ 

Noun string 

W3$ 

Direction string 

W4$ 

Direction code string 

os$ 

Seen objects for 

0${n) 

screen display 

Object description 

P(n) 

Object location 

L$(m) 

Location description 


Value in the 
Example 
(where relevant) 

GO COTTAGE 
GO 

COTTAGE 

COT- 

GOT 


GO TAKDRO 
NORSOUEASWESCOT 


Exits from location 
D$(m) Destinations 

Search subroutine returns J — 13 for COTTAGE 
K2 - (((J — 1) /3) + 1) = 5 and code - MID$ 
(W4$,K2,1) 

FIGURE t. List of variable names used so far and 
their uses in example described. 

0 Cottage 1 Lane Fig. 2: Simplified net- 

id Knife) work of locations show¬ 

ing initial positions 
2 Forest 3 Meadow of objects in brackets. 
(3 Axe) (2 Cow) Note: objects and loca¬ 

tions independently 
N T 4 Lake numbered. 

1 (1 Fish) 


may occur. Exit strings read: 

LET E$)l) = "XS" : LET E$(2) = 
"XE" 

Next establish a direction code 
string that aligns arithmetically 
with the direction string W3$: 
LET W4$ = "NSEWX" 

With these strings together 
with the string search subroutine 
previously explained, it all fits 
together as shown below. 


Referring to the simple net¬ 
work in Figure 2, we previously 
entered the cottage from, the 
forest by typing "N" which was 
found in exit string E$(2) = "NE", 
i.e. using a compass bearing. It 
would provide variety and add 
elegance to be able to reply "GO 
COTTAGE" (even if not fantastic 
English). The player would have 
to be supplied information or a 
clue to the existance of such a 
cottage, either in the location 
descriptions L$(l) and L$(2) or by 
a "help" clue. 

"COTTAGE" must now be 
assigned a direction code: north 
= N south = S cottage = X 

I have used X for the cottage 
rather than C to demonstrate 
flexibility, since more than one 
exit with the same first letter 


"Go" verb logic 

\ 

Moving verb? 
| Yes 


No 


Search noun 
string 


Search direction 
string 


Valid 

direction? 


No 


| Yes 


Find direction 
code from value 
returned in search 


Set 

standard reply 
"I can't go there' 1 


Valid for this 
location? 


| Yes 


Find corresponding 
destination and set 
current location No. 
to new one. 


No^X 

\ 


Set standard 


reply 


"OK” 


WHAT'S IN A 
PYRAMID 

What's in a pyramid? Quite a lot if 
you compare Scott Adams' Pyramid 
of Doom with the Tandy version of 
Adventure Pyramid. 

The former follows the usual Scott 
Adams split screen format while the 
latter has a continuously scrolling 
display with a rather verbose narra¬ 
tive style. When the player moves to 
a new location a response like "... 
your are standing at the west end of 
a large chamber. A rough stone 
staircase leads up behind you ..." is 
apt to leave him rather confused, 
especially if he has just re-entered 
the chamber from the opposite direc¬ 
tion. Has he turned around, or, is 
there a staircase behind him and in 
front? It was all too much for me 
after a while, but it seems you either 
like it or you don't. My wife sat up 
for hours making maps and notes — 
she even took the bird-statue and 
statue-box in her stride! Some heavy 
typing is required in this game, as — 
unlike most Adventures — nearly all 
instructions must be entered in full. 
("Inventory" seems such a long word 
after a while!) 

Pyramid of Doom has some dif¬ 
ficult parts, but on the whole is easy 
enough to give the novice sufficient 
encouragement to persevere — once 
he has got inside! The player isn't 
left with quite the same feeling of 
lofty galleries and vast chambers 
that "Pyramid" conveys, because the 
display is more "compartmental¬ 
ised". Nevertheless the layout of the 
interior is both credible and interest¬ 
ing. Nervous tension is created by 
the unexpected appearance of a 
small nomad, who proceeds to fol¬ 
low the player around. Is he as 
sinister as he seems? 

There is humour to be found in the 
Throne Room — but don't hang 
around too long! And don't be fooled 
by an apparently incorrect score — 
eliminate the culprit. (Scott Adams 
can count even if he can't spell!) 
Pyramid is published by Tandy 
Machines and runs on the TRS-80 
and Video Genie 

Pyramid of Doom by Scott Adams is 
published by Adventure International 
and runs on the TRS-80, Models I & 
II, Video Genie, Apple and Pet. 


Figure 3 






















ZX 80/81 HARDWARE/SOFTWARE 


ZX KEYBOARD 


A full size keyboard for the 80/81. The 
keyboard has all the 80/81 functions on the 
keys, and will greatly increase your pro¬ 
gramming speed. It is fitted with push type 
keys as in larger computers. 

The keyboard has been specially designed for 
the Sinclair computer and is supplied ready- 
built. It also has facilities for 4 extra buttons 
which could be used for on/off switch, reset, 
etc. £27.95 


4K GRAPHICS ROM 


The dK Graphic module is our latest ZX81 accessory. This module, unlike most other 
accessories fits neatly inside your computer under the keyboard. The module comes ready 
built, fully tested and complete with a 4K graphic ROM. This will give you 448 extra 
pre-programmed graphics, your normal graphic set contains 64. This means that you now 
have 512 graphics and with there inverse 1024. This now turns the 81 into a very powerful 
computer, with a graphic set rarely found on larger more expensive machines. In the ROM 
are lower case letters, bombs, bullets, rockets, tanks, a complete set of invaders graphics 
and that only accounts for about 50 of them, there are still about 400 left (that may give you 
an idea as to the scope of the new ROM). However, the module does not finish there; it 
also has a spare holder on the board which will accept a further 4K of ROM/RAM. IT NEEDS 
NO EXTRA POWER AND WORKS FROM YOUR NORMAL POWER SUPPLY. £27.95 


RAM 80/81 


16K RAM 

Massive add-on memory for 80/81. 

16K KIT-A-KIT VERSION 

of a 16K Ram. Full instructions included. All memory expansions plug into the user port at 
the rear of the computer. 16K RAM £42.95 16K KIT £32.95 
2K & 4K RAM 

Static Ram memory expansion for the 80/81. They both work with onboard Ram i.e. 4K plus 
onboard = 5K. This is the cheapest small memory expansion available anywhere. 2K RAM 

£15.95. 4K RAM £22.95 


16K 81 SOFTWARE 


As seen at the ZX Microfair. 

DEFLEX This totally new and very addictive game, which was highly acclaimed at the 
Microfair, uses fast moving graphics to provide a challenge requiring not only quick 
reaction, but also clever thinking. One and two player versions on same cassette. £3.95 
3D/3D LABYRINTH You have all seen 3D Labyrinth games, but this goes one stage beyond; 
you must manoeuvre within a cubic maze and contend with corridors which may go 
left/right/up/down. Full size 3D graphical representation. £3.95. 

CENTIPEDE. This is the first implementation of the popular arcade game on any micro 
anywhere. Never mind your invaders, etc., this is positively shining, the speed at which this 
runs makes ZX invaders look like a game of simple snap. £4.95. 

Please add £1 p&p for all hardware, Software p&p free. Specify ZX80/81 on order. 

ALL OUR PRODUCTS ARE COVERED BY A MONEY BACK GUARANTEE 

m ■ 23 Sussex Road, Gorleston, 

A p ^ m Great Yarmouth, Norfolk. 

■ ll I ■ I ™ Telephone; Yarmouth (0493) 602453 




COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 63 













--—--- ' I ing, bending up the wire and 


HT FOR FILE 13 


Over the past couple of weeks a 
number of people have come to 
me with home-built kits which 
should really have been consi¬ 
dered fit for file 13, i.e. the bin. 

These kits are not necessarily 
computers but can be the add¬ 
ons, such as video boards, 
P.I.A.'s, extra memory boards 
and the like which can either be 
supplied by the computer man¬ 
ufacturers or by a separate firm. 
They are often badly designed or 
are so complex that a good deal 
of hard wiring is required. It is 
this exercise that can be the 
downfall of many-a-good compu¬ 
ter constructor. 

The boards that I have seen 
have been coated with a solder 
mask to prevent shorts on the 


circuit. This, unfortunately, can 
be counter-productive as it is dif¬ 
ficult to see whether or not there 
are any open-circuit tracks 
around the pads. On the other 
hand it does help considerably 
the heavy-handed constructor 
who is liable to splash solder 
about the place. 

When making hard-wired 
links on the board I prefer to use 
single core, P.V.C, insulated con¬ 
ductor as this can be easily 
straightened and can be bent at 
right-angles, unlike the multi- 
stranded types. I use 1/0.7mm 
gauge. I also make use of as 
many colours as possible and 
take note of where I have used 
them. This helps tremendously 
in tracing out the circuit later on. 

By measuring the hole spac- 


then stripping you can ensure, 
as with resistors, that the com¬ 
ponent fits neatly in. Be very 
careful that you do not crimp the 
wire too much or accidentally cut 
it if you are stripping with cut¬ 
ters or a knife. Again, double 
check that the link is good, either 
by a physical test — by trying 
to lift the wire off the board — 
or by a continuity test. 

As a general rule, the neater 
the board appears, the more 
reliable it is. This may be only 
because it requires more care 
and attention to produce one. 
Wires which meander about the 
board are unsightly and are 
prone to physical stresses and 
strains, whereas a connection 
made tight on the top of the 
board looks good and is difficult 
to interfere with. 

It must be remembered that 
any links that must be made, 
unless otherwise specified, must 
be made after completed con¬ 
struction. As well as using all of 
the available colours, I try to put 
in the shortest links first, gradu¬ 
ally building up to the longest, 
which on some boards may be 
from one end to the other. Take 
care not to hide any of the shor¬ 
ter leads by laying them all, if 
possible, flat on the board. Not 
only does it look pretty but also it 
is easy to follow. 

If you are not able to use 
single-stranded wire I can sug¬ 
gest a few points that will help to 
ensure similarly good results as 
if you had. When measuring the 
spacing of the holes allow about 
an extra 3 or 4mm after strip¬ 
ping. Tin the twisted strands as 
usual and insert the ends into 
the holes. If the length is not 
quite right strip a little more off 
or start again, depending on 
whether you are long or short. 

The wire should be slightly 
loose in between the holes now. 
When you come to solder the first 
end, hold it still in the hole and 
secure in position. At the other 
end grab the tinned end and, as 
you solder, pull it through gently. 
The insulation should soften and 
fold back against the top of the 
board. The wire should now be 
taut. The procedure in all the 


other aspects of construction are 
the same though. 

When lines, such as those for 
power and external devices and 
control, are required to be taken 
off the board the most profes¬ 
sional way is by an edge connec¬ 
tor. However, many kits do not 
come supplied with these and 
they are sometimes expensive 
options. 

The alternative to soldering 
directly into the board is to put 
single- or double-sided pins in 
the board and solder to these. 
This means that, so long as the 
job has been done neatly 
enough, the wires can be 
removed without moving the 
board if it has been screwed 
down. This, I have found, is the 
most cost-effective of all the 
options. It may also be improved 
by sleeving the connections with 
P.V.C. or silicon. 

Last, but not least, our Febru¬ 
ary gripe goes to a number of 
companies who modify computer 
boards. I must congratulate 
them for such a difficult job well 
done. The boards I have seen 
have mostly been U.K.lOl's but 
there are other conversions on 
the market for other makes. The 
worst one had been modified for 
increased memory for the screen 
in order to attach a high- 
resolution graphics board. 

The bottom of this board 
looked like a plate of Italian 
spaghetti. The wires were very 
light gauge enamelled. By very 
light I mean 35 or 40 gauge. 
Somehow the board did work. 
However, there was no way of 
protecting the bottom of the 
board while in use and eventu¬ 
ally there was one wire which 
came adrift. If only the company 
had sprayed the board with a 
P.C.B. laquer all would have 
been well. 

Despite this setback the 
machine works perfectly now, 
with no problems except those of 
the programmer. He keeps 
forgetting that he now has 4K of 
screen memory so that his 
graphics just take up a quarter of 
t he display! _____ 

BY KEITH MOTT 




















Make the most of your 
Sinclair ZX Computer... 

Sinclair ZX 
software 
on cassette. 

£ 3 .— per cassette. 


The unprecedented popularity of 
the ZX Series of Sinclair Personal 
Computers has generated a large 
volume of programs written by users. 

Sinclair has undertaken to 
publish the most elegant of these 
on pre-recorded cassettes. Each 
program is carefully vetted for 
interest and quality, and then 
grouped with other programs to 
form a single-subject cassette. 

Each cassette costs £3.95 
(including VAT and p&p) and comes 
complete with full instructions. 

Although primarily designed 
for the Sinclair ZX81, many of the 
cassettes are suitable for mnning 
on a Sinclair ZX80 - if fitted with a 
replacement 8K BASIC ROM. 

Some of the more elaborate 
programs can be run only on a 
Sinclair ZX Personal Computer 
augmented by a 16K-byte add-on 
RAM pack. 

This RAM pack and the 
replacement ROM are described 
below. And the description of each 
cassette makes it clear what 
hardware is required. 

8K BASIC ROM 

The 8K BASIC ROM used in the 
ZX81 is available to ZX80 owners 
as a drop-in replacement chip. 

With the exception of animated 
graphics, all the advanced features 
of the ZX81 are now available on a 
ZX80-including the ability to run 
much of the Sinclair ZX Software. 

The ROM chip comes with a 
new keyboard template, which can 
be overlaid on the existing 
keyboard in minutes, and a new 
operating manual. 

16K-BYTE RAM pack 

The 16K-byte RAM pack provides 
16-times more memory in one 
complete module. Compatible with 
the ZX81 and the ZX80, it can be used 
for program storage or as a database. 

The RAM pack simply plugs 
into the existing expansion port on 
the rear of a Sinclair ZX Personal 
Computer. 



Cassette 1-Games 

For ZX81 (and ZX80 with 8K 
BASIC ROM) 

ORBIT -your space craft’s 
mission is to pickup a very valuable 
cargo that’s in orbit around a star. 

SNIPER-you’re surrounded 
by 40 of the enemy. How quickly 
can you spot and shoot them when 
they appear? 

METEORS - your starship is 
cruising through space when you 
meet a meteor storm. How long can 
you dodge the deadly danger? 

LIFE-J.H. Conway’s ‘Game of 
Life’ has achieved tremendous 
popularity in the computing world. 
Study the life, death and evolution 
patterns of cells. 

WOLFPACK-your naval 
destroyer is on a submarine hunt. 
The depth charges are armed, but 
must be fired with precision. 

GOLF-what’s your handicap? 
It’s a tricky course but you control 
the strength of your shots. 

Cassette 2 - Junior 
Education: 7-11-year-olds 

For ZX81 with 16K RAM pack 

CRASH-simple addition-with 
the added attraction of a car crash 
if you get it wrong. 

MULTIPLY - long multi¬ 
plication with five levels of 
difficulty. If the answer’s wrong- 
the solution is explained. 

TRAIN - multiplication tests 
against the computer. The winner’s 
train reaches the station first. 

FRACTIONS - fractions 
explained at three levels of 
difficulty. A ten-question test 
completes the program. 

ADDSUB- addition and 
subtraction with three levels of 
•difficulty. Again, wrong answers 
are followed by an explanation. 

DIVISION-with five levels of 
difficulty. Mistakes are explained 
graphically, and a running score is 
displayed. 

SPELLING-up to 500 words 
over five levels of difficulty. You 
can even change the words yourself. 

Cassette 3-Business and 
Household 

For ZX81 (and ZX80 with 8K 
BASIC ROM) with 16K RAM pack 

TELEPHONE - set up your own 
computerised telephone directory 
and address book. Changes, 
additions and deletions of up to 
50 entries are easy. 

NOTE PAD-a powerful, easy- 
to-run system for storing and 



ORSIT 

Sniper 

Mg'** 


3FTWARE 


retrieving everyday information. 
Use it as a diary, a catalogue, a 
reminder system, or a directory. 

BANK ACCOUNT-a 
sophisticated financial recording 
system with comprehensive 
documentation. Use it at home to 
keep track of‘where the money 
goes,’ and at work for expenses, 
departmental budgets, etc. 

Cassette 4-Games 

For ZX81 (and ZX80 with 8K 
BASIC ROM) and 16K RAM pack 

LUNAR LANDING-bring the 
lunar module down from orbit to a 
soft landing. You control attitude 
and orbital direction - but watch the 
fuel gauge! The screen displays your 
flight status-digitally and graphically. 

TWENTY ONE - a dice version 
of Blackjack. 

COMBAT -you’re on a suicide 
space mission. You have only 12 
missiles but the aliens have 
unlimited strength. Can you take 
12 of them with you? 

SUBSTRIKE-on patrol, your 
frigate detects a pack of 10 enemy 
subs. Can you depth-charge them 
before they torpedo you? 

CODEBREAKER-the 
computer thinks of a 4-digit number 
which you have to guess in up to 10 
tries. The logical approach is best! 

MAYDAY - in answer to a distress 
call, you’ve narrowed down the 
search area to 343 cubic kilometers 
of deep space. Can you find the 
astronaut before his life-support 
system fails in 10 hours time? 


Cassette 5 - Junior 
Education: 9-11-year-olds 

For ZX81 (and ZX80 with 8K 
BASIC ROM) 

MATHS-tests arithmetic with 
three levels of difficulty, and gives 
your score out of 10. 

BALANCE - tests understanding 
of levers/fulcrum theory with a 
series of graphic examples. 

VOLUMES-‘yes’ or‘no’ 
answers from the computer to a 
series of cube volume calculations. 

AVERAGES - what’s the average 
height of your class? The average 
shoe size of your family? The average 
pocket money of your friends? The 
computer plots a bar chart, and 
distinguishes MEAN from MEDIAN. 

BASES - convert from decimal 
(base 10) to other bases of your 
choice in the range 2 to 9. 

TEMP-Volumes, temperatures 
-and their combinations. 

How to order 

Simply use the order form below, 
and either enclose a cheque or give 
us the number of your Access, 
Barclaycard or Trustcard account. 
Please allow 28 days for delivery. 
14-day money-back option. 

sindsir 

ZX SOFTWARE 

Sinclair Research Ltd, 

6 Kings Parade, Cambridge, 
Cambs., CB21SN. Tel: 0276 66104. 


IT : Si 


Sinclair Research, FREEPOST 7, Cambridge, CB21YY 


Pleaseprint 


71 


Please send me the items I have indicated below. 


Qty 

Code 

Item 

Item price 

Total 


21 

Cassette 1 - Games 

£3.95 



22 

Cassette 2-Junior Education 

£3.95 



23 

Cassette 3-Business and Household 

£3.95 



24 

Cassette 4-Games 

£3.95 



25 

Cassette 5-Junior Education 

£3.95 



17 

*8K BASIC ROM for ZX80 

£19.95 



18 

* 16K RAM pack for ZX81 and ZX80 

£49.95 




*Post and packing (if applicable) 

£2.95 


Total £ 



*Please add £2.95 to total order value only if ordering ROM and/or RAM. 

I enclose a cheque/PO to Sinclair Research Ltd for£- 

Please charge my AccessVBarclaycard/Trustcard no. 


*Please delete as applicable. 

Name: Mr/Mrs/Miss I-1-1-I-1-1-1-1-1-1-I-L 

■ Address: I_I_I_I_I_I_[_I_I_I_I_I_I-1-L 



J I I 


icvGoa 


u 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 65 















































the heart of a system 


that grows with you 


1980 saw a genuine breakthrough - 
the Sinclair ZX80, world’s first com¬ 
plete personal computer for under 
£100. Not surprisingly, over 50,000 
were sold. 

In March 1981, the Sinclair lead 
increased dramatically. For just 
£69.95 the Sinclair ZX81 offers even 
more advanced facilities at an even 
lower price. Initially, even we were 
surprised by the demand - over 
50,000 in the first 3 months! 

Today, the Sinclair ZX81 is the 
heart of a computer system. You can 
add 16-times more memory with the 
ZX RAM pack. The ZX Printer offers 
an unbeatable combination of 
performance and price. And the ZX 
Software library is growing every day. 

Lower price: higher capability 

With the ZX81, it’s still very simple to 
teach yourself computing, but the 
ZX81 packs even greater working 
capability than the ZX80. 

It uses the same micro-processor, 
but incorporates a new, more power¬ 
ful 8K BASIC ROM - the ‘trained 
intelligence’ of the computer. This 
chip works in decimals, handles logs 
and trig, allows you to plot graphs, 
and builds up animated displays. 

And the ZX81 incorporates other 
operation refinements - the facility 
to load and save named programs 
on cassette, for example, and to 
drive the new ZX Printer. 


BASIC manual 


New 


Every ZX81 comes with a comprehensive, specially- written 
manual - a complete course in BASIC programming, from 
first principles to complex programs. 


Higher specification, lower price - 
how’s it done? 

Quite simply, by design. The ZX80 
reduced the chips in a working 
computer from 40 or so, to 21. The 
ZX81 reduces the 21 to 4! 

The secret lies in a totally new 
master chip. Designed by Sinclair 
and custom-built in Britain, this 
unique chip replaces 18 chips from 
the ZX80! 

New, improved specification 

• Z80A micro-processor - new 
faster version of the famous Z80 
chip, widely recognised as the best 
ever made. 

• Unique‘one-touch’ keyword 
entry: the ZX81 eliminates a great 
deal of tiresome typing. Key words 
(RUN, LIST, PRINT, etc.) have their 
own single-key entry. 

• Unique syntax-check and report 

codes identify programming errors 
immediately. 

• Full range of mathematical and 
scientific functions accurate to eight 
decimal places. 

• Graph-drawing and animated- 
display facilities. 

• Multi-dimensional string and 
numerical arrays. 

• Up to 26 FOR/NEXT loops. 

• Randomise function - useful for 
games as well as serious applications. 

• Cassette LOAD and SAVE with 
named programs. 

• IK-byte RAM expandable to 16K 
bytes with Sinclair RAM pack. 

• Able to drive the new Sinclair 
printer. 

• Advanced 4-chip design: micro¬ 
processor, ROM, RAM, plus master 
chip - unique, custom-built chip 
replacing 18 ZX80 chips. 


Built: 

£ 69 .** 


Kit or built - it’s up to you! 

You’ll be surprised how easy the 
ZX81 kit is to build: just four chips to 
assemble (plus, of course the other 
discrete components) - a few hours 
work with a fine-tipped soldering iron 
And you may already have a suitable 
mains adaptor - 600 mA at 9 V DC 
nominal unregulated (supplied with 
built version). 

Kit and built versions come com¬ 
plete with all leads to connect to 
your TV (colour or black and white) 
and cassette recorder. 
































Designed as a complete module to 
fit your Sinclair ZX80 or ZX81, the 
RAM pack simply plugs into the 
existing expansion port at the rear 
of the computer to multiply your 
data/program storage by 16! 

Use it for long and complex 
programs or as a personal database. 
Yet it costs as little as half the price 
of competitive additional memory. 

With the RAM pack, you can 
also run some of the more sophisti¬ 
cated ZX Software - the Business & 
Household management systems 
for example. 


How to order your ZX81 

BY PHONE - Access, Barclaycard or 
Trustcard holders can call 
01-200 0200 for personal attention 
24 hours a day, every day. 

BY FREEPOST - use the no-stamp- 
needed coupon below. You can pay 


by cheque, postal order, Access, 
Barclaycard or Trustcard. 

EITHER WAY - please allow up to 
28 days for delivery. And there’s a 
14-day money-back option. We want 
you to be satisfied beyond doubt - 
and we have no doubt that you will be. 


To: Sinclair Research Ltd, FREEPOST 7, Cambridge, CB21YY. 


Item 


Code 


Item price 
£ 


Order 

Total 

£ 


Sinclair ZX81 Personal Computer kit(s). Price includes 

ZX81 BASIC manual, excludes mains adaptor. 


49.95 


Ready-assembled SinclairZX81 Personal Computer(s). 

Price includes ZX81 BASIC manual and mains adaptor. 


69.95 


Mains Adaptors) (600 mA at 9 V DC nominal unregulated). 


8.95 


16K-BYTE RAM pack. 


49.95 


49.95 


19.95 


SinclairZX Printer. 


8K BASIC ROM to fitZX80. 


2.95 


Post and Packing. 


I6K-I»yte RAM 
pack for massive 
add-on memory. 


Avaname now- 
the ZX Printer 
for only £49.- 


Designed exclusively for use with 
the ZX81 (and ZX80 with 8K BASIC 
ROM), the printer offers full alpha- 
numerics and highly sophisticated 
graphics. 

A special feature is COPY, which 
prints out exactly what is on the 
whole TV screen without the need 
for further intructions. 


At last you can have a hard copy 
of your program listings-particularly 
useful when writing or editing 
programs. 

And of course you can print out 
your results for permanent records 
or sending to a friend. 

Printing speed is 50 characters 
per second, with 32 characters per 
line and 9 lines per vertical inch. 

The ZX Printer connects to the rear 
of your computer - using a stackable 
connector so you can plug in a RAM 
pack as well. A roll of paper (65 ft 
long x 4 in wide) is supplied, along 
with full instructions. 



sindaii - 

ZX8I 

6 Kings Parade, Cambridge, Cambs., CB21SN. 
Tel: (0276) 66104 & 21282. 


□ Please tick if you require a VAT receipt TOTAL £ 

*1 enclose a cheque/postal order payable to Sinclair Research Ltd, for £_ 

*Please charge to my Access/Barclaycard/Trustcard account no. 

‘Please delete/complete as applicable. 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 1 1 I I 1 I 

Name: Mr/Mrs/Miss I_I_I_I_ 111111111111 

Address: I_I_I_I_1 I 1 I I 1 1 I 1 I 1 I 1 1 I I 


FREEPOST - no stamp needed. 


Please print. 


CVG02 































BY DAVID ANNAL 


Sound is an important selling 
feature of many of the new gen¬ 
eration of microcomputers but it 
has not always been taken for 
granted. 

Producing sound from a Pet, 
for example, is a simple process 
but many readers will not have 
realised, for example, that the 
Nibblers Pet game in the 
November issue, incorporated 
sound. 

This method of generating 
sound was seen on several of the 
first and second generation 
microcomputers. Computers 
now mostly use dedicated chips 
producing 3 or 4 notes at the 
same time, controlled by spe¬ 
cially invented Basic words such 
as "Music", "Tempo" and the 
like. Examples include the Dai, 
Atari, Sharp, and the new BBC 
computer. Note production is 
simple, eg. to play the note mid¬ 
dle C one might simply enter a 
Basic line — 10 MUSIC C. 

Many computers exist with no 
such refined system and it is 
these to which we direct our 
attention this month. Most, such 
as the Pet, have the necessary 
peripheral interface adaptors 
(PIA), or versatile interface adap¬ 
tors (VIA), built in. If not, they 
can be added quite simply and 
memory addressed. To make 
matters clear, addresses given 
below are those used in the Pet 
but the principle involved is the 
same with any computer. A 
Basic POKE statement puts the 
number after the comma into the 
memory before the comma. 

Information to be turned to 
sound and amplified comes 
down a single wire in the form of 
a series of "l"s and "0"s. The 
waveform and "tone" can be 
altered by the ratio of the 
number of "l"s to "0"s and their 
distribution. The frequency of 
the sound heard is governed by 
the speed of their production. 

A simple way of achieving 
this, and the method employed 
in the Pet, is shown in diagram 
1. The eight bit register is filled 
with a pattern of "0"s and "l"s, in 
the example shown, it would be 


10 REM PROGRAM 1 — SINGLE NOTE 
20 POKE 59467, 16 
90 POKE 59466, 15 
40 POKE 59464, 177 
50 FOR 0=1 TO 1000: NEXT D 
60 POKE 59467, 0 
READY. 

10 REM PROGRAM 2 — ?? 

20 A =59467: B =59466: C =59464: 

N =250 

30 POKE A, 16: POKE B, 37 

40 FOR R =1 TO 8 

50 FOR T =1 TO 200 STEP 3 

60 POKE C, N-T 

70 NEXT T 

80 NEXT R 

90 POKE A, 0 

READY 


Address Function 

59467 Register Mode. 

16MFree running under 
timer control 

59466 Main Shift Register 

59464 Delay No. for timer 

countdown 

the decimal No. 15. A control 
location is set so that the register 
is now shifted one place to the 
right under the influence of a 
timing circuit. 

Each bit on reaching the end of 
the register is returned and 
inserted back at the beginning 
again but it also passes down 
the output line at the same time. 

In simple terms, each "1" rep¬ 
resents a voltage of 5V and each 
"0" a drop to 0V, so in our 
example, the output would be 
high for four shifts and then low 
for four shifts. This pattern is 
repeated as the register goes 
round and round and results in a 
square wave output (figure 2). 

The frequency of sound output 

Diagram 1: Shift register at address 59466 


00001111 


E.g. Set at Dec. 15 


Output port (CB2) 


I 


5V 


OV 


Diagram 2: Result of 16 shifts’ 


III I II M I I I I I I IT 

Time 


is made to vary by introducing a 
time delay before each shift 
takes place. In the case of musi¬ 
cal sounds, the delays are very 
short and are set on the chip 
itself, which counts down from a 
preset number in one of its tim¬ 
ing registers. 

Each time the loop reaches 
zero, the main register is shifted 
by one bit and the process is 
then repeated. We now have 
control of the pitch of the note 
produced by varying this delay 
number. The higher the number, 
the longer the delay in counting 
down, the slower the rate of 
stepping and thus the lower the 
note produced. 

To obtain sound, the output 
line (CB2 from pin M of User Port 
on Pet) is simply connected to an 
amplifer such as that described 
in issue two and an earth return 
made to digital ground (pin N). It 
can be taken direct to your Hi-Fi 
but, in order to protect your com¬ 
puter from any short circuits or 
surges, it is always advisable to 
insert a resistance in series with 
the output line — one of 100K will 
suffice here. 

Program 1 should now be easy 
to follow. First, in line 20, the VIA 
shift register is made free run¬ 
ning under timer control as dis¬ 
cussed above (several options 
exist but this is the most useful). 
Next, the shift register is filled 
with a pattern of "00001111" = 
15dec. Finally the delay loop 
countdown is set at 117 to give a 
note of C. The delay in line 50 is 
a Basic one and governs how 
long the note will sound before it 
is turned off again in line 60. 
Note that the control of the shift 
register is built into the VIA chip 
(in this case a 6522) and so any 
computer can control it — only 
the memory locations allocated 
to the various control registers 
will be different. 

What does Program 2 do? All 
kinds of effects are. possible by 
using Basic to alter the byte in 
the shift register and the delay 
number. 

A flick back to the Nibblers 
game on page 47 of the 
November issue. Note lines 10, 
350, 430, 545 and 690. Their func¬ 
tion should now be crystal clear! 
































FROM THE PUBLISHERS OF THE BEST 
SELLING BOOKS FOR THE SINCLAIR COMES: 




Not Only 

But AIso.t^^' 

PROGRAMS FOR THE %\ 
SINCLAIR ZX81...IK 

Not Only 

..does this book contain over 
30 fully debugged and exciting programs, 
every one of which will fit into the basic IK 
memory of your Sinclair ZX81 — including 
programs such as STAR WARS, LUNAR 
LANDER, BLACKJACK, MINI ADVEN 
TURE, DRAUGHTS, BREAKOUT. 

But Also 

* Detailed explanation of how 
these programs were written. 

* Lots of hints on how 
you can write exciting 
programs for your 
ZX81. 

* Numerous space 
saving techniques — 
obviously invaluable to 
theZX81 owner. 

* PEEKS and POKES 
and all the other 
'complicated' func¬ 
tions are clearly 
explained. 

* MUCH, MUCH 

MORE... 




Understanding 
Vour ZX81 ROM 


Plus special section: How to use machine 
code routines in your BASIC programs, 
by DR. I. LOGAN. 

Dr Logan was the first person to disass¬ 
emble the Sinclair ZX80 Monitor and was 
the co-author of the ZX80 COMPANION. 

In UNDERSTANDING YOUR ZX81 ROM 
Dr. Logan illustrates all the facilities of the 
ZX81 Monitor, how it works and how you 
can use it in your own programs. 
A special section shows you how you can 
squeeze more power into your ZX81, 
by using machine language and machine 
language subroutines. 

An essential book for those who really want 
to understand the full working of the 
SINCLAIR ZX81. 

Published by MELBOURNE HOUSE PUBLISHERS LTD. 
Send Stamped, self-addressed envelope for FREE catalogue. 


£S>95l! 


THE ESSENTIAL SOFTWARE COMPANY (Visconti Ltd) 

47 Brunswick Centre, London W1CN 1AF (01-837 3154) 

□ Please rush me NOT ONLY 30 PROGRAMS FOR 


Please rush me NOT ONLY 30 
SINCLAIR ZX81 1 K: at £6.95'each 


THE 


□ 


Please also rush UNDERSTANDING YOUR ZX81 ROM 
by Dr. I. Logan at £8.95 

I enclose a cheque/postal order for £.+ 50p post and pack. 

Name. 

Address. 


THE ACORN ATOM 

NOW AT A PRICE EVERYONE CAN 
AFFORD £135 + VAT (For 8K ROM + 2K 

RAM + 1.8 p.s.u.) 

New price for 12K RAM + 12K ROM, incl. P.S.U. 

£199.00 + VAT 

Also available, ALL Acornsoft + Bug Byte Software 

(Phone for prices) 

WE ALSO STOCK THE ATARI 400 + 800, VIC-20, + 
BBC MICROCOMPUTER, TOGETHER WITH THEIR 
RANGES OF ACCESSORIES + SOFTWARE. 

Computers Jor JUll 

72 North Street, Romford, Essex. Tel: Romford 60725 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 69 
































ffl 



THE FIRST FULL 
FEATURED COLOUR 
COMPUTER AT 

UNDER £200 ! ! 



YOU AND YOUR FAMILY CAN ALL 
ENJOY THIS TERRIFIC NEW 
MACHINE 

LOOK AT THESE FEATURES 

★ Sound 

★ Colour 

★ Programmable function keys 

★ 15K memory, expandable to 32K 

★ Uses standard 'Pet' Basic 

★ Full size typewriter keyboard 

★ Graphics character set 

★ Plug-in memory cartridge 

★ Low priced peripherals 

Get hold of yours from us 


437 Stoney Stanton 
Road, 

Coventry, 

CV65EA 
West Midlands 
Tel: (0203) 86449 


IBEK 


ZX80«iZX81 

ARCADE GAMES FROM QUICKSILVA 

ALL PROGRAMS WRITTEN IN MACHINE CODE 
TO ENSURE FAST FLICKER-FREE GRAPHICS 


QS DEFENDER 



Generally considered to be the best arcade 
type game available for the ZX-Computers 
Up — Down — Thrust — Fire 
First and only full screen display • Software 
to drive QS sound board Moving planet¬ 
ary surface Up to 84 fast moving charac¬ 
ters on screen at once • On screen scoring 
Ten missiles at once Increasing attack 
patterns as the game progresses. 

Quicksilvas new arcade game 

Left — Right — Thrust — Fire 
Software to drive QS sound board • Multiple 
missiles firing in 8 directions ■ On screen 
scoring • Increasing number of asteroids 
Full mobility of ship to all areas of the display 
Asteroids break up into smaller asteroids 
when hit Wrap around screen. 


All programs are recorded twice on high quality cassettes to ensure reliability. 
Cassette inserts are full colour reproductions of original artworks by 
'STEINAR LUND'. Full instructions sent with order. 

QS-DEFENDER 4K For ZX-80 with 4K ROM and minimum of 3K of F?AM 
QS-DEFENDER 8K For ALL machines with 8K ROM and minimum of 3K of RAM 
QS-ASTEROIDS For ZX-81 (or ZX-80 with 8K ROM and FAST/SLOW mod) + 4K 
RAM 

All at the fully inclusive price of £5.50 each. . .. 

For complete arcade realism Quicksilva also produce a range of high quality 
hardware. 

QS SOUND BD For 3 channel sound effects or tunes. 

QS CHRS BD Program your own characters for use with any program. Enables 
display of real SPACE INVADERS characters on your machine. 

Also QS MOTHER BD and QS 3K RAM BD 

Send S.A.E. for data sheets on our complete range of products. Orders and 
enquiries should be sent to the following address: 


QUICKSILVA, 95 UPPER BR0WNHILL ROAD, 
MAYBUSH. SOUTHAMPTON, HANTS 


■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 

SILICON CENTRE 



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1PUTER 


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EDINBURGH 


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MAIL ORDER 

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VIDEO GENIE (16K) 

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21 Comely Bank Road, Edinburgh 4 
Tel: 332 5277 


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ELECTRONICS FOR THE 80s 


70 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



































































s 




40 DATA 
50 READ X, Y 
60 HPLOT X, Y 
70 FOR I — 1 TO N 
80 READ X; Y 
90 HPLOT TO X, Y 
100 NEXT I 
110 DATA 
120 END 

A broadly equivalent program 
for the Atom is given below. 
Since Atom Basic does not pos¬ 
sess READ and DATA state¬ 
ments, the program uses INPUT 
commands so that the number of 
points and the points themselves 
must be entered when the pro- 
grame is run, 

10 INPUT N 

20 DIM X X(N), Y Y (N) 

30 FORI = 0 TO N 


Good graphics are so often the mark 
of a good game. So many computer 
games are given iife by being hung 
around a theme — whether a des¬ 
tructive, you against the aliens 
struggle, or a tactical wargame 
scenario. 

The more detail you can put into a 
graphical representation of the 
theme the more accurate the final 
result can be. High-resolution 
graphics is a popular option with 
computer games players. In this col¬ 
umn we look at this facility on the 
Apple and Acorn Atom. 


Good graphics add playability to 
games which are hung around a 
theme. And the more detail 
which can be included in a 
drawing, the more believable 
the game will be. 

High resolution displays can 
be achieved with several micro¬ 
computers. These include Apple 
II and the Acorn Atom. The Apple 
II with Applesoft gives a resolu¬ 
tion of 280 dots horizontally and 
192 vertically, while the Acorn 
Atom with a full complement of 
RAM provides a resolution of 256 
by 192. The high resolution 
graphics commands available 
on these micros include com¬ 
mands for moving the "drawing 
head” to any position on the 
screen, and for drawing a line 
from the current position to a 
position specified in the com¬ 
mand. 


rectangle to be drawn. The loca¬ 
tion of the rectangle on the 
screen is shown in Figure 1. 

In similar fashion, an Atom 
will draw a rectangle with this 
program. 

10 CLEAR 4 
30 MOVE 60, 60 
40 DRAW 60, 160 
50 DRAW 180, 160 
60 DRAW 180, 60 
70 DRAW 60, 60 
80 END 

Each line of this program is 
broadly equivalent to the line 
with the same number in the 
Apple program. There is no need 
to specify the plotting colour as 
the DRAW command automati¬ 
cally produces a white line. The 
point in row 0 and column 0 is at 
the bottom left of the screen with 
the Atom as opposed to the top 
left with the Apple. 

Now, just as we have drawn a 
rectangle by joining four points 
together, we can draw any 
shape by joining a sufficiently 
large number of points. The 
more points we use, the more 
accurate the drawing will be. 
Outline programs for drawing 
any shape are given below. The 
Apple program requires the 
number of points to be joined to 
be given in the first data state¬ 
ment (in line 40) while the points 
themselves must be specified in 
the data statement at line 110. 
Other data statements can be 
included if necessary. 

10HGR2 
20 HCOLOR =3 
30 READ N 


The following program causes 
a rectangle to be drawn near the 
centre of the screen with an 
Apple. 

10 HGR2 
20 HCOLOR - 3 
30 HPLOT 60, 60 
40 HPLOT TO 60, 160 
50 HPLOT TO 180, 160 
60 HPLOT TO 180, 60 
70 HPLOT TO 60, 60 
80 END 

Line 10 sets the high resolution 
graphics mode, line 20 sets the 
plotting colour to white, and line 
30 plots a dot at the position in 
column 60 and row 60. Lines 40 to 
70 cause the sides of the 


40 INPUT A, B 
50 X X (I) = A; Y Y (I) JIB 
60 NEXT I 
70 CLEAR 4 

80 MOVE X X (0)1 Y Y (0) 

90 FOR I = 1 TO N 
100 DRAW X X (I), Y Y (I) 

110 NEXT I 
120 END 

Figure 2 shows a drawing pro¬ 
duced in the way described by 
these programs. It can be tedi¬ 
ous to find all the points which 
have to be joined. A digitiser is 
useful to obtain the points in as 
painless a way as possible. 
There is a digitiser for the Apple. 


BY BARR* MARSHALL 
























aeRMffls® 



many computer manuals. 


CdNVtKiiwtt 
I programs I 


There is little more frustrating 
than reading about a marvellous 
game which is unavailable on 
your particular microcomputer. 

And, unless you are familiar 
with the other machine's Basic, 
modifying the game to suit your 
computer is a daunting task. 

Hardware and software vary 
so much that there are no gen¬ 
eral rules for converting pro¬ 
grams; the conversion process 
may require anything from 
minor changes in syntax up to 
almost a complete rewrite, and 
the documentation provided may 
be anything from a bare program 
listing to a full explanation of 
the purpose of every section. 

Manuals are usually available 
separately from the dealers who 
sell the machines, and if you 
intend to convert a lot of pro¬ 
grams you will find it very useful 


changes needed, will be to the 
display on the screen. These 
changes will be needed because 
the memory addresses, the 
graphics characters, and the 
number of rows and columns on 
the screen differ among the vari¬ 
ous models of computer avail¬ 
able. If you have the machine- 
dependent information on 
graphics and screen formats, 
which can be obtained from the 
manuals, and understand the 
techniques of memory-mapped 
screens explained in Garry Mar¬ 
shall's Graphics series you 
should have little difficulty in 
converting most programs. 

Hardware differences, such as 
input from a joystick or light pen, 
or sound output, can cause dif¬ 
ficulties. If you do not have these 
features on your computer, 
sound output can be omitted and 
joystick or light pen input 
replaced by input from the 
keyboard, but such changes may 
destroy the point of a game. If 
you do have similar hardware 


features the conversion is often 
straightforward, although you 
may sometimes have a lot of 
work to do because of the differ¬ 
ent software features available 
for controlling these peripherals. 

Most dialects of Basic have a 
common core which varies little 
from machine to machine. Most 
of the differences are in the 
instructions for controlling spe¬ 
cial features, such as joysticks 
and colour graphics. 

There are few differences in 
the syntax and operation of the 
most frequently used Basic 
statements and it is usually 
quite easy to make any changes 
that are necessary. Apart from 
special-purpose instructions 
used for controlling peripherals 
the only instructions likely to 
cause any difficulty are PEEK, 
POKE and USR. 

The commonest use of PEEK 
and POKE is in memory-mapped 
graphics. Other uses may be 
concerned with the computer s 
firmware (the built-in machine 
code programs in ROM that con¬ 
trol the operation of the compu¬ 
ter). In this case you will have to 
find out what the instructions are 


MICRO GEN QUALITY PROGRAMS 
ZX 81 CHESS ZX NEW YORK 


LOOK AT THESE FEATURES 

★ Graphic display of positions on chess board 

★ Displays separate record of your move and the 
computers 

★ Written in superfast machine code 

★ Plays all legal moves including castling and 
enpassant but if an illegal move is entered will 
answer illegal move 

★ Six levels of play 

★ Random weighting computer doesn't always play 
the same move in an identical situation 

★ Board can be set up to any configuration and you 
can even alter or exchange sides in midgame 

★ Amazing power in 10K of memory 

PLUS CHESS CLOCK! 

★ Records and display time taken per player 

★ Resetable function 

★ Single key entry 
£9.50 + 40p p&p 

Please note we also supply Hilderbay Professional Business Software. Details on application 

CHEQUES AND POSTAL ORDERS PAYABLE TO MICRO GEN DEPT VG, 24 AGAR 
CRESCENT, BRACKNELL, BERKS. 


CAN YOU BOMB AND BLOW UP YOUR TARGETS 
BEFORE YOUR PLANE LOSES ALTITUDE AND 
CRASHES 

★ Superb graphics 

★ Superfast machine code 

★ Score continuously incremented 

★ Displays highest score of previous games 

★ Simulated bombs and rockets 

+ ZX reflex 

Are you as fast as you thought? 

Find out with this game! 

Only £4.50 plus 40p p + p 


72 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 











doing and replace them with 
instructions to perform the same 
task on your own computer. 

Some programs include 
machine code subroutines that 
are POKEd into memory and 
accessed by the USR or CALL 
instructions. Unless you are 
familiar with machine code or 
assembly language you are 
unlikely to be able to use such 
machine code subroutines, even 
if your computer contains the 
same microprocessor as the 
machine the routine was written 
for. Machine code subroutines 
often use the ROM routines, and 
even if they do not may use 
areas of memory that are not free 
on a different model of computer. 

Although I have concentrated 
on the difficulties that can arise 
in converting programs, most of 
these difficulties occur only 
occasionally. Once you have got 
used to converting graphics from 
one screen format to another you 
will be able to convert many 
programs that you would other¬ 
wise not be able to use. How¬ 
ever, you should be aware of the 
difficulties, particularly those 
features that you cannot convert, 
as this will save you much time. 


number 

crunching 


Many mathematical problems 
and puzzles appear at first sight 
to be suitable for computer solu¬ 
tions as they seem to be solvable 
by massive amounts of simple 
calculations even if you don't 
know the mathematical methods 
for solving the problems directly. 

However, Basic works very 
slowly; although the result of a 
simple addition or multiplication 
may appear to be printed 
instantly, hundreds of thousands 
of such calculations will take 
hours. Thus it is usually neces¬ 
sary to reduce the amount of cal¬ 
culation needed, and it is often 
possible to do this with only 
elementary mathematics. 

Let us look at the problem of 
finding whole number solutions 
of the equation: 

A 2 = B 2 + C 2 

There are, in fact, an infinite 
number of solutions, so we need 
to fix an upper limit to the solu¬ 



tions we are considering, say 
A—100. The obvious way to start 
is to test all triplets A,B,C less 
than 100, using something like 
the following: 

10 FOR A = 1 TO 100 

20 FOR B = 1 TO 100 

30 FOR C = 1 TO 100 

40 IF A*A < >B*B 4- C*C THEN 60 

50 PRINT A;B;C 

60 NEXT C 

70 NEXT B 

80 NEXT A 

However, this took six-and-a- 
half minutes to find the smallest 
solution, A =5, B =3, C =4, and 
would take almost three hours to 
run to completion. It will also 
produce each solution twice; e.g. 
as well as A =5, B=3, C =4, it 
gives A =5, B =4, C =3, which is 
not really distinct. 

We can make the program 
much faster, and eliminate the 
redundant solutions, by noting 
that A must be greater than B or 
C and we can arbitrarily chose to 
have B^>C. Thus we need only 
test those cases where A>B and 
B>C. This could be done by 
inserting two extra tests be¬ 
tween lines 30 and 40, but it can 
be done more efficiently by mod¬ 
ifying the limits in the FOR . . . 
NEXT loops. If lines 10-30 are 
replaced by: 

10 FOR A-3 TO 100 

20 FOR B =2 TO A-l 

30 FOR C=1 TO B —1 

the running time will be reduced 

to 27 minutes, which is over six 

times as fast as the first version. 

The problem does have a 
mathematical solution which 
can be derived very simply, 
although the details of the deri¬ 
vation make it too long to 
include here. The details of the 
solution can be found in almost 
any book on elementary number 
theory, and does not require any 


special mathematical know¬ 
ledge for its understanding. 

The solution is that all values 
of A,B,C satisfying 

A 2 = B 2 + C 2 

can be found from the equations 

A = P 2 + Q 2 
B - 2*P*Q 

C = P 2 -Q 2 

It is easy to see that this does 
give solutions, since 
A 2 = (P 2 + Q 2 ) 2 

•= P 4 / 2*P 2 *Q 2 4- Q 4 
while 

B 2 4- C 2 = (2*P*Q) 2 4- (P 2 - Q 2 ) 2 
=4*P 2 *Q 2 4- P 4 - 

2*P 2 *Q 2 4- Q 4 
- P 4 4- 2*P 2 *Q 2 4- Q 4 

The less straightforward part 
of the derivation is in the proof 
that these formulae do actually 
give all solutions. 

It is a simple matter to write a 
program to produce solutions 
from the formulae above: 

10 FOR P - 2 TO 1000 
20 FOR Q = 1 TO P -1 
30 LET A = P*P 4- Q*Q 
40 LET B = 2*P*Q 
50 LET C = P*P - Q*Q 
60 PRINT A;B;C; 

70 NEXT Q 
80 NEXT P 

When this program is run the 
solutions shoot up the screen too 
fast to read; values less than 100 
come out in a few seconds, and 
within half an hour the program 
is giving solutions with six 
digits. 

This shows the enormous 
advantage that can be gained by 
using a little simple mathema¬ 
tics to solve a problem, rather 
than relying on the "brute force 
and ignorance" method of the 
first program above, which will 
produce the answer but may tie 
up your computer for hours or 
even days. 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 73 













THINK 


SOUPED-UP 


OUT IN 3-D 


Sixth Sense is a misleading name 
for a game which requires you 
think in three dimensions. 

From the Milton Bradley 
stable. Sixth Sense is a double 
game. Firstly there is a 3-D ver¬ 
sion of the Connect Four game 
and secondly a "maze" game. 
The object of the former is 
place four of your counters in 
row on one level of the frame, 
to place four counters in a row 
on different levels. 

Altogether there are four 
layers of the frame in which to 
place your counters with a total 
of 16 spaces. The counters you 
play with are actually square 
shaped cubes which slot into 
each space. 

Remember to check the coun¬ 
ters on the bottom level of the 
centre section which are difficult 
to see when they have been built 
upon. When one of you finally 
wins a victory tune plays. 

In the second game your task 
is to follow a pre-programmed 
"maze" pattern which is formed 
on each level of the frame. The 
computer controlled display tells 
you when you have made an 
incorrect move and you can only 
continue your turn if you have 
moved into the correct space. 

You can take consolation in 
the knowledge that the maze 
only follows a vertical and hori¬ 
zontal path, it won't go diagonally 
and once it has reached one level 
it will not descend again. 

The winner of the game is the 
first person to reach the end of 
the maze. Sometimes you might 
have to use your opponent's 
counters as a scaffold to climb to 
the right level in the maze. Each 
player is given the same number 
of moves to complete the maze. 

Sixth Sense is scheduled to be 
on sale in most large toy shops 
from July of this year and will 
cost £17.59. 


INVADERS 

A sophisticated space invaders 
hand held game will grace shop 
shelves later in the year keeping 
the craze lingering on. 

Called Alien Attack, the object 
is to shoot down as many aliens 
as you can. You have three firing 
ships fitted with lasers to blast at 
your attackers. At the start of the 
game the aliens move onto the 
corners of the L.C.D. screen and 
home in on your space ships, 
firing beams as they fly. The 


The British toy industry spends January and early February 
unveiling its plans tor the coming year. Here we present a 
selection ot electronic games and toys which will be 
competing for our at tentions next Christmas. 

MRIUTE MUNCHMEN 


Last year's arcade successes are 
this year's toys. The Puckman 
type game seems to be following 
in the trend set by Space In¬ 
vaders and appearing in every 
conceivable format. 

From Adam Imports comes 
Mini-Munchman which can be 
played on the tiny screen that 
also doubles up as a watch. 
About the same size as an aver¬ 
age calculator the clock has full 
functions, including a stop watch, 
an alarm, lap timer, day and date. 

There has been a plethora of 
hand-held Munchman type 
games but this is the first to be 
used in the pocket watch format. 

The game itself sticks closely 
to the original version with the 
player in control of a munchman 
who rushes around the screen 
eating dots as he goes. 

Mini Munchman's makers 
Adam Imports anticipate supplies 


should filter into the shops in 
March retailing for about £18. 

In the same series, is a. golf 
game which will also cost £18. 

This game again is unique for 
the range. You control a golfer 
who has to swing his way 
through a nine hole course. It has 
little features incorporated into 
the game to give the player more 
information, like figures display¬ 
ing the distance the ball is away 
from the hole he is playing. 

Adam Imports says that the skill 
of the game is pressing the but¬ 
ton at the correct time when the 
golf club is on the back swing. 


"meanies" come in waves of six, 
but once you destroy those there 
is no let up — another batch will 
be instantly sent on the rampage. 

There are two skill levels and 
many different speeds to master. 

Alien Attack is one of Peter 
Pan Plaything's new toys for 
1982. It was originally released in 
America and is made by US toy 
firm Coleco. The game does 
however fall at the top end of the 
price range retailing at around 
the £50 mark. 


CHIPS ARE CHILD'S PLAY 


A treat for children with a taste 
for music will be in store mid¬ 
year. 

On a touch sensory surface, 
children can learn to play and 
sing along to their favourite 
stories with this new electronic 
toy. The microprocessor hidden 
inside the toy memorises the 
tunes and when the correct 
coloured button is pressed the 
corresponding note is emitted. 
Called the Musical Story Book, 
the toy has two different octaves 
and an automatic shut-down 
device, acting as a power saver 
in case of forgetful children — 
who leave it on. 

Coming in a square shaped 
case, the board consists of 64 
keys which represent the note* 


played. At the top of the eight 
columns the letter of the note is 
stamped in large letters making it 
easy for the child to read. 

With the actual toy comes a 
selection of cards on which the 
stories are written. To play the 
tune the child reads the card 
following a "road" map consist¬ 
ing of lines linked up by circles 
containing the correct musical 
note. 

Included in the list of musical 
stories are Happy Birthday and 
Ba Ba Blacksheep. 

Peter Pan Playthings is the 
firm behind this toy and has 
assigned it a price of £16. It is 
due in the shops in July and runs 
off one nine volt battery which is 
not included in the package. 


74 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 












LEARN THE SECRETS 
OF THE DARK TOWER 



Leading a band of warriors to 
overthrow the forces of the 
brigand king who has stolen a 
people's precious sceptre is the 
theme of a new concept in 
games. 

Dark Tower is a unique idea 
combining a traditional board 
game with an electronic game. 
The centrepiece is the tower 
itself which is mounted in the 
middle of the playing board. That 
is the microprocessor controlled 
part of the game. At the front of 
the tower is a large "window” 
which acts as a screen and 
shows each player what is hap¬ 
pening to his troops. 

On the board are marked four 
citadels containing a tomb, a 
sanctuary, a bazaar and mins 
which each player occupies for 
the duration of the game. The 
ultimate aim is to attack the Dark 
Tower and oust the evil brigand 
king. 

But to do that you must find 
three keys made of brass, silver 
and gold and solve the riddle of 
the keys. These vital objects are 


Practise snapping back answers 
to general knowledge questions 
from a know-all toy which 
would give Magnus Magnusson a 
run for his money. 

Joining in the Mastermind 
test of general knowledge, this 
new toy is designed for the 
entire family. Altogether there 
are 19 different subjects for you 
to answer questions on when 
you play Family Challenge. This 
microchip controlled game poses 
a total of 1,001 questions and 
contains a number of special fea¬ 
tures. 

You can begin the game's play 
on any question you choose by 
pressing the selection button, so 
if you don't fancy your chances 
on the one first posed you can 
pick another. 

If there are several difficult 
questions in a row you can use 
the fast forward button to 
advance the process quickly. 
Lights and sound help brighten it. 

The U.K. distributor is Peter 
Pan Playthings of Peterborough 
and the game will retail at around 
the £50 mark. Family Challenge is 
the big brother of Master Chal¬ 
lenge also made by Peter Pan. 


hidden in each of the citadels 
(but none in your own) so you 
have to move around each citadel 
in a clockwise direction to obtain 
the treasures. 

You use plastic models to rep¬ 
resent the characters involved in 
the game and move them around 
the board. 

At the beginning of the game, 
each of the four players is allo¬ 
cated 10 warriors, 30 bags of gold 
and 25 food rations. Anything can 
happen to you on your travels 
and you must watch out for hid¬ 
den dangers which might befall 
you and your soldiers. Like the 
fire-breathing dragon which you 
could run into, or the fatal plague 
that can kill off half your army. 
Sometimes you will inevitably 
have to set to battle with some 
of the other brigands in pursuit 
of their keys. 

Throughout your military cam¬ 
paign you must keep an eye on 
how many food rations you have 
left for your warriors. Hungry 
soldiers aren't much good in an 
exhausting battle. 


A booklet of new questions for 
Master Challenge is also new 
out. Altogether there are 1,001 
questions based on popular tele¬ 
vision quiz programmes like Ask 
the Family, Mastermind and A 
Question of Sport All for £6.75. 

The booklet contains quiz 
questions and can be used with 
the new game. Family Challenge 
is battery run, but they are not 
supplied with the toy. 


You can replenish your sup¬ 
plies in the bazaars using your 
gold, and you can even haggle to 
bring the price down if it's too 
high. 

To make a move in the game 
you must press one of the but¬ 
tons on the tower's control con¬ 
sole — there are 12 in all — to 
indicate where you want to move 
to. After you have pressed a 
button a response and further 
directions will flash up on the 
screen for you to follow. The 
tower swivels round so that only 
the player whose turn it is can 
see what the window reveals. 

Once you have found the keys 
you still can't rush in and storm 
the Tower. First you have to 
solve the riddle of the keys for 
only then will the portcullis open 
allowing you to lay seige. If you 
win the tower plays a victory 
tune and the retrieved sceptre is 
held high in triumph. Before 
marching into battle make sure 
you have enough troops to stand 
a good chance of success. 

This Milton Bradley game has 
the potential to be one of the 
most sought-after of 1982, and is 
certainly one of the most 
imaginative of this year's batch of 
new launches. It will be on sale 
later in the year for £30 from 
most large toy shops. 


A GAME TO 
SINK YOUR 
TEETH INTO 

Your blood will start to curdle 
when you sink your teeth into 
Dracula. 

When your fingers touch the 
chilly casing of the electronic 
game Dracula, you are con¬ 
fronted by the plan of a haunted 
house. You have to find your way 
through the house avoiding the 
obvious dangers of coffins (which 
could contain cousins of Dracula), 
and that particularly poisonous 
type of bat which flies in heavy 
numbers through haunted 
houses. 

Dracula is an extension of the 
range which Adam Imports 
brought out last year. It will be 
available in a plastic casing, con¬ 
sisting of a flat console where 
the control push buttons are 
located and a screen for the 
player to look at displaying the 
action of the game. 

The object of Dracula is to 
steer clear of the dracula symbol, 
for obvious reasons. If you get 
too close to his fangs . . . 

Unfortunately, it won't be in 
the shops until July at the 
earliest and is due to retail at just 
under the £30 mark. 

Astroblaster is the new, 
improved version of Adam 
Imports' Astro Wars. It is in the 
same vein as that game but fol¬ 
lows the arcade game Scramble. 
On the horizontal display you see 
an undulating lunar surface 
which constantly changes as 
your aeroplane flies above. 

Various alien space craft and 
creatures fly towards you at 
intermittent periods. You score 
points by successfully shooting 
down the enemy ships and by 
blasting the ground bases. 

Astroblaster is also expected 
to sell for just under £30 and 
should be on shop shelves at 
about the same time as Dracula. 



COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 75' 



MAGNUS' MICRO RIVAL 
















DFTWARE SOFTWARE SOFTWARE SOFTWARE SOF 



QUEST FOR 

HIDDEN 

PLUNDER 


PIRATE ISLAND 


Pirates are common inhabitants 
of adventure games and as every 
schoolboy knows: where there 
are pirates, treasure is never far 
away. 

Supplied on a C12 cassette, 
Pirate Island loads in two parts 
corresponding to the two mem¬ 
ory blocks of the Atom and dur¬ 
ing the second load instructions 
are presented on the screen. 

This gives you something to 
look at while waiting for the cas¬ 
sette to finish the load. 

The object of this fast and 
exciting game, is to collect vari¬ 
ous items of treasure and trans¬ 
port them back to your ship while 
avoiding many obstacles and 
hazards placed in your path. 

In common with other adven¬ 
ture games, the computer recog¬ 
nises commands typed in English 
such as "North", "Up", "Eat the 
Sandwich" and so on. 

The machine replies with "I 
can't" or "I don't understand" if 
the command is not recognised 
or incorrectly phrased, and 
allows another attempt. 

There is a small screen flash 
after each input, but it is of very 
short duration and after a short 
while becomes unnoticable. 

Altogether there are over 30 
locations and more than 25 
objects which will be required 
during your hunt for ’treasure. 
This is achieved by using only 
five bits per character instead of 
the usual eight, thus making the 
program appear larger than the 
12K. Watch out for poisonous 
darts, crocodiles, gorillas and of 
course, pirates. 


CRACKHG GRAPHICS 


SPACE EGGS & SPACE WARRIORS 


The space theme lingers on in 
two Apple discs, Space Eggs and 
Space Warriors. 

The two discs represent all 
that's good and all that's bad, in 
ames software. They concen- 
on j^edless destruction, 



Useful things to pick up are a 
tinder box, pieces of eight, a 
knife and a green eyed golden 
idol. 

Pirate Island is an easy and 
compulsive game to play, but 
requires skill and .a certain 
amount of luck to get the best 
score which is shown at the end 
of the game. Yes, the best score, 
16 out of 16, is possible! 

The program is written in 
machine code and uses up the 
whole 12K RAM of the expanded 
Acorn Atom, it is available from 
Hopesoft of Newbury in Berks. 
An excellent piece of software it 
is well worth the £6.75 price-tag. 


but use fantastic graphics. 

Space Eggs can be found in 
the arcades under the name 
Moon Cresta. 

The game is a variation of the 
usual space invaders theme 
whereby the player has a joystick 
type control to move the space 
ship from left to right, and a fire 
button. Three levels of difficulty 
are present. 


A three part space ship splits 
up, giving you three attempts at 
destroying the eggs. Unlike the 
usual games, when you destroy 
an egg a space-thing appears out 
of it with a number on it. The 
number indicates the points 
awarded if you hit it. 

Unfortunately the space-thing 
moves very erratically, usually in 
the direction of your space ship. 
If it touches you then that's it. 

Space Warrior involves the 
rotating joystick to move a static 
spaceship that is surrounded by 
a force field. Attacking space 
craft are destroyed by lining up 
the space ship and pushing the 
fire button. Again the space craft 
follow erratic paths making 
defence difficult. 

Marvellous graphics and a 
familiar space battle theme, the 
games rely purely on speed and 
reactions but they seem to give 
hours of enjoyment to those in 
early teens and younger. 

Both are available from Pete 
and Pam Computers for £13.95 
each, to run on an Apple II. For 
Space Eggs you need 48K mem¬ 
ory and 32K for Space Warrior. 


WHISKED INTO ACTION 



ARCADE SCRAMBLE 


There's plenty of action when 
your craft takes to the skies in 
Arcade Scramble. And the good 
graphics make this arcade spin¬ 
off a cut above most others. 

The mission theme which gave 
Scramble a big arcade following 
is recreated with plenty of 
hazards for the player's plane. 

You have six controls which 
use the arrow keys (or letter 
keys if you wish) to alter your 
altitude, give forward and 
reverse movement, drop bombs 
and fire your guns. 

The game is written in 
machine language, and after load¬ 
ing it via the system command 
and seeing the title page you are 
given a cross section representa¬ 
tion of the enemy territory with 
mountains, valleys, rocket 
launching pads, ack-ack pads, 
forts, munition dumps and fuel 
dumps. 


Your plane flies across the 
screen whilst the ground unfolds 
beneath you from right to left. 
Using the controls, bomb the 
enemy posts without flying into 
the landscape. Further hazards 
include enemy missiles, clusters 
of blimbs in the air (which you 
must avoid) and ack-ack from 
enemy gun posts. Without warn¬ 
ing, enemy aircraft appear to 
intercept you and you either 
have to dodge or shoot them 
down. 

The game is not difficult to 
learn but does take some prac¬ 
tice to achieve a satisfactory 
score. Should you have a suitable 
amplifier connected the game 
provides arcade type sound 
effects. 

The game runs on a TRS-80 
Model 1 and a Video Genie and 
the cassette costs £9.50 from 
Kansas City Systems. 























































TEAM 4 SOFTWARE 



UP 301 - XBAS : add eleven new BASIC 
commands in TRS-80 level II non-disc 
BASIC (also Video Genje) + instructions 
+ free BREAKOUT program to demon¬ 
strate the commands.4.95 

GP 3001 - LUNAR LANDER/3D MAZE/ 
DOMINOES : 'three of the best' for the 
home arcade games addict.7.95 

GP 3002 — CATHEDRAL ADVENTURE 
GAME: Can you find the thirteen 
treasures before the mad monk finds 
you. 16k .11.50 

GP 3003 — CASTLE OF LONDON: Thir¬ 
teen more treasures for you to find, a 
little harder than you may think. 16k 
. 11.50 

GP 3004 — LONDON TOWN: Learn about 
the geography of London whilst 
playing this wonderful new adven¬ 
ture. 16k .11.50 


GP 1005 — TWENTY GAMES FOR ZX81, 

including Codebreak, Adventure, 
Motor Cars, 3 Pile Nim, Pontoon. 16K 
.4.95 

UP 101 - ZX80/81 CONVERTER : allows 
you to load ZX80 (old RDM) programs 
onto ZX81 (new RDM). Full instruc¬ 
tions included.7.95 

UP 102 - DATABAS : write to or read 
from cassette up to 14k of data + 
REMKILL: gets rid of unwanted REM 
statements.4.95 

GP 1001 - TREK '81 : exciting version 
of the classic 'Star Trek' game with 
computer assisted attacks! (16k) . .7.95 

GP 1002 - BATTLECHESS (2 players) : 

ZX81 version of 'Star Chess' with full 
screen graphics (16k).5.95 

GP 1003 - STARSHOOT/ACEY DEUCY/ 
JUPITER LANDER : three great games for 
the Ik ZX81.3.95 

GP 1004 — CATHEDRAL ADVENTURE 
GAME: Can you find the thirteen 
treasures before the mad monk finds 
you. 16k .11.50 


UP 201 - SHAPEMAKER/SCREENSWAP 
(2k) : draw your own graphical shapes 
and store them in your programs. Demo 
program included.7.95 

UP 2001 - INVADERS/HEDGEHOG 
(6+6k) : 'classic' addictive games . . .6.95 



GP 4001 - 3D MICROMAZE: wander 
around the insides of your Atari! 
Frustration guaranteed.4.95 

GP 4002 - RAT TRAP : 2-player game of 
skill and daring.4.95 


All programs supplied on high-quality 
cassettes. Orders to:- 


TEAM 4 
SOFTWARE 

Dept. TM 

12 Taunton House, 
Redcar Road, 
Harold Hill, 
Romford, Essex. 



COMPUTER 100 

LIMITED 



MZ/80K SPECIAL OFFER! 

INCLUDING BASIC TAPE AND PROGRAMMING 
MANUAL 

A proper full size microcomputer for 
less than the real cost of a toy micro¬ 
computer. The Sharp comes with 48k of 
RAM and the screen and cassette are 
built in, instead of being expensive 
extras. 

Computer 100 Limited 

7 Southcote Parade, 
Southcote Farm 

Lane, 

Southcote, 

Reading, RG3 3D7. 

Reading (0734) 584545 ! 

Full range of all Sharp 
peripherals stocked at highly 
competitive prices. Ring for 
further details. 

Price is inclusive of VAT at current rate of 15%. Add 
£7.50 carriage/insurance to Mail Orders. 




I 


COMPUTER 100 LIMITED 

Name: 


MAIL ORDER FORM 


Address: 





Post Code: 

Tel.: 


Card No: 



Mail to: Computer 100 Limited, 

7 Southcote Parade, Southcote, 
Reading, Berks, RG3 3D7. 


CVG 02/82 


J 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 77 




























































a must for 
vour ZX8| 

Authors: Ian Stewart & Robin Jones 

The reader-friendly guide to getting started with the 
Sinclair ZX81. Includes an introduction to looping and 
branching, graphics, subroutines, and debugging 
techniques, with over 50 programs designed to run 
on the standard IK memory. 


Approx. 130 pages Paperback £4.95 

Publication: 4 January 1982 


ISBN 0 906812 17 8 


Published by: Shiva Publishing Ltd., 4 Church Lane, 
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* SOFTWARE * PERIPHERALS 
* COMPUTER CHESS GAMES 


in^niis 


r 


ZX81 


26 Spiers Close 
Knowle, Solihull 
West Midlands 
B93 9ES England 


ZX80 


IK Space 
Invaders 



A superb version of the famous arcade 
game in fast interactive graphs. A4 x2 
array of aliens descend moving right & 
left and they can detect your Laser Base 
so keep it on the move. Previous and 
current game'On screen’ scoring. 
Destructable protective shields and 
keyboard control of the Laser Base & 
Laser Bolt firing using & [^> and the 
Rubout key. 


IK Breakout 



An interactive graphs.9 ball game, as 
Invaders written in m/c for good graphs. 
Try your skill and patience at knocking 
all bricks from the wall. Use <^] & 
to control the paddle. 



From a range of 8 notes you can use your 
ZX as a toy piano. Your selected notes are 
written to cassette-continous prompt for 
new selection of notes- pby back your 
cassette and just listen to it sing. Example 
tunes. 


3 CASSETTES & PROGRAM LISTINGS FOR 


Commodore VIC due 


ONLY £6.95!! 



Dept, cvg, 50 Newton St.,0ff Piccadilly, 
Manchester Ml 2EA. Tel: 061 236 3083. 


WE ARE AT THE CORNER NEWTON ST./ HILTON ST. 


Startrek 16K — All the usual features £4.95 
Life 16K — Fast full screen M/C version £3.95 

Mission of 16K — A dangerous recovery mission 
The Deep in the murky depths. 3 play levels. £5.95 

Pontoon/Fruit 

Machine 16K — Good graphics £3.95 
16 K Ram Pack (ZX81) £37.50 


78 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 
















































3FTWARE SOFTWARE SOFTWARE SOFTWARE SOI 


DANGER IN 
THE DEPTHS 


HALLS OF DEATH 


Down into the depths to face 
danger and earn your rewards, 
the standard adventure game 
format is relived in Halls of 
Death. 

The object of the game is to 
explore the various cave levels of 
the Halls of Death, collecting 
treasures and slaughtering mon¬ 
sters before you are killed. 

If you do manage to get out 
you are given a rating based on 
the treasures you have been able 
to retrieve and the monsters you 
have killed. The deeper you go, 
the nastier the monsters (watch 
out for that Mummy) and the 
greater the treasures that can be 
found. I liked the Dragon! 

Movement around the levels is 
via the number pad in the usual 
manner; other commands are 
prompted on the screen — usu¬ 
ally requesting the pushing of 
one letter or another. The pro¬ 
gram generates a player for you 
with certain characteristics. 
There is an option of saving 
characters at the end (if they 
survive) and reading them back 
into the game, to continue play¬ 
ing next time. 

One of the best features of the 
game is the combat, which has a 
realistic points system. If you 
remain undecided on what to do, 
your opponent carries on fighting 
— usually with nasty results. 

Watch out for some special 
effects from some of the mon¬ 
sters — it pays to run from some 
of them. 

You can try out spells too, but 
you don't know what they do 
until you try them. They turn out 
to be sleep, teleport, lightning 
bolt, fireball — woe betide you if 
you don't have enough spell 
points when you start using 
them! 

One fault the game has is that 
it is possible to ruin the map on 
the screen if you push the wrong 
key in spell use, but this is a 
minor fault in a game that I found 
quite compulsive, expecially as I 
tended to get killed at the most 
interesting point! It runs on a Pet 
in 16K and costs £14 from Super- 
soft of Middlesex. 




FENCING WITH AUENS 


SPACE INVADERS AND PINBALL 


Spacewar brings the alien invad¬ 
ers back to your screen but puts 
them behind a wall. 

This cross between Space 
Invaders and Breakout has 
kamikaze alien spaceships trying 
to knock bricks out of a wall 
which it is up to you to defend. 

Every 1,500 points a new bar¬ 
rier magically appears to replace 
the old battered one. 

Your resources amount to five 
laser bases, which seem pretty 
meager when compared to the 
alien commander, who has 400 
craft at his disposal. 

If you manage to destroy all 
the aliens a message appears 
telling you what a hero you are. 
But there is one small bug in the 
program, when the last base has 
been destroyed the firing sound 
effect still continues whenever 
you press the fire key. 

On the same Acorn Atom cas¬ 
sette is Pinball, a version which 
is the best I have yet seen on a 
computer. The game uses low 
resolution graphics and needs 5K 
of text space memory, so it will 
run on a semi-expanded Atom. 

In this version of Pinball, the 
table has been put on its side so 
that the flippers are on the left 
hand side of the screen rather 
than at the bottom. This makes 
the game slightly more difficult 
to master if you are used to 
playing on normal pinball 
machines but you should soon 
get used to it. The game 


becomes very fast moving and a 
great amount of skill and con¬ 
centration is required to get a 
good score. You are allowed up 
to nine balls with which to try to 
get up to 999,990 (you'll never do 
it) although a score of about 
100,000 is quite reasonable. 

Neither of these games need a 
floating point ROM. On the same 
cassette but more disappointing 
are, Drive and Letters which 
make up the four games. Still at 
only £5 from Timedata I would 
strongly recommend this cas¬ 
sette to all Acorn Atom users. 

D0DNDARIES, 
BOWLERS AND 
STATISTICS 


MINI-CRICKET 


If there is a statistical game that 
the ZX81 would be good at, it 
must be cricket. Unfortunately 
Mini-Cricket only makes a fair 
effort at simulating the one day 
game. 

Mini-Cricket is a game for two 
players against each other or one 
player against the computer. On 
loading the program the ZX81 
asks you what type of game you 
want to play, one or two players? 
The computer then goes on to 
ask you to name your team and 
the 11 players in it, of these, four 


bowlers must be nominated. The 
computer tosses a coin and tells 
you if you are batting or bowling. 

The main display, a scorecard, 
is then printed up on the screen. 
You are asked to nominate a 
bowler for the first over, or — if 
you are batting — whether, you 
want to attack or defend. 

This happens every over and 
there are 20 in each innings. 
Bowlers nomination is necessary 
as some bowlers are better than 
others. Those two choices are 
the only ones you are allowed to 
take and make the program 
slightly disappointing in that 
respect. 

After making your decision the 
scorecard will alter every ball to 
tell you who is batting, how many 
runs were scored off that ball, 
alter the team total and update 
the bowlers' figures. If it is the 
second innings, you are told 
what the opposition had scored 
at the same point in the first 
innings, a nice touch that adds a 
bit of excitement. If the 
scorecard flashes "Owzat" you 
have to wait for the umpire the 
ZX81 — to make a decision. 

Unless you are a cricket buff, 
this is a game that will only be 
played now and again. It is not 
enough of a simulation to replay 
actual games and is therefore 
slightly disappointing. The 
documentation is excellent and 
stands as a target for other soft¬ 
ware suppliers. Mini-Cricket is 
available from Emvee Soft¬ 
ware of Lytham in Lancs., 
and is priced £5.95 and 
needs 16K of memory. 









































gnelucka 

CHANCE 

Most games involve some ele¬ 
ment of "chance" or "luck". This 
element of chance is introduced 
into a game by actions such as 
rolling dice, shuffling cards or 
spinning a wheel. 

For any such action, we know 
that each of the possible out¬ 
comes is equally likely to occur. 
When you roll a dice, you may 
get a 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6. The chance 
of getting a "1" is no different 
from that of getting any other of 
the numbers. By the action of 
rolling the dice, you are select¬ 
ing one of the numbers at ran¬ 
dom. I will now show you how 
you can introduce this idea of 
chance in your programs. 

In Basic, there is a function 
RND which selects numbers in 
the range of 0 to 1 (not including 
1) at random. Every time the 
computer encounters ("RND" in a 
basic program, it will select 
another number between 0 and 
1. To illustrate this, try running 
the following program 
10 FOR I = 1 TO 20 
20 PRINT RND 
30 NEXT I 
40 END 

A list of 20 numbers, each in 
the range of 0 to 1, will be 
printed. They will appear to be 
selected randomly in that they 
will not follow any obvious pat¬ 
tern. In fact, these numbers have 
been generated by the computer 
using a mathematical rule which 
produces a list of numbers with 
this property of "randomness". 
This mathematical rule is called 
a "Pseudo-Random Number 
Generator" — meaning that it 
generates numbers that appear 
to be random. 

Different computers use differ¬ 
ent Pseudo-Random Number 
Generators. As a result, the 
operation and format of the RND 
function varies slightly from one 


computer system to another. On 
many systems you have to 
include a value in brackets after 
"RND" — for example, RND(l). 
The operation of the RND func¬ 
tion will depend upon the value 
given in brackets. 

Later, I will give some exam¬ 
ples of the effects of different 
values for some of the popular 
personal computers that adopt 
this format. For the moment, it 
suffices to say that on most of 
these systems replacing line 20 
of the previous program with 

20 PRINT RND(l) 

should give a program that will 
generate a list of random num¬ 
bers — each lying between 0 and 
1 . 


1HE ROEt 
Of 1® 

How can you use this function 
RND to simulate rolling a die in a 
game? The function RND pro¬ 
vides us with a number in the 
range 0 to 1. We require some 
way of converting this to one of 
the digits 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 6. Let's 
examine the conversion process 
step by step. 

If RND gives a number in the 
range 0 to 1 (not including 1), 
then 6*RND will give a number 
in the range 0 to 6 (not including 
6). By adding on 1, we would 
then have a number in the range 
1 to 7 (not including 7). 

For example: if RND would 
give 0.217873; then 6*RND would 
give 1.30724; and 6*RND + 1 
would give 2.30724. 

By using 6*RND + 1 we can 
generate numbers in the desired 


range, however, we are only 
interested in the "integer part" of 
these numbers i.e. the part 
before the decimal point, 
in Basic, there is a function INT 
that provides the "integer part" 
of a given number. 

INT(3.25) is 3 as 3.25 can be 
expressed as 3+0.25 
INT (-2.6) is -3 as -2.6 can be 
expressed as —3+0.4 

From the second of the exam¬ 
ples above, you can see that the 
function INT is not quite so 
straightforward when dealing 
with negative numbers. How¬ 
ever, in our case, we are only 
interested in positive numbers. 
When the value is positive, the 
operation of INT can be 
described as returning the part 
of the number before the decimal 
point and ignoring the rest. 

The following program will 
simulate rolling a die 20 times 
and print a list of outcomes. 

10 FOR I = 1 TO 20 
20 PRINT INT (6*RND+1) 

30 NEXT I 
40 END 

A similar program could be 
produced to simulate a roulette 
wheel by using INT(37*RND) — 
remember, the possible out¬ 
comes are 0, 1, 2, ... 36. 

Clearly, these programs are 
not of much interest on their 
own. Later in the series I will 
show how they can be included 
in a games-playing program. 

If you try running the previous 
programs more than once, you 
will find that they always pro¬ 
duce the same output. A compu¬ 
ter game would soon become 
very boring if it always used the 
same random numbers each 


80 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 



























time it ran. We need to be able to 
adapt the Pseudo-Random 
Number Generator so that it will 
generate a different sequence of 
random numbers each' time we 
use it. 

It is this aspect of Pseudo- 
Random Number Generators 
that tends to vary greatly from 
one system to another. I will 
describe the most common alter¬ 
natives. 

In those systems where the 
function is simply expressed as 
"RND", there will be a keyword 
RANDOMIZE or RAND that can 
be included in a program before 
the first RND function. The inclu¬ 
sion of a line containing the 
appropriate keyword will result 
in a different set of random 
numbers being generated each 
time the program is run. 

On the Sinclair ZX81, my prog¬ 
ram for "rolling a die" could be 
adapted to: 

10 RAND 

20 FOR I - 1 TO 20 
30 PRINT INT (6*RND+1) 

40 NEXT I 
50 END 

When I introduced systems 
that used the format RND (1), I 
stated that the operation of the 
Pseudo-Random Number 
Generator depended upon the 
value inside the brackets. 

On the Commodore Pet, a 
program using RND(l) will pro¬ 
duce the same random number 
sequence each time the program 
is run, whereas RND(0) will 
result in a different sequence 
each time the program is run. 

On the Atari, the use of RND(l) 
will produce a different sequ¬ 
ence of random numbers each 
time the program is run, Rather 
than being used to generate a 


sequence of random numbers, 
RND(0) returns the value of the 
most recently generated random 
number. 

It is a great pity that all the 
systems are so inconsistent! 

There are situations when you 
will wish to select alternative 
sections of your program 
depending upon the data input 
or, perhaps, the value of a ran¬ 
dom number. Such selections 
can be made by using an IF 
statement to test whether a 
specified condition is true. If the 
condition is true, then a "jump" 
is made to a particular section of 
the program. To illustrate the 
use of an IF statement I will 
consider a very simple example. 


TOSSING 

■A COW | 


How can we write a program to 
simulate tossing a coin — the 
possible outcomes being a "tail" 
or a"head"? 

The function RND selects a 
number between 0 and 1 at ran¬ 
dom. It is equally likely that the 
number will lie in the lower half 
of the range or the upper half of 
the range. Similarly, when you 
toss a coin, it is equally likely 
that the outcome will be a "tail" 
or a "head". We may therefore 
decide that if the random 
number is in the lower half of the 
range, it represents a "tail"; and 
if it is in the upper half of the 
range, it represents a "head". 

Our program would therefore 
take the form 
if RND < 0.5 then 

print "TAILS" 



otherwise 
print "HEADS" 

end 

We therefore have two alterna¬ 
tive sections in the program — 
either we print the message 
"TAILS" or we print the message 
"HEADS". If the condition that 
RND <0.5 is true, then we print 
"TAILS". 

10 IF RND <0.5 THEN 40 
20 PRINT "HEADS" 

30 GOTO 50 
40 PRINT "TAILS" 

50 END 

If the condition RND <0.5 is 
true, then the computer will 
"jump" ahead to line 40. If the 
condition is not true, then the 
jump will be ignored and the 
computer will continue, as nor¬ 
mal, with the following line — in 
the above example it will go to 
line 20. 

In the case where "HEADS" is 
printed, the computer must 
"jump" over line 40 — otherwise 
the message "TAILS" would also 
be printed. This is achieved by 
using a 'GOTO' statement. A 
GOTO statement simply 
specifies the line number the 
computer will "jump" to. 

The IF statement is sometimes 
referred to as a "conditional 
jump" while the GOTO state¬ 
ment is sometimes referred to as 
an "unconditional jump". 


NEXT issue 

SOLVING 

PROBUMS 


I have briefly introduced the IF 
and GOTO statements. Next 
month, I will describe the use 
and format of these statements 
in more detail. 

The programs discussed so far 
have been very simple. You have 
the knowledge to write reason¬ 
ably complex programs — it is 
now just a matter of gaining 
experience in using that know¬ 
ledge. 

I will work through the steps 
involved in developing a pro¬ 
gram for a specified problem 
next issue. 


NEXT ISSUE 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 81 












ZX81 


Learning 
BASIC 
with your 
Sinclair ZX80 

Robin Norman 

This book will be of great value to all 
ZX80 owners. It tells you how to get 
the ZX80 working, how to program it 
and how to get the best out of it. 
Contains all the information necessary 
to use the Sinclair ZX80 to the full 
plus 14 specially written programs 
unavailable elsewhere. 


Microprocessors 
for Hobbyists 

Ray Coles 

Adapted from a popular series of 
articles in Practical Electronics, this 
book takes the reader step by step 
through the mysteries of the 
microprocessor chip and its instruction 
set, the support components such as 
memories and communication interfaces, 
and the use of the microprocessor in 
home computers. 

0 408 00414 2 92 pages 

£3.25 


Robin Norman 


If you have a ZX81, or are thinking of 
buying one, this book will tell you all 
need to know to get the best from it. 


0 408 01101 7 160 pages 

£3.95 


The ZX81 Basic book covers the 
r Basic IK version, the additional 
r facilities offered by the 16 K 
' expansion RAM and how to use the 
r Sinclair ZX printer. There are 14 
r original programs for you to run on 
r the machine(for1Kand 16K versions), 

1 and for those confused by computer 
1 jargon (and who isn’t?) there is 
1 a glossary of technical terms. 

1 Robin Norman assumes no initial 
J knowledge of computing and his 
1 undemanding writing style is a 
1 perfect beginner’s introduction. 

r 0 408 001178 5 
' 176 pages 


Q&A on 
Personal 
Computing 

Peter Lafferty 


This book will help anyone who 
wishes to learn about personal 
computers and the uses to which 
they can be put. It describes the 
development of the personal 
computer, explains its operation and 
outlines the principles of 
programming. A chapter on 
applications surveys the many uses 
of these remarkable machines. 

0 408 00555 6 96 pages 


Coming shortly... 

26 BASIC Programs 
for your Micro 

Derrick Dairies 

Here is a collection of 26 new and varied games 
programs, from spelling tests to submarine¬ 
hunting. They are graded from the most 
elementary, usable on the simplest home 
computer, to longer and more complex programs 
suitable for more advanced machines. 

Derrick Daines has written the games in an easy 
subset of BASIC so that the reader will have no 
difficulty in translating them for any microcomputer. 
Each program is described in a lively and informative 
style, with a list of variables and memory size required, 
plus a program listing and sample run. 

The book is ideal for hobbyists since it helps improve 
techniques for writing successful programs whilst 
also providing plenty of entertainment. 


£1.95 


ORDER NOW- from your local bookseller 


of B, 




(CVG. 2/82) 


In case of difficulty send cash 
with order to Patricia Davies, 
Marketing Manager at the 
address shown 


M 


_ r fh$ 


ewnes Technical Books 

Borough Green,Sevenoaks, Kent TN15 8PH 



A GREAT NEW GAME FROM 



for ZX81, ZX80, TRS80, VIDEO GENIE 

«JUST LOOK AT THESE FEATURES)) 

★4 Divisions ★ Promotion & Relegation ★ 

★F.A. Cup ★ Full League Tables★ 

★Transfer Market (Buy and Sell Players)^ 

*Pick your Team for each Match (but watch out for Injuries!)* 
★As many Seasons as you like^ 

★7 levels of Play (from Beginner to Genius!)^ 
^Managerial Rating (tells you how good you REALLY are!)^ 
★Save Game Facility (continue again another time)^ 

—All this and much much more packed tightly into 16K RAM — 


“IF YOU LIKE FOOTBALL 

YOU'LL LOVE THIS GAME" 


HARDWARE REQUIRED:— 


ZX81/ 

ZX80 

TRS80/ 

Video Genie 

8K ROM 
16K RAM 

LEVEL II 
16K RAM 


TO ORDER SEND CHEQUE/PO 
FOR £9.95 MADE PAYABLE TO 
ADDICTIVE GAMES at 
267B, Conniburrow Boulevard, 
MILTON KEYNES, 

MK14 7AF 

(Please allow 28 days for Delivery) 

■-* 



... is a stylish and 
ergonomic plinth for the ZX81. It raises and 

tiits the TV to avoid eyestrain, holds the 16KRAM 
in place and hides the wiring and power supply. 
This very professional unit costs £15, a built-in 
powerswitch is £3, plus postage at £1.50, inc.VAT. 


Peter Furlong Products, 125Catford Hill, London SE6 4PR. 
Callers by appointment, please.Tel 016907799.Visa, Access. 


82 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 
























SUPERMARKET 



torials each have the property 
that they contain the digits 0-9 in 
order. 


The factorial of a number is 
given by the formula n fac¬ 
torial (denoted as n!) = n x 
(n-1) x . . . x2xl 
Example 3! = 3x2x1 = 6 

4! = 4x3x2xl = 24 
What are the lowest 3 consecu¬ 
tive whole numbers whose fac- 


• Bottles of champagne go to G. 
Kitchen of Deepcar, Sheffield 
and E. M. Weston of Tadley, 
Hants, winners of December 
issue's Mind Routines and Nev- 
era Crossword puzzles. More 
champagne is up for grabs this 
issue. 




ACROSS 


6. Wiring the equipment again 
while saving the program (9) 

8. Character lost from the front 
of the tape is fishy (3) 

9. Video version of Escape from 
Colditz? (5,8) 

11. Graduate with such com¬ 
pany — Margaret Thatcher, 
49 from Rome and the Queen 
proves more efficient than an 
interpreter (5,8) 

15. Fantastic dream gave tune 
played on a micro (9,4) 

16. Fashionable point to play a 
fruit machine (3) 

17. Theatrical second-hand 
computer (3,3,3) 


2. CDC operating system with 
potential (5) 

3. True comic romp around the 
hardware (13) 

4. Deletion of Basic comment 
on a cricket ground (7) 

5. Guy Fawkes peripheral (7) 

7. Gas Panels turned around 

might cover the front of an 
arcade machine (5,4) 

10. Failsafe not needed by video 
circus player (6,3) 

11. Criminal prelude to 9 (5,2) 

12. Working hard in confining a 
peripheral to a dedicated 
task (7) 

13. A quick burst of fire in 
reprisal — volley from the 
asteroid player (5) 

14. Writer on the church. 10 of 
them are usually required to 
play 9 (5) 



COMPUTER CHESS 
by 

MAIL ORDER 

EXTRA LOW PRICES! 


Hand held Chess Traveller (complete 
with board men etc.) £34.75 

* Boris Diplomat II (lightweight portable 

— ideal for beginners and travel) £43.50 
Mini Chess Master "1" (low priced port¬ 
able sensory) £75.00 

Challenger Mini Sensory (the mini ver¬ 
sion of the Challenger Sensory — ideal 
for travel) £43.50 

* Challenger "7" (ideal all-round Chess 

Computer) £63.50 

* Challenger Sensory "8" (sensory 

chess to club standard) £95.00 

Challenger Sensory Champion Fastest 
and strongest game yet produced by 
Fidelity Electronics. Winner of the World 
Microcomputer Championships. Out¬ 
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* Murphy Encore (top level chess with 

fast play) £128.50 

* Great Game Machine (mainframe — 

games centre for games cartridges, 
including Murphy Chess, Borchek 
Draughts, Las Vegas Blackjack, Revers 
etc.) £147.00 

T COMPUTER GAMES 

I Backgammon Challenger £69 50 a 
Omar III Backgammon £57 50 | 

j Advanced Bridge Challenger £174 00 


COMPUTERS 

Texas T199/4 16K Computer which plugs 
direct into any TV for full colour — ideal 
learning aid for every member of the 
family including pre-school children. 
Ideal for learning chess. It will give you a 
good game or you can program your 
own or other Masters on to cassette/ 
floppy disc. Many pre-programmed 
games modules available — just plug-in 
and play. _ £250.00 


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22 Cowper Street 
London EC2 


PET ACCESSORIES 

VERBATIM double-density 40-track .£18.00 

VERBATIM double-density 77-track .£25.00 

ACCUTRACK double-density 40-track .£16.00 

Ribbons for CBM 3022/Epson TX80 .3 for £1.80 

Cartridge for CBM 4022/Epson MX80 .£10.00 

Refill for above .3 for £9.00 

Lockable disk boxes (hold 90 disks) .£25.00 

Lockable disk boxes (hold 40 disks) .£17.50 

Disk Library cases (hold 10 disks) .£2.75 

Disk storage pages (hold 2 disks) .£0.50 

Dustcover for small screen PET/CBM .£4.50 

Dust cover for large screen PET/CBM .£5.75 

Dustcover for 3022/4022/3040/4040/8050 .£3.50 

PET to IEEE 2-metre cable .£32.00 

IEEE to IEEE 2-metre cable .£32.00 

Perspex green screen for PET .£7.50 

As above, for large screen models .£12.50 

Cassette cleaner & demagnetiser .£7.50 

Basic 4.0 Commodore Users Manual .£5.00 

PETMASTER SUPERCHIP (state model) .£45.00 

MIKR0 ASSEMBLER chip (state model) .£50.00 


TOP PET GAMES 

SPACE DEBRIS, GIDDY GHOULS 8k .each £8.00 

SUPER GL00PER, METEORITES 8k .each£8.00 

ASTEROIDS, SPACE RESCUE 8k .each £8.00 

HITCH-HIKERS GUIDE TO THE GALAXY 32k .£16.00 

CRACKS OF DOOM (Lord of the Rings) 32k .£16.00 

HALLS OF DEATH 16k .£14.00 


ADD 15% VAT TO ALL PRICES - POST FREE IN UK 


SUPERS0FT 

First Floor, 10-14 Canning Road, Wealdstone, 
Flarrow, Middlesex, HA3 7SJ, England 
Telephone: 01-861 1166 


DOWN 

1. Machine failure loses a life 
in Grand Prix (5) 










































































































































SUPERMARKET 


ZX81-1K starter pack 

Twelve programs on cassette writ¬ 
ten for the new user to demonstrate 
the versatility of the ZX81. Seven 
exciting moving graphic games 
including, Invaders, Tank-Shoot, 
Subsearch and Road Race: A sound 
generation program is also included. 

Orders despatched on high quality cas¬ 
sette by return, £3.90 with order to: 

docoryjrd^iion v**<**'*«*™ 

i Tamworth. Staffs. B77 2L 


ZX8116k RAM 

Cassette Games to Test Your Skill 
and Tactics 

NASTY INVADERS £4.95 

A 20min plus Action-Packed Game. You are on 
duty in the Defence Radar Centre. An invasion 
starts. Your task is to prevent the Enemy from 
landing. But you have problems: not only do you 
have to stop the Invaders making repairs to their 
craft, but there could be personnel trouble too! 
Good control is rewarded, but errors are penal¬ 
ised. Don't despair — Rank Has Its Privileges!! 

NASTY MOUNTAIN £4.95 

VERY NASTY MOUNTAIN £6.95 

You are leading an expedition and come to an 
impassable mountain range. It looks like a long 
detour until an old goat-herd announces that 
there is an opening in the rocks into which the 
occasional animal wanders, but they never re¬ 
appear . . . See if you can solve the mysteries of 
Nasty Mountain and continue on your travels! 
Whether you succeed or fail, you can always try 
again — but somehow it's not quite the same as 
before!! 

Very Nasty Game: an advanced version of the 
Nasty Mountain Game with 16 levels of play. 
Practice Makes Perfect — but the more mysteries 
you solve, the more your tactics are tested!! 

* all programs are recorded twice 

* check-loaded before despatch 

* user program test facility 

* prices include VAT and P&P 

Cheques/P.O.s to: GILTROLE LTD., DEPT. CVG, 
P.O. BOX 50, RUGBY, WARKS. CV21 4DH. 


DO YOU PLAY 
TV GAMES? 

It could cost anything up to £1000 to own 
your own comprehensive library of car¬ 
tridges for your TV games console. 

We have such a comprehensive library for 
most systems, and are prepared to offer 
this facility to you at low daily rentals, 
with the option of purchasing at Special 
Discount Prices those cartridges which 
give you most pleasure. 

For further details please send a large 
S.A.E. to E&E ENTERPRISES, P.O. BOX 8, 
SALTASH, CORNWALL PL12 6 YU. 


C 80 Nelson Computer Services Ltd 

SHARP MZ 80K MZ 80B 

'y^.cuulfrnemajt pQ 3201 

Personal and 
Business 
Computers 

Special Offer 
MZ 80K cash and carry 
Price £399 Inc. VAT. 

Delivery £6.00 Inc. VAT. _ 

Computers, Peripherals, Software Maintenance 
on Sharp, Apple, etc. Call in for a demonstration 
in our showroom. 

ROSSENDALE 229125 

(STD CODE 0706) TELEX 635615 
St Johns Court, Bacup Road 
Rawtenstall, Lancs BB4 7PA 




ADVENTURE A type of game in 
which the player has to take a 
character role and retrieve a 
number of treasures or objects by 
a trial and error process giving 
instructions to the computer. The 
"hero" (or player) encounters a 
variety of hazards often taking 
the form of dangerous monsters, 
wizards and animals. Some 
adventure games are so complex 
that they take weeks, or months, 
to solve. 

ALGORITHM A process or set of 
rules to carry out a task or solve 
a mathematical problem. 

ARRAY A series of items (data or 
information) arranged to form a 
meaningful pattern. 

ARROW KEYS The keys on a 
computer keyboard marked with 
arrows. Used for moving the cur¬ 
sor across, or up and down the 
V.D.U. screen. 

ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE A lan¬ 
guage built up with memory 
codes designed to make prog¬ 
ramming easier. 

BASIC The most widespread 
computer language, which is 
one of the easiest to learn and is 
used on all microcomputers. 

BUG A slang term given to a 
mistake in a computer program 
which prevents it from working. 
It can refer to a mechanical, 
electrical or electronic defect in 
a computer. 

CHIP A tiny piece of silicon 
which holds all the components 
that make up a microprocessor. 
CHR$ A Basic function which 
codes a computer's graphic 
symbols. It is followed by a 
number in brackets, e.g. CHR$ 
(68), which is the coded number 
of the symbol you want the com¬ 
puter to produce. 

COMPUTER LANGUAGES Lan¬ 
guages are used to make the 
computer perform operations. 
They consist of computer instruc¬ 
tions or commands. There are 
different types of languages for 


carrying out different tasks, e.g. 
business, scientific. 

DEBUG The process of locating 
and correcting errors in a compu¬ 
ter program. 

DEDICATED CHIP A chip (micro¬ 
processor) which has been spe¬ 
cially programmed to perform a 
single or special group of 
applicatons, e.g. computer 
games. ROMs are usually the 
means by which dedicated chips 
are developed. 

DISC A magnetic storage device. 
It can be either a hard or floppy 
disc. Hard discs can usually 
store more information than 
floppy discs and are used with 
mainframe computers. 

DISC DRIVE A unit which is con¬ 
nected to the computer used for 
loading the information stored 
on discs into the computer. 

DOLLAR SIGN See "String" 
FIRMWARE A program which is 
stored in a permanent ROM. 
GOSUB A Basic command 
instructing the computer to go to 
a subroutine in a computer prog¬ 
ram. 

GRAPHICS The name given to 
pictorial representation of data 
such as plotted graphs, 
engineering drawing and, of 
course, computer games. 

HARDWARE The general term 
given to all pieces of electronic 
and mechanical devices which 
make up a computer system, i.e. 
the actual machines. 

HIGH RESOLUTION GRAPHICS 
A method of using Basic com¬ 
mands to move a drawing head 
to any position on the screen and 
drawing a line between two 
specified points. This facility is 
available on several makes of 
microcomputer. 

INPUT Information/data which is 
fed into the computer. 

INTEGER A number which does 
not contain a decimal point, i.e. 
a whole number. 

K Abbreviation for Kilobyte. 


84 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 





















SUPERMARKET 


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A beginner's guide to plain jargon 


KILOBYTE A measurement of 
memory capacity. 1024 bytes of 
memory. So 8K is equivalent to 
8192 bytes. 

LANGUAGE See "Computer 
Language". 

L.C.D. (Liquid Crystal Display) A 

display containing liquid cryst¬ 
als which light up when electric¬ 
ity touches them. Used in cal¬ 
culators and watches. 

L.E.D. (Light Emitting Diode) 

Provides a simple display and 
consists of an electron tube 
which lights up when electricity 
is passed through it. Used as an 
alternative to liquid crystal. 

LINE NUMBER Refers to the 
number assigned to a line or row 
of characters contained in a 
computer program. 

LOAD Putting information from 
auxiliary storage into internal 
storage of a computer. It can be 
either a complete program or 
any data. When you load a prog¬ 
ram you put the contents of the 
program into the computer's 
memory from storage either on a 
disc or a cassette. 

LOOP A Basic function referring 
to the repeated execution of a 
series of instructions for a fixed 
number of times. 

MACHINE CODE The term used 
to refer to symbols or numbers 
assigned to parts of a machine. 
It is the same as operation code 
which is the symbol telling the 
computer which operation to per¬ 
form. When a game is written in 
machine code it makes every¬ 
thing move much more quickly. 

MAINFRAME COMPUTER The 

jargon word used to describe a 
very large computer. 

MICROCOMPUTER A tiny com¬ 
puter (as the name suggests) 
consisting of hardware and 
software. The main processing 
blocks are made of semiconduc¬ 
tor integrated circuits. 

MICROPROCESSOR Another 
name for a chip. 


NUMBER CRUNCHING The 

operation in computing which 
carries out the arithmetic and 
logical processes which informa¬ 
tion has to go through. 

PEEK A statement used in Basic 
which allows you to read the 
contents of a specified memory 
address. 

PERIPHERAL INTERFACE 
ADAPTOR (P.I.A.) An adaptor 
which is incorporated in the chip 
and makes peripheral equip¬ 
ment interfacing easier. 

PERIPHERALS Equipment which 
is used with a computer, e.g. 
printers V.D.U.s and disc drives. 
POKE An instruction used in 
most versions of Basic allowing 
you to store integers in a specific 
place in memory. 

R.A.M. (Random Access Memory) 

This is a memory chip which you 
can load programs and data to 
and from. 

RANDOM NUMBER A number 
selected at random from an 
ordered set of numbers. 

R.O.M. (Read Only Memory) A 

memory chip which can only be 
read from and not written into. 

ROUTINE A set of coded compu¬ 
ter instructions used for a par¬ 
ticular function in a program. 

SOFTWARE Another name for 
computer programs. It can also 
refer to computer documenta¬ 
tion. 

STATEMENT An instruction in a 
computer program. 

STRING A connected sequence 
of characters, words or other 
elements usually symbolised 
with the (dollar) sign. 

SUBROUTINE A computer prog¬ 
ram routine that is translated 
separately. 

SYNTAX The name used to refer 
to sentence structure rules of a 
programming language. 

USER PORT The entry channel to 
which a data set (set of similar 
data) is attached. 


BRIDGE SOFTWARE 
QUALITY SOFTWARE 

FOR YOUR 


8^8 


zzzzz 


A 


8 8 


VI 


8 88 8 H 1 11 


IK GAMES (Duck Shoot, Moonlander, Hangman, Crossword, 

Letter Square). Cassette and instructions .£3.00 

16K GALAXY INVADERS in machine code. Cassette and instruc¬ 
tions (16k RAM pack needed) .£2.50 

Also Ik STATISTICS (£3.50), Ik GRAPHICS (£3.00) 

16k MULTIGRAPHICS (£3.50) 

Send s.a.e. for details. ★ Mail order only ir 

BRIDGE SOFTWARE (G) 

36 FERNWOOO, MARPLE BRIDGE 
STOCKPORT, CHESHIRE SK6 5BE 


CASSETTE ONE 

PROGRAMS FOR ZX81 

"I had your Invaders/React cassette... I was 
delighted with this first cassette" 

—P. Rubython, London NW10 
"Thanks for your Cassette One you sent me — 
some excellent games at a very cheap price!" 

—P. Rushton, Leeds 
"I have been intending to write to you for some 
days to say how much I enjoy the games on 
Cassette One' which you supplied me with earlier 
this month. Please let... into the secret of your 
first time load every time!" —E.H., London SW4 

CASSETTE ONE SIDE ONE IK MACHINE 
CODE PROGRAMS 

React, Invaders, Phantom aliens. Maze of 
Death, Planet lander, Bug splat, Bouncing 
letters 

CASSETTE ONE SIDE ONE IK BASIC 
PROGRAMS 

I Ching, Mastermind, Basic hangman, 
Robots 

CASSETTE ONE SIDE TWO has large screen 
versions of Invaders and Maze of Death, 
ready for when you get 16K. (Previous cus¬ 
tomers who did not get the large screen 
versions can get free upgrade instructions 
by sending me an sae.) 

CASSETTE ONE costs £3.80 from Michael 
Orwin, 26 Brownlow Rd., Willesden, Lon¬ 
don NW10 9QL. 


CROYDON 

COMPUTER CENTRE 

29a Bridgstock Road, 
Thornton Heath, 
Surrey CR4 7JJ 

▼ 

Everything for the 
micro-computer user 

Phone 01-689-1280 for 
free catalogue 


TRS80and 
GENIE Owners 


I Still Paying High Software Prices? 

You should be taking 

CLOAD MAGAZINE 

America’s monthly cassette of at least 
6 programs. 

Cload caters for all tastes; Arcade Games, 
Adventures, Utilities, Tutorials and even 
Business programs. Over 5,000 copies sold 
each month. 

Trial cassette £4.95 
6 month subscription £25.00 
12 month subscription £47.50 
Over 40 back issues available. 

Send for lists from the sole agents in the U.K. 
MICRODEAL, Deal House, Luxulyan, 
Bodmin, Cornwall. Tel: 0726 850821 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 85 














SUPERMARKET 


TRS80 Modetel+m 
and VIDEO GENIE 




Not likely! It's too slow. You've tried writing in 
BASIC and you know the results are rarely 
realistic or enjoyable. 

You need a compiler 

ACCEL or ACCEL2 will convert your BASIC 
programs to machine code. Spectacular speed-ups 
are possible - 20 or 30 times for games 
constrained by display- or logic. Write for details 

ACCEL Level 2 BASIC only £19.95 

ACCEL2 Full DISK BASIC £39.95 


PO Box 39, Eastleigh, Hants, SQ55WQ 


ZX 81 GAMES 

HIGH QUALITY, 

LOW COST SOFTWARE 
(ABSOLUTELY NO RUBBISH) 
GAMESTAPE 1, for IK, only £2.95 
10 Games incl. Asteroids, UFO, etc 
GAMESTAPE 2, for 16K, only £3.95 
Starfighter, Pyramid, Artist. 
GAMESTAPE 3, for 16K, only £4.95 
Catacombs... A Graphics 
Adventure. 

GAMESTAPE 4, for 16K, only £4.95 
3D Monster Maze ... Unbelievable 
Graphics. 

Cheque/P.O.s to 
J.K. GREYE SOFTWARE, 

16 PARK ST., BATH, AVON BA1 2TE. 


*BIG EARS *Vo. 


SPEECH 
INPUT 
FOR ANY 
COMPUTER 



Hugely successful Speech Recognition System, 
complete with microphone, software and full instructions. 


BUILT TESTED & GUARANTEED ONLY £49| 

PLEASE STATE COMPUTER: UK101, SUPERBOARD, NASCOM2, 
ZX80/81, PET, TRS80, MZ80K, APPLE II 


ZX80 ZX81 


MUSIC SYNTHESISER 
+ 16 LINE CONTROL PORT 





Play 3-part music, sound effects, 
drums etc. Full control of attack, decay 
and frequency. Input/Output lines provide 
control and monitor facility for Home Security, Robot Control, 
Model Railway, etc. etc. Works with or without 16K RAM. 

Add keyboard to make a live performance polyphonic synthesiser! 
Full instructions/software included. n j q CO 

11 y.ou (Km 

£25.00 (built) 


AMAZING VALUE AT ONLY 


COLOUR MODULATOR 

RGB in, PAL/UHF out 

KIT £12 

BUILT £18 

UK101/NASCOM COLOUR GRAPHICS 

Inc. Modulator. Still the best selling system! 

KIT £45 

BUILT £60 

Please add VAT at 15% to all prices. 

Barclay/Access orders accepted by telephone 

\ A/ll 1 IZMX/1 Dower House, Billericay Road, iluiUrtMl 

Y , , | ■ A r— .-r- Herongate, Brentwood, 

CD 1 l _IAH 1 Essex CM13 3SD 

SYSTEIV1S Ltd Telephone: Brentwood (0277) 810244 





A GUIDE TO THE LOW-COST COMPUTERS*' 


ACORN ATOM Cambridge based Acorn 
Computers manufactures the Atom 
machine which has a memory capacity of 
2K, but it can be upgraded to 12K. 

It must be plugged into a television and 
is available in either kit form or ready built 
As a kit it costs £120 for the 2K computer or 
£150 for the finished product. For a more 
powerful system, 12K, the price stands at 
£220 jin kit) and £250 completed. 

Acorn also makes the Systems 1,2, and 3 
which cost between £69 and £750. 


APPLE The Apple has a solid software 
base for both business and entertainment 
applications. The machine comes with a 
memory capacity ranging from 8-48K, You 
can buy joysticks and paddles to plug in for 
use with computer games. Colour graphics 
can be used with a colour television. 

The 48K machine costs £695 and is 
obtainable from Apple Computer U.K., for¬ 
merly Microsense which is based in Heme! 
Hempstead, Hertfordshire. 


ATARI 400/800 Most of the software for 
the Atari microcomputers are games or 
educational, with business applications 
only recently being introduced. 

The basic 400 with 16K RAM costs £340 
direct from Atari's UK distributors, 
via London-based Ingersol! Electronics. The 
32K version sells for £395. Peripherals for 
the machines, like disc drive units and 
cassette recorders can also be obtained 
from Ingersoll for £325 and £45 respectively. 
The 800 is expandable to 48K and the 16K 
machine sells for £645. 


BBC COMPUTER The computer adopted 
by the BBC to sell in conjunction with its 
forthcoming series is based on the Acorn 
Proton. The BBC has developed its own 
Basic to be used on the machine. Minimum 
memory is 16K RAM, maximum being 32K. 
Present plans for the machine are dual 
purpose, both business and games. 
Optional extras include joysticks, paddles, 
disc drives and a cassette for tape loading. 

Price is put at £235 for the 16K computer 
and £335 for the 32K version. 


It can be bought in kit form and off the 
shelf complete. The kit is £125 for IK RAM 
and £140 for the finished IK product. £225 
will secure an 8K kit. Nascoms are available 
from Warwick-based Lucas Logic. 


DAI This is a personal computer made by 
Data Applications for both business use 
and home entertainment. The U.K. system 
(it is made in Belgium) has 48K RAM as well 
as full colour and sound commands. Data 
Applications is based in Cirencester, 
Gloucestershire. The 48K system now 
costs £595. 


NEWBRAIN This is a hand-held computer 
unit which is at the low end of the price 
bracket. For 2K RAM you pay £159 upwards 
and it is expandable to 20K of memory. 
Hobbyists often opt for this machine 
because of its low cost and it is used for 
general business and for playing games. An 
expansion unit is available which supports 
floppy disc drives, a printer and a visual 
display unit. It is available from the Grundy 
Group. 


OHIO SCIENTIFIC Ohio Scientific (OSI) 
makes the Superboard which is aimed at the 
hobbyist market. Its memory capacity 
starts at 4K RAM and is expandable to 32K 
if you buy the add-on board. 

Other machines in this family include the 
Challenger 1 and 4. These are essentially, 
cased versions of Superboard. The Chal¬ 
lenger 4 is the cheapest of these at £575 
and includes colour and sound options. 


PET Made by Commodore Business 
Machines, the Pet ranges from 8K RAM to 
32K RAM. It is used mostly by small 
businesses for general applications but has 
a hefty hobbyist following. It is available 
from Commodore of Slough at a starting 
price of £460. Compatible peripherals are 
available for the Pet, including disc drives, 
cassettes for loading tapes and printers. 


SHARP MZ-80K Popular with both busi¬ 
ness and home users, the Sharp's memory 
capacity starts at 16K and has a top limit of 
48K. It comes with a monitor and a cassette 
recorder built onto the keyboard unit. Disk 
drives are also available. Manchester- 
based Sharp Electronics have a recom¬ 
mended retail price of £460 for the 48K unit. 


SHARP PC-1211 The smallest computer in 
the Sharp range. Sharp classifies it as a 
pocket computer and it is programmable in 
Basic. It also has a cassette interface for 
loading and costs upwards of £85. 


NASCOM There are two Nascoms avail¬ 
able at the moment, both can be used for 
business and games. The Nascom 2 is the 
more powerful of the two with 8K RAM and 
with a Basic interpreter. 


SINCLAIR There are two types of Sinclair's 
microcomputer available for under £100. 
Sinclair really brought the microcomputer 
into the home. The machines are ideal for 
learning the rudiments of computing but 
are limiting graphically. The ZX80 has IK of 
memory and is expandable up to 8K, but is 
no longer in production. The ZX81 sells for 
£49.95 for IK in kit form or £69.95 ready 
assembled. The 16K RAM packs cost 
£49.95. 


86 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 
























SUPERMARKET 



RS j AIL ABLE IN THE UK 


TANGERINE Tangerine Computer Systems 
produce the Microtan 65, a microcomputer 
for games and personal use, like household 
accounts. It comes in kit form and is 
expandable from an initial IK memory up to 
48K of RAM. The Microtan 65 costs £79.35 
for the IK kit, or £90.85 assembled. 
Tangerine is based in Ely, Cambridgeshire. 


SORCERER The Exidy Sorcerer is a home 
computer with a sizeable games following 
but it is one of the more expensive of the 
microcomputers, costing upwards of £749. 
Memory amount ranges from 48K to 55K 
and there is a plug-in ROM pack for extra 
capacity. Disc drives and visual display unit 
are an additional cost. Sorcerer's can be 
obtained from a Cornish firm, Liveport of St 
Ives. 


TI-99/4AThis computer has recently been 
re-launched by Texas Instruments. It con¬ 
sists of a separate keyboard with graphics 
facilities in full colour and now plugs in to a 
U.K. television. Software available for it 
from Texas Instruments is mostly business 
and educational but the firm has recently 
introduced a bundle of games to run on the 
computer. It has 16K RAM and uses tapes, 
discs or plug-in games cartridges. You can 
buy one of these from Bedford-based T.L 
for £299 or from your local dealers. 


TANDY TRS-80 Tandy's TRS-80 Model 1 is 
a machine which is often used for games 
and is well-supplied with software for both 
entertainment and business applications. 
Its memory capacity goes from 4K to 16K 
but there is an expansion unit available 
upgrading it to 48K if you want the extra 
memory. The Model 1 is the cheapest of 
the Tandy range. 

The Model 1 costs £459 but comes 
complete with a monitor to use as a V.D.U. 
and a cassette. The Model III is an integral 
unit made up of a keyboard, 12" screen and 
two slots for 5£" discs. It costs from £499. 


VIC-20 The VIC is the much-publicised 
baby of the range of microcomputers from 
Commodore of Slough. At £185 it is one of 
the cheapest. Deliveries to dealers have 
just started. The VIC has full colour graph¬ 
ics on a colour T.V. and there are joysticks 
available. Although Commodore are plug¬ 
ging the business use of the machine it is 
tipped to be a hot games computer 
because of its colour graphics and low 
cost. 


VIDEO GENIE The Genie is made by 
E.A.C.A. and is a popular games machine. It 
is compatible with the Tandy TRS-80 Model 
1. With 16K to 48K RAM there are disc 
drives available. The basic unit costs from 
£369 and is available from Lowe Electronics 
of Matlock in Derbyshire. 


GENIE 1 The replacement computer for the 
Video Genie is now available. The Genie 1, 
is an upgraded version of the Video Genie 
and has full upper and lower case, a 
machine language monitor, additional Basic, 
has a sound unit and is cassette based. It is 
being aimed at the serious hobbyist market 
and costs £229. A disc version is available, 
called the Genie II and sells for £310 for the 
unit, £199 for the expansion box needed, 
and £225 for each disc drive. 


TANDY TRS-80 COLOUR COMPUTER 

Tandy's latest addition to its range of 
computers is the Extended Basic Micro 
Colour Computer, (or TRS-80 Colour Com¬ 
puter for Short), it is available with either 
16 or 32K of memory and costs £449. 

The actual computer unit consists of a 
keyboard which can be plugged into any 
television set. It is aimed at both business 
and games users and Tandy has bought out 
a variety of instant loading games program 
packages for the machine. 

joysticks needed to play some of the 
games are extra and cost £17.95 a pair. The 
colour computer can be obtained from 
Tandy stores nationwide. 


U.K.101 This machine comes in either kit 
form or ready built with memory capacity of 
4K to 40K (with an expansion board). It 
contains television and cassette interfaces 
so you don't need a V.D.U. The U.K.101 is a 
popular computer for playing games and 
there is a lot of software around for it. The 
kit costs £149 for 4K, ready built it sells for 
£199. 


ADULT 


ONLY 


VIDEO CLUB! 


Ring: 0373 * 

day or evenings (cheap rate) 

830563 

or send coupon to: 

VIDEO CLUB 

|,DREWSTEAD RD., 

’ LONDON S.W.16 

Please send FREE details, I am over 18 

NAME. 

ADDRESS.. 


I PHOh 

■ Please r 


PHONE . 

pmember to fill in your telephone number 




JOYSTICK 


TAMARISK JOYSTICK 

£22.50 inclusive 

GAME EXTENSION SOCKET 

£6.50 inclusive. 

from TAMARISK DESIGN SERVICES 

290 Brooklands Rd, Manchester M23 
061-969 8729 


UK101 


PROGRAMS 
ON CASSETTE 


TAPE 1: Startrek (8K), Robot Chase (4K),,Maze 
(6K), Golf (4K), Space Invaders (4K), Chessboard 
(4K), Graphics (4K), Fourier Series (8K), Best fit 
Polynomial (4K), Hangman (8K), Docking a 
Space Ship (4K). 

TAPE 2. Adventure (8K), King (8K), Moon 
Landing (6K), Simultaneous Equations (4K), 
Gunfight (4K), Hexapawn (6K), Dogfight (4K), 

The Tower of Brahma (4K), Nim (4K), Life (8K), 
Mugwump (4K). 

TAPE 3: Real Time Startrek (8K), Mastermind 
(4K), Tank Battle (4K), Surround (4K), Integra¬ 
tion (8K), Biorhythm (4K), Asteroid Shoot (4K), 
Breakout (4K), Graph Plotter (6K), Graphic Aid 
(4K), Space War (4K). 

One tape £6.00 two for £11.50, three for £16.00. | 

Machine Code Programs: 

Space Invaders, Asteroids 
(9 speeds, 5 difficulty levels) 

Life (128x 128 board, 1.2sec per generation!) 

Assembler * 

£3.00 each, two for £5.00 
three for £7.00, all four for £8.00 
All programs are available for use with 
standard (48x16) or enhanced (48x32) 

V.D.U. display _ 


Mr M. WARD, 9 ST ANDREWS AVFNUF. 
CRF WE . CHESHIRE CW2 6JJ. 


ATARI 400 COMPUTER 16K PLUS TAPE RECOR¬ 
DER, LE STICK, STAR RAIDERS CARTRIDGE, 
SOFTWARE ON TAPE £345 O.N.O. 

PET 2001-8 PLUS SOUND GENERATOR, TOOL 
KIT, SUPERCHIP, LOTS OF SOFTWARE £300 
O.N.O. 

UK101 HARDWARE I/O PORT, MOTHER BOARD, 
RAMCARD, ROMCARD, P.O.A. 

Mr M Bywater, 170 Durham Road, St Nicholas, 
Stevenage, Herts. Stevenage 69612. 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 87 
























LOW COST ZX81 
MEMORY EXPANSION 
S4 MEMORY PACK 

£16 inc. vat 


COMPONENTS 


74LS 

133 at 28 pence 

7420 

18 pence 

74LS 

04 at 18 pence 

7425 

20 pence 

74LS 

107 at 32 pence 



74LS 

257 at 40 pence 

7427 

20 pence 

74LS 

374 at 77 pence 

7432 

20 pence 

74LS 

393 at 41 pence 

7474 

24 pence 

7405 

19 pence 

7486 

24 pence 

7408 

18 pence 

74153 

27 pence 

7410 

18 pence 

74165 

39 pence 


Increase your ZX81's memory to 4K. Runs most program¬ 
mes designed for 16K expansion at a fraction of the price. 

All prices include VAT and P & P 

CEEDATA Ltd 

Glebe House, Armfield Close, 

West Mosely Trading Estate, 

Surrey KT8 OUP 01-941 4889 


CREATE YOUR ZX81* GAMES IN 
MACHINE CODE. IT CAN GIVE YOU 

— Flicker Free Graphics 

— Faster Running Programs 

— Larger and more Complex Games 

— Faster Responses 

THE MCIS Z80 M/C LOAD/EDIT V3 
PROGRAM AIDS YOUR MACHINE 
CODE PROGRAMMING WITH 

— Hex Code Input 

— Decimal Augument Input 

— 3-Byte Break-Points (BP) 

(Vital for fast de-bugging) 

— Re-Enter Machine Code at BP 

— Automatic Insertion/Deletion VP's. 

— A, F, BC, DE, HL and PC Registers Reported at 
each BP 

— The Binary State of each Flag is Reported. 

Z80 M/C LOAD/EDIT V3 

Basic and Machine Code Listings Together with Flow 
Charts and Full Instructions — £7.80 (Inclusive) 

Cheques with order please to MICHAEL COX 
INFORMATION SERVICES, 62 HIGH ROAD, 
NORTH WEALD, ESSEX CM 16 6BY 

*We thank Sinclair Research Ltd for permission to use their 
product name. The Companies are in no other way related. 


THE 


BUFFER 

MICRO SHOP 

(NEXT TO STREATHAM STATION) 

★ ★ ★ 

NEW SOFTWARE SHOP EXCLUSIVELY FOR 

ZX81 

PROGRAMS, GAMES, "ADD/ONS" 

★ ★ ★ 

MOST OF THE MAIL ORDER ITEMS ADVERTISED IN 
THIS MAGAZINE AVAILABLE OVER THE COUNTER 

★ ★ ★ 

LOADING PROBLEMS? TRY OUR INTERFACE 
BUSINESS & TECHNICAL DATA HANDLING PROGS. 
PROPER KEYBOARDS; CONSOLES; VDUS 

★ ★ ★ 

374A STREATHAM HIGH ROAD, 
LONDON SW16 
Tel: 01-274 6674 

S.A.E. APPRECIATED FOR CATALOGUE 


AD INDEX 


Adda 41 

Addictive Games 82 

Algray Software 15 

Buffer Micro Shop 88 

Bug Byte 35 

Calisto 42 

Ceedata 88 

Chromasonic 21 

Compshop 90/91 

Computer 100 77 

Computer Plus 56 

Computers For All 69 

Computer Shack 17 

Computer Supermarket 2 
Control Technology 14 

DK'tronics 63 

Electronequip 56 

Essential Software Co 69 

Gemini 78 

Ibek 70 

Kansas City Systems 89 
Kuma 50 


Laskys 37/56 

Lowe Electronics 25 

Macronics 78 

Maplin Electronics 0BC 

Michael Cox 

Information Services 88 
Microgen 72 

Microstyle 10 

Molimerx 60 


Newnes Technical Books 82 
Peter Furlong Products 82 


Quicksilva 70 

Sharp Electronics (UK) 32 

Shiva Publishing 78 

Silica Shop 12 

Silicon Centre 70 

Silversoft 17 

Sinclair Research 

Ltd ^ 65/66/67 

Team 4 Software 77 

Video Services (Bromley) 14 

Woodland Software 17 


88 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 




























i 

1 

Can you save Middle Earth by rescuing Frodo 
from Shelob’s lair. .. ? 


Tolkien’s 

LORD OF THE RINGS 


Lord of the Rings is an entirely new type of game, combining 
a little of the principle of the ‘Adventure’ type of game, using 
words as spells, etc; a little of the ‘Quest’ principle of moving 
around the ‘rooms’; plus actual graphics showing the various 
levels, walls, doors, nasties and yourself, Frodo. 

The appeal of the game is that it combines skill and chance, 
so that though developing strategies are important, there is no 
guarantee that having learnt a strategy it will work twice! 

The game is an adaption of Tolkien’s book The Lord of the 
Rings’, spell words actually being taken from the book as are 
the characters. 

Tolkien enthusiasts will not need convincing of the necessity 
of saving Middle Earth by escaping from Shelob’s Lair; those 
without this background knowledge will have to play a few 
games before they become addicted! 

In your quest to cast the ring into the Crack of Doom to 


destroy its evil power you will travel a long and dangerous road. 
The Lair is on many levels, so you must find the stairs, and 
beware of the clever nasties, monsters and dwarfs which can 
detect you from a distance and rush for your gold, which you 
need to bribe. There are secret tunnels, monsters’ tombs and 
the like. 

During your travels you can meet Shelob herself, a Fiery 
Balrog, Lord of the Nazgul, a Hideous Hill-Troll Chief, a Numa- 
kil from the Far Harrad, Hissing Gollum, a Howling Warg, a 
Barrow-Wight and all those characters of the spell words. 

The game, though easy to actually play is complicated in 
itself with many and varied happenings along the way. But its 
advantage is that all the time you can see and manipulate 
yourself in eight different directions. 

Peter and Margaret Hutt have developed and produced a 
most absorbing, and certainly addictive, game . . . 

£9.50 


Or you can battle through the Enchanted Forest 
to rescue the Princess ... ? 

SWORDS AND SORCERY 


Swords and Sorcery sets you out on a quest to rescue the 
princess held by the wicked Necromancer, taking through 
many separate adventures and meeting many strange beings 
on the way to the castle — if you ever get there. 

This program is randomly based, so it is not the same old 
thing time after time. 

Off you go through the Old Forest with just a sword and a few 
provisions, and if you are lucky, assistance from a Dryad as 
well as counsel from the Great Oracle. 

If you meet up with the Nymph, hang on to her, as she is a 
great guide through the forest as well as helping to fight the 
dreaded Trolls. But be careful not to upset her as she can 
easily turn her magical power onto you with a curse. 

From time to time you will meet wolves, lizards and snakes. 

“Sometimes you will be bitten but other times you will get away. 

Food is most important to you, but you could be lucky in 
finding some in the forest and also be lucky in finding the magic 
talisman which will ward off the wicked Necromancer. 

The Satyrs are nasties, to be avoided, but the real nasty is 


the spider, for if you don’t run from him — and fast, it’s the end 
for you! 

The Dragon is most important, and you can either run or 
fight. But to get a decent fighting ability rating, to enable you to 
fight your way back after rescuing the Princess, you have to 
fight. 

Run from the Goblins, or you will be enslaved, to be sold or 
freed only on payment of a ransom. 

More baddies in the form of the Trolls, which come in two 
versions including the warrior trolls which are your big risk all 
the time, and an enchanted sword. 

All the way through are degrees of your ability, which is 
either diminished or increased depending on the action you are 
taking at the time. 

Eventually you could make it to the castle and even rescue 
the princess, but then you’ve guessed, you have to fight your 
way back again! 

It’s a fantastic game, which can be played over and over 
again, such is its variation, and so do not confuse it with others. 

£9.50 


These programs are entirely different from each other in play and format. Both full 16K for Video 
Cenie and TRS-80. The two for £17.50. 


Kansas 

Kansas Citv S 


Programs for the TRS-80 and Video Genie. All prices are Vat paid and post free. Same-day first 
class return post service. All software in stock and fully guaranteed as we are the actual 
publishers. Free catalogue upon request. 


Kansas City Systems, Unit 3, Sutton Springs Wood, Chesterfield, S44 5XF. Tel. 0246 850357 


COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 89 













THE NEW & 

EXCITING 

TRS80 
MODEL 
III 



48K £619 + vat 


The Radio Shack TRS-80™ Model III is a ROM-based 
computer system consisting of: 

• A 12-inch screen to display results and other information 

• A 65-key console keyboard for inputting programs and data 
to the Computer • A Z-80 Microprocessor, the "brains” of 
the system • A Real-Time Clock • Read Only Memory 
(ROM) containing the Model III BASIC Language (fully 
compatible with most Model I BASIC programs) •Random 
Access Memory (RAM) for storage of programs and data 
while the Computer is on (amount is expandable from "16K" 
to"48K", optional extra) • A Cassette Interface for long-term 
storage of programs and data (requires a separate cassette 
recorder, optional/extra) • A Printer Interface for hard-copy 
output of programs and data (requires a separate line printer, 
optional/extra) • Expansion area for upgrading to a disk- 
based system (optional/extra) •Expansion area for an RS- 
232-C serial communications interface (optional/extra) 

All these components are contained in a single moulded case, 
and all are powered via one power cord. 

Disc Drives Kit with 2x40 Track Drives - £599 +VAT 
Disc Drives Kit with 2x80 Track Drives - £729 4 -VAT 
Add £25 for Installation 



ACORN ATOM 


UNIQUE IN CONCEPT - 
THE HOME COMPUTER 
THAT GROWS AS YOU DO 


Fully Assembled £149 + VAT 


Special features include • Full Sized Keyboard • 
Assembler and Basic • Top Quality Moulded Case • High 
Resolution Colour Graphics • 6502 Microprocessor 


WE ARE NOW STOCKING THE 
APPLE II AT REDUCED PRICES 

AUTOSTART 

\ ^ EURO PLUS 



48K 

£599 

+ VAT 


Getting Started APPLE II is faster, smaller, and more 
powerful than its predecessors. And it's more fun to use too 
because of built-in features like: 

• BASIC — The Language that Makes Programming Fun 

• High-Resolution Graphics (in a 54,000-Point Array) for 
Finely-Detailed Displays. ©Sound Capability that Brings 
Programs to Life. • Hand Controls for Games and Other 
Human-Input Applications. ©Internal Memory Capacity of 
48K Bytes of RAM, 12K Bytes of ROM; for Big-System Per 
formance in a Small Package. • Eight Accessory Expansion 
Slots to let the System Grow With Your Needs. 

You don't need to be an expert to enjoy APPLE II. It is 
complete, ready-to-run computer. Just connect it to a video 
display and start using programs (or writing your own) the 
first day. You'll find that its tutorial manuals help you make 
your own personal problem solver. 


GET YOURSELF 
A NEW MX70 
PRINTER AND SAVE 
A FORTUNE 



only £249 


VAT 


APPLE DISC II 

3.3 Dos 



Disc with 
Controller 

£349 + VAT 

Additional Drives 

£299 + VAT 



• Powerful Disk Operating Software Supports up to 6 
drives • Name Access to Files for Ease of Use • BASIC 
Program Chaining to Link Software Together ©Random 
or Sequential File Access to Simplify Programming 

• Dynamic Disk Space Allocation for Efficient Storage 

• Individual File Write-Protection Eliminates Accidental 
File Alterations • Loads an 8K Byte Binary Image in 6.5 
sec. (1.2 sec. in Pascal) ©Storage Capacity of 116 
Kilobytes (143K Bytes with Pascal) on Standard 5 'A" 
Diskettes • Powered Directly From the APPLE (Up to 6 
Drives) for Convenience and High Reliability • Packaged 
in Heavy-Duty, Colour-Coordinated Steel Cabinet 

Colour Monitors for Apple - £295 + VAT 


\S^The 
PEDIGREE 
PETS 


RRP £795 
for 32K 


• 80 Column, • Upper Et 
lower case • Apple dot Graphics 

• Centronics Parallel • Uni directional 
TX80 - £249 + VAT 





ONLY 

£569 

+ VAT 


Very popular for home Et business use. 8K Microsoft Basic in 
ROM. 32K with new improved keyboard. 12" screen. 
Cassette Deck £55 extra 


CASIO VL TONE^j£&£31.25 VAT 


8032 

80 COLUMN PET 


1 1 1 1 1 1 « 1 IS 

IT I I III I I II I I 


It's a new kind of musical instrument. A computer controlled 
synthesiser that helps you create, play and arrange composi¬ 
tions that normally take years of musical training. 


TV GAME BREAK OUT 


Has got to be one of the 
world's greatest TV games. 
You really get hooked. As 
featured in ETI. Has also 4 
other pinball gamesland lots 
of options. Good kit for 
up-grading old amusement 
games. 


MINI KIT - PCB, sound Et vision modulator, memory chip 
and de code chip. Very simple to construct. £14.90 + VAT 
OR PCB £2.90 MAIN LSI £8.50 Both plus VAT 




TANTEL 


ONLY 

£169 

+ VAT 


Demonstation available 
at our showroom 


PRESTEL BY TANTEL The greatest thing since television Et 
telephones. Communications at your fingertips for business 
Et home. 180,000 pages of up-to-date information on travel, 
news, investment, holidays, hotels etc etc. Ask Prestel a 
question and you have your answer in seconds in full colour 
on your own TV. Only requires a telephone jack socket 
available from the PO. 



HITACHI 
PROFESSIONAL 
MONITORS 


- £429 £99.95 

- £499 £149 


• Reliability Solid state circuitry using an 1C and silicon 
transistors ensures high reliability. • 500 lines horizontal 
resolution Horizontal resolution in excess of 500 lines is 
achieved in picture center. • Stable picture Even played 
back pictures of VTR can be displayed without jittering. 

• Looping video input Video input can be looped through 
with built-in termination switch. • External sync opera¬ 
tion (available as option for U and C types) • Compact 
construction Two monitors are mountable side by side in a 

standard 19-inch rack. 


CENTRONICS 737 
DOT MATRIX 
PRINTER 


only £369 VAT 

including cables 


Standard Features 

• 80 CPS Proportional 
Spaced Mode ©50 CPS — 
Monospaced Mode ©Proportional Spacing, Plus 10 CPI 
and 16.7 CPI • N x 9 (Proportional) or 7 x 8 (Monospaced) 
Dot Matrix ©7x8 Dot Matrix ©3 Way Paper Handling 
System ©96 Character ASCII plus 6 European character 
sets • Microprocessor Electronics • Expanded Print • Right 
Margin Justification • Print Underlining ©9-Wire Free Flight 
Print Head • Bidirectional Stepper Motor Paper Drive • Full 
One Line Buffer ©21-LPM With 80 Columns Printed ©58 
LPM With 20 Columns Printed ©6 Lines Per inch Vertical 
Spacing ©Paper Tear Bar ©Centronic Colours and Logo 


ONLY £825 + VAT 


The reliable value for money 
system with after sales support, 
instruction and training facilities 
and a wide range of 
programmes. 


MEMORY UPGRADES 

16K (8x4116) £15.90 + vat 

4K Compukit (8 x 2114) £15.90 + vat 


COMMODORE 

VIC-20 


16 foreground colours 
• 8 background colours 

• Real typewriter keyboard with full graphics 

• Music in three voices and three octaves 

• Language and sound effects 


THE VIDEO GENIE SYSTEM 

Ideal for small businesses, schools, colleges, homes, etc. 
Suitable for the experienced, inexperienced, hobbyist, 
teacher, etc. 

EG3000 
Series 



MICROLINE 80 


£299 4 VAT 


• 80 cps Uni-directional • Small size: 342 (W) x 254 (D) x 
108 (H) mm. • 160 Characters, 96 ASCII and 64 graphics ©3 
Character sizes: 40, 80 or 132 chars/line • Friction 
and Pin Feed • Low noise: 65 dB • Low weight: 6.5 kg 

MICROLINE 82 £449+vat 


• 80 cps Bi-directional logic seeking ©Small size: 360 (W) 
x 328(D) x 130(H) mm. • 160 characters, 96 ASCII and 64 
graphics, with 10 National character-set Variants. ©4 
Character sizes: 40, 66, 80 or 132 chars/line. ©Built-in 
parallel and serial interfaces. • Friction and Pin Feed 

• Low noise: 65dB • Low weight: 8kg 

MICROLINE 83 £779 + vat 

• 120 cps bi-directional logic seeking • 136 column printing 
on up to 15in forms ©Small size: 512 (W) x 328 (D) x 130 
(H) mm. • 160 characters, 96 ASCII and 64 graphics with 10 
National character-set variants ©3 Character spacings: 5, 10 
and 16.5 Chars/in. ©Built-in parallel and serial Interfaces 

• Friction and Pin Feed ©Low noise 65dB ©Low 
weight: 13 kg 


• 16K user RAM 
plus extended 12K Microsoft 
BASIC in ROM ©Fully TRS-80 Level II 
software compatible • Huge 

range of software already available ©Self contained, PSU, 
UHF modulator, and cassette ©Simply plugs into video 
monitor or UHF TV ©Full expansion to disks and printer 

• Absolutely complete — just fit into mains plug. 

The Video Genie is a complete computer system, requiring 
only connection to a domestic 625 line TV set to be fully 
operational; or if required a video monitor can be connected 
to provide the best quality display. 51 key typewriter style 
keyboard, which features a 10 key rollover. Supplied with 
the following accessories:- ©BASIC demonstration tape; 

• Video lead; ©Second cassetee lead; ©Users manual; 

• BASIC manual; • Beginners programming manual. Write 
useful programs in the BASIC computer language yourself. 


VIDEO GENIE 
EXPANSION BOX 


Complete with RS232 interface and floppy d 
controller. O memory. £225 + VAT 



Memory expansion card (S100) 16K £110 32K £159 + VAT 


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90 COMPUTER & VIDEO GAMES 


IF IT iAIAQIU'T CHD TUC l nii/coT nm^ro 


























































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YOUR ZX80 IS 
NOW NO LONGER 
REDUNDANT 

Upgrade your ZX80 to the full animated graphics of 
the ZX81. (No screen flicker). 

FOR ONLY £12.95 + VAT IN KIT FORM 
Works only in conjunction with NEW 8K ROM from 
Sinclair (Not Included). 

ZX81 part-exchanges accepted- 
GOOD PRICES OFFERED 



ATARI CARTRIDGES 
INSTOCK Phone,or 

availability 


COMP PRO MIXER 


•••••« 

• ••••• 

• • • • • • ) | 

(*!«.* ; 

■it:M M'l 


Professional 
audio mixer 
that you can 
build yourself 
and save 
over £100. 

Only 

£99.90 

| plus VAT for 
complete kit. 



EUROPE'S FASTEST SELLING ONE BOARD COMPUTER 

rOMPUKIT UK101 



★ 6502 based system - best value for 
money on the market. ★ Powerful 8K 
Basic — Fastest around ★ Full Qwerty 
Keyboard ★ IK RAM Expandable to 8K 
on board. ★ Power supply and RF 
Modulator on board. ★ No Extras 
needed — Plug-in and go ★ Kansas City 
Tape Interface on board. ★Free 
Sampler Tape including powerful 
Dissassembler and Monitor with each 
Kit. ★ If you want to learn about 
Micros, but didn't know which machine 
to buy then this is the machine for you. 

NEW MONITOR IN ROM — available separately at £7.90 + VAT. 

Improved Basic function - revised GARBAGE routine Allows correct use of STRING ARRAYS £4.90 \ f 


KIT ONLY £99.95 


iSE? 

apsSSr 


VAT 


Fully Assembled — £149 f VAT 


This chip can be sold separately to existing Compukit and Super board users. 


f VAT 



FOR THE COMPUKIT - Assembler Editor £14.90 

GAME PACKS - 1). Four Games £5.00 2). Four Games £5.00 3). Three Games 8K only £5.00 

Super Space Invaders (8K) £6.50 Chequers £3.00 Realtime Clock £3.00 
Case for Compukit £29.50 40 pin Expansion Jumper Cable £8.50 All Prices exclusive VAT 


TTL SALE 


74LS00 

£0.10 

74LS86 

£0.30 

74LS04 

£0.10 

74LS93 

£0.50 

74LS05 

£0.15 

74LS157 

£0.60 

74LS10 

£0.15 

74LS165 

£0.90 

74LS32 

£0.20 

74LS365 

£0.40 

74LS74 

£0.25 

74LS373 

£1.20 

Low Profile Sockets 



Minimum Order — £5 
Z80 

6502 £4.90 

ACIA 6850 £1.90 
OP-AMP 
CA3130 £0.45 

REG. 

7805 5V £0.75 


14 PIN £0.05 
16 PIN £0.06 


18 PIN £0.10 
20 PIN £0.15 


24 PIN £0.20 
40 PIN £0.27 


PANASONIC KX-T1520 
AUTOMATIC 
TELEPHONE 
ANSWERING 
SYSTEM 


TEAC 

DISK 

DRIVES 



TEAC FD-50A has 40 tracks giving 125K Bytes 
unformatted single density capacity. 

The FD-50A can be used in double density recording 
mode. 

The FD-50A is Shugart SA400 interface compatible. 
Directly compatible with Tandy TRS80 expansion 
interface. 

Also interfaces with Video Genie, SWTP, TRS80, 
North Star Horizon, Superbrain, Nascom, etc, etc. 
Address selection for Daisy chaining up to 4 Disks. 
Disks plus power supply housed in an attractive grey 
case. 


40 TRACK 

Single poor 
Disk Drive 


Double 
Disk Drive 


£389 + vat 


77 TRACK 

Single rOQQ 
Disk Drive 



£499 

FANTASTIC FOR FILE HANDLING 

ACULAB 
FLOPPY 
TAPE 

The tape that behaves 
a disc, for TRS-80 

LEVEL2 ' only £169 + VAT 

The Aculab Floppy Tape for the TRS-80 and Video Genie is a 
highly reliable digital storage system that provides many of 
the advantages of floppy disks at less cost. Automatic 
debounce routine for the Level 2 keyboard. 

Connects directly to TRS-80 Level 2 Keyboard. Operating 
and file handling software in ROM. 8 commands add 12 
powerful functions to Level 2 BASIC. 


OUR NEW SUPER LOCATION 
IN IRELAND 


19 Herbert Street, Dublin 2. 
Telephone: Dublin 604165 

HEAR OUR ADS ON 
RADIO NOVA 88.1 VHF Stereo 


NEC 

SPINWRITER 

only 

£1490 

+ VAT 


NEC's high quality printer uses a print "thimble” that has 
less diameter and inertia than a daisy wheel, giving a quieter, 
faster, more reliable printer that can cope with plotting and 
printing (128 ASCII characters) with up to five copies, fric¬ 
tion or tractor fed. The ribbon and thimble can be changed in 
seconds. 55 characters per second bidirectional printing — 
with red/black, bold, subscript, superscript, proportional 
spacing, tabbing, and much, much more. 






£190 

+ VAT 

One of the most technically advanced telephone 
I answering units available, the KX T1520 features a double 

I I cassette system, a C60 cassette for incoming calls, which 
can be limited to 30 secs each or recorded in their entirety, 
and a 20 sec continuous loop cassette for your outgoing 
messages which are recorded through the built-in 
microphone. Your telephone conversations can also be 
recorded after a bleep tone has notified your caller they are 
being taped. Incoming calls can be monitored and the ring 
control is adjustable. 

The remote call-in pick-up with Playback/Reset/Repeat 
I and Skip controls, activates the system to play back your 
I messages to you over the phone wherever you are in the 
j world. 


WE HAVE ONE OF THE LARGEST 
COLLECTIONS OF COMPUTER BOOKS 
UNDER ONE ROOF, ALONG WITH 
RACKS OF SOFTWARE FOR 
THE GENIE AND TRS80. 


8MHz Super Quality Modulators 

£4.90 

6MHz Standard Modulators 

£2.90 

I C12 Computer Grade Cassettes 

10 for £4.00 

Anadex Printer Paper — 2000 sheets 

£15.00 

1 Floppy Discs 5V*" Hard and Soft Sectored 

£2.90 ^ 

1 Floppy Disc Library Case 5 % " 

£3.50 ■ 

1 Ribbons DP8000 

1 

£3.50 

DP9500/9501 

£12.50 

All Prices exclusive VAT 



SHARP 
PC1211 

£79.90 

+ VAT 

COMPUTER 
POWER THAT 
ONCE FILLED A ROOM 
CAN NOW BE CARRIED IN YOUR POCKET! 

• Programs in BASIC •“QWERTY” Alphabetic 
Keyboard »1.9K Random Access Memory 

• Long Battery Life. 



^A/e give a full one year's guarantee 
on all our products, which 
normally only carry 3 months guarantee. 

A SELECTION OF APPLE INTERFACES 
ARE NOW AVAILABLE AT OUR 
EDGWARE ROAD SHOWROOM 



Delivery is added at cost. Please make cheques and postal orders payable to COMPSHOP LTD., or phone your order 
quoting BARCLAYCARD, ACCESS, DINERS CLUB or AMERICAN EXPRESS number 

I it M1 ;|>1 j ;yj L 1 [ CREDIT FACILITIES ARRANGED - send S.A.E. for application form. 
14 Station Road, New Barnet, Hertfordshire, EN5 1QW (Close to New Barnet BR Station — Moorgate Line) 
Telephone: 01-441 2922 (Sales) 01-449 6596 Telex: 298755 TELCOM G 

OPEN (BARNET) — 10am - 7pm — Monday to Saturday 


“Europes Largest Discount 
Personal Computer Stores" 



NEW WEST END SHOWROOM: 


311 Edgware Road, London W2. Telephone: 01-262 0387 

OPEN (LONDON) — 10am - 6pm — Monday to Saturday 

<£ IRELAND: 19 Herbert Street, Dublin 2. Telephone: Dublin 604155 

COMPSHOP USA, 1348 East Edinger, Santa Ana, California, Zip Code 92705. 
Telephone: 0101 714 5472526 


TELEPHONE SALES 
OPEN 24 hrs. 7 days a week 

01-449 6596 


[O 


































































































Adventure into ATARI 
With Maplin... 

Through a thousand galaxies of time and space... From across the ravaged oceans... 
From dungeons of fantasies... After battles with enchanted dragons... 

Come the fabulous Atari computers... the ultimate creative game computer! 


Command a space-ship through the dangers ot deep 
;pace where alien contact is inevitable or take your 
Dhances as you adventure through forbidden lands in 
search of secret treasures or play Space Invaders, 
steroids, Missile Command, Super Break-out, Shooting 
Sallery, Jawbreaker etc, etc, just like they are in the 
arcades, but in the comfort of your own home. 

Dr discover the superb Atari teach-yourself programs that 
svill help you learn: Programming, French, German, 


Spanish, Italian and Touchtyping. Or just use the Atari to 
create your own programs—the Atari makes it so easy to 
generate really incredible graphics. It’s all part of the 
magic of Atari. 

When you decide to buy Atari, you’re choosing one of the 
most advanced personal computers there is. 

When you decide to buy Atari from Maplin, you’ve made 
the best choice of all... because Maplin support 
Atari... totally! 


Write or phone for your Maplin/Atari information pack NOW! 


See Atari # # ' 

VYMpun : • • 

Maplin Electronic Supplies Ltd P.O. Box 3, Rayleigh, Essex. Tel: Southend (0702) 552911 /554155